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Pelican Technical Article:

Porsche Boxster 996 Engine Swap
Page 16

Difficulty Level: 9
Difficulty scale: Adding air to your tires is level one
Rebuilding a Porsche Motor is level ten

  This article is one in a series that have been released in conjunction with Wayne's new book, 101 Performance Projects for Your Porsche Boxster.  The book contains 312 pages of full color projects detailing everything from performance mods to changing your brake pads.   With more than 950+ full-color glossy photos accompanying extensive step-by-step procedures, this book is required reading in any Boxster owner's collection. The book is currently available and in stock now. See The Official Book Website for more details. 
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Figure 1
   Just another day at work.  Here's my project Boxster car after about 200-300 hours worth of work.  When I'm writing articles and books, I like to try to keep it real - using only off-the-shelf tools that anyone can buy.  I don't use a lift in my garage, because chances are, most people reading these articles don't have one either.  In this particular photo, I have my laptop hooked up to the car, and we're reading out the ECU program to send to Softronic for a 996 upgrade.
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Figure 2
   Although it shouldn't really matter, for some reason, the computer was not able to talk to the ECU in the Boxster without the engine wire harness installed.  I also tested the ECU with the factory PST-2 diagnostic unit, and it was not able to see it either.  So, I had to remove it from the Boxster engine, and drag it over to the trunk of the car and plug it in.  After I did this, the software (from Softronic) was able to recognize the ECU and download the programming from it. 
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Figure 3
   The very first step I tool in preparing the 996 motor was to remove the exhaust headers from the bottom of the engine.  The Boxster headers / exhaust is completely different, so you won't need any of these parts.  Next step is to remove the side mounting brackets from the 996 motor - the Boxster mounts from the "front" of the motor near the crankshaft pulley.
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Figure 4
   Another shot of the 996 engine with the headers removed.
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Figure 5
   The 996 engine wire harness is unique to the 996 and is another one of those parts that you toss aside in the conversion (maybe sell it on the Pelican Parts classifieds?).  The connecting harnesses in particular are completely different.  This photo shows the round harnesses that plug into the 996 chassis.
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Figure 6
   There are two parts to the 996 side brackets - the welded steel bracket itself, and then the cast metal piece that mounts to the engine.  You can easily remove the side brackets, but the cast pieces need to have the lower metal portion of the manifold removed in order to remove them as well (more on this later).
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Figure 7
   This photo shows the lower part of the 996 side brackets that need to be removed.
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Figure 8
   Here's the front of the 996 motor.  The big aluminum bracket that extends across the width of the engine is not used on the Boxster and needs to be removed.  Four bolts in the front hold this onto the engine.
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Figure 9
   Here's my little helper removing some of the bolts that hold on the front bracket.  This shot shows him putting the nut back onto the one stud that is not used on the Boxster mounting bracket (more on this later).
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Figure 10
   The 996 engine wire harness needs to be removed.  Start by disconnecting the wires that connect to the plugs on both sides (total number to be disconnected: six).
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Figure 11
   Then, disconnect the fuel injector connectors by pressing down on the metal spring clip within the connector (total number to be disconnected: six).
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Figure 12
   Here's another shot of the injectors unplugged.
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Figure 13
   The coil wire harness has a small plastic tab that you can pull back with your fingernail to release it from the coil.
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Figure 14
   Another shot of the coils disconnected.
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Figure 15
   At this point, I removed the screws that hold the fuel rails onto the engine (see tool & bolt in center of photo).
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Figure 16
   Loosen and remove the two wires that connect to the oil pressure sender.  One wire is for the oil pressure "idiot" lamp which indicates a loss of pressure, and the other is a measure of the actual pressure for the 996 oil pressure gauge.  I recommend reusing this part (you have to move it to the opposite side of the motor), as you will need it if you ever upgrade your gauge cluster to the 996 unit.
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Figure 17
   With all of the bolts removed, you can then simply pull off the fuel rails.  The injectors will pull out of the metal part of the manifold, and you should be able to take the whole assembly over to your workbench.  For this particular conversion, I used the 996 fuel rails, and simply modified them slightly to make them fit the Boxster fuel line system.  This also required two modifications to the fuel lines that run to the motor, located on the chassis (more on this later).
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Figure 18
   This photo shows that annoying cast metal piece that mounts to the top of the engine.  You need to loosen the black plastic manifold, and also the lower aluminum manifold in order to remove this bracket.
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Figure 19
   This photo shows that annoying cast metal piece that mounts to the top of the engine.  You need to loosen the black plastic manifold, and also the lower aluminum manifold in order to remove this bracket.
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Figure 20
   I recommend using swivel-foot sockets for the removal of just about everything on this engine.  There are way too many tight spaces and hard-to-reach fasteners.  I don't think it's possible to get some items off with a standard socket set.
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Figure 21
   Here's a close-up shot of one of the bolts that holds on the aluminum manifold.
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Figure 22
   This photo shows the bracket successfully removed.  The gold-colored sensor in the center of the photo is the oil pressure sender - we will be moving that to the opposite side of the engine shortly.
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Figure 23
   Here's a photo of a clamp that needs to be released prior to you removing the fuel lines / fuel rails from the engine.
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Comments and Suggestions:
Big Roy Comments: With additional weight,how much will the alignment of rear or front end be? Which transmission would be of choice, Automatic or Standard.Final drive do we have a reference to follow?
October 30, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: What vehicle are you aligning? - Nick at Pelican Parts  

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