Boxster Parts Catalog Boxster Accessories Catalog Boxster Technical Articles Boxster Tech Forums
 
  Search our site:    
View Recent Cars  |   Cart  | Project List | Order Status | Help    
Click here to view Part Diagrams
Get FREE Ground Shipping with the purchase of $75 in qualifying parts!
 

Boxster/Cayman

• Parts Catalog
• Tech Articles
• Boxster/Cayman Forum
Porsche 911
• Parts Catalog
• Tech Articles
• 993/996 Tech
• Tech Q&A
• Tech Email
• Buyer's Guide
• Parts Diagrams
• Elec. Diagrams
• 911 BBS
• Photo Gallery
• 911 Classifieds
• more 911 stuff
Porsche 914
• Parts Catalog
• Tech Articles
• Tech Q&A
• Tech Email
• 914-6 Conv
• Buyer's Guide
• Tech Specs
• EFI Hose Diags
• Parts Diagrams
• Elec. Diagrams
• 914 BBS
• Photo Gallery
• 914 Classifieds
• more 914 stuff...
924/944/968
• Parts Catalog
• Tech Articles
• Tech Specs
• Parts Diagrams
• Tech Q&A
• Tech Email
• 924/944 BBS
• Elec. Diagrams
• 944 Classifieds
• more 944 stuff...
996/Boxster
• Parts Catalog
• Tech Articles
• 996 BBS
• Boxster BBS
Porsche 928
• Parts Catalog
• 928 BBS
• 928 Classifieds
• more 928 stuff...
Porsche 356
• Parts Catalog
• Tech Articles
• Tech Q&A
• Parts Diagrams
• Elec. Diagrams
• 356 BBS
• Photo Gallery
• 356 Classifieds
• more 356 stuff...
Photos
• Porsche Events
• Owner's Gallery
Classifieds
• Cars For Sale
• Used Parts For Sale
Extras
• Vintage Porsche Literature
• Events Calendar
• Chat Room

Bookmark and Share

 


Pelican Technical Article:
Starter Replacement
 

 
Time: 3 hrs
Tab: $275
Talent:  
Tools:
Set of long extensions
Applicable Models:
986 Boxster (1997-04)
987 Boxster (2005-08)
Parts Required:
New starter
Hot Tip:
Remove the intake tube if you need better access
Performance Gain:
Reliable starting
Complementary Modification:
Replace knock sensor, oil cooler
 
   

  This article is one in a series that have been released in conjunction with Wayne's new book, 101 Performance Projects for Your Porsche Boxster.  The book contains 312 pages of full color projects detailing everything from performance mods to changing your brake pads.   With more than 950+ full-color glossy photos accompanying extensive step-by-step procedures, this book is required reading in any Boxster owner's collection. The book is currently available and in stock now. See The Official Book Website for more details.
 

Check out some other sample projects from the book: 

Need to buy parts for this project? Click here to order!
   
     Starter motors fail over time: it's just a fact of life. It may be that a starter motor is working fine one day and then all of a sudden dies the next day. Or, sometimes the motor gets weaker and weaker and turns the car over slower and slower. This is a possible sign that you should replace your starter motor. However, before replacing your starter, check the condition of your battery and make sure you're your ground strap is properly installed. (see Pelican Technical Article: Battery Disconnect Switch / Battery Buddy Installation). Also check the clutch pedal switch (see Pelican Technical Article: Brake Pedal Switch Replacement / Clutch Pedal Switch Replacement) and also the proper operation of the electronic immobilizer system. Try a different ignition key: the key has a built in RFID chip that may have somehow become damaged. If possible, have the system checked using the Porsche factory scan tools (PST-2 or PIWIS).

     The starter is located in the engine compartment under the convertible top. The first step in the removal process is to raise the top and gain access to the engine (see Pelican Technical Article: Air Filter / Pollen Filter Replacement). Then it's very important that you disconnect the battery. The starter has a direct connection to the positive terminal of the battery, and you can cause a lot of harm to yourself and the car if you short circuit the terminals (see Pelican Technical Article: Battery Disconnect Switch / Battery Buddy Installation). Once you have access to the top of the engine, remove the intake air snorkel that attaches to the throttle body (see Photo 4 in Pelican Technical Article: Cold Air Intake Installation). Then, loosen up the clamps that hold the intake manifold tube tight (see Figure 1). Now disconnect the hoses and bolts that attach the throttle body to the engine. For 1997-99 cars, you may have to loosen the clamp that holds the accelerator cable in place.

     With everything disconnected on the throttle body, simply rotate it up and out of the way. You should now have access to the starter, the two bolts attaching it to the engine, and the three electrical connections located on the rear. If you find yourself struggling to get the starter out, then you can loosen the intake manifold tube clamps quite a bit more, slide them to the inside and pull the entire intake tube off the top of the engine. This should give you more than enough room to remove the starter. Installation is the reverse of disassembly. Follow the rest of the photos in this project for details.

     With your intake manifold partially disassembled, you can reach many components on the top of the engine. It may be a good time to replace your knock sensors, replace your throttle body, reseal or replace your oil cooler, or replace your air-oil separator.
On the top of the engine, loosen up the clamps that hold the intake tube that is connected to the throttle body.
Figure 1
On the top of the engine, loosen up the clamps that hold the intake tube that is connected to the throttle body. You will need to loosen them up enough so that you can rotate the throttle body up and out of the way.
Large Image | Extra-Large Image
With the intake air snorkel disconnected and out of the way (see <a style=color:000080 href=http://www.
Figure 2
With the intake air snorkel disconnected and out of the way (see Pelican Technical Article: Cold Air Intake Installation), loosen up the bolts that hold the throttle body to the engine (purple arrow). The design of this mount varied slightly across the years, so you may have improvise a bit. Disconnect the air-oil separator hose from the side of the intake tube (orange arrow).
Large Image | Extra-Large Image
This photo shows the throttle body disconnected and rotated up and out of the way.
Figure 3
This photo shows the throttle body disconnected and rotated up and out of the way. You can disconnect the air-old separator hose from the throttle body (orange arrow), or at the separator itself, as this photo demonstrates. The starter is underneath the throttle body and now can be accessed for removal (yellow arrow). If you need additional room, then simply remove the intake tube with the throttle body attached.
Large Image | Extra-Large Image
I found it very difficult to reach one of the lower starter bolts from on top of the engine compartment.
Figure 4
I found it very difficult to reach one of the lower starter bolts from on top of the engine compartment. To solve this problem, I removed the cover behind the seats (see Pelican Technical Article: Drive Belt Replacement) and used some very long extensions to reach the bolt.
Large Image | Extra-Large Image
This photo shows the starter and one of the two bolts that hold it to the engine case.
Figure 5
This photo shows the starter and one of the two bolts that hold it to the engine case. The intake manifold has been removed on this particular engine so that you can see how and where the bolts are connected. When you are working in your engine compartment, you will have an obstructed view. The red arrow points to the two electrical connections (terminal 30 and 50) that are attached to the starter. The green arrow points to the bolt that is generally easiest to remove. The inset photo shows how the three electrical connections are attached to the starter.
Large Image | Extra-Large Image
This photo was taken of my brand new 996 engine during the process of prepping it for the 3.
Figure 6
This photo was taken of my brand new 996 engine during the process of prepping it for the 3.4 upgrade (Pelican Technical Article: Boxster Engine Conversion Project). The yellow is pointing to one of the two knock sensors that you can access while you have the intake manifold partially disassembled for the starter replacement. The knock sensor detects pinging on each cylinder bank. If one of the sensors is not working properly, then you may experience a drop in engine performance, or engine damaging detonation.
Large Image | Extra-Large Image
With the intake manifold out of the way, it's also a great time to replace or reseal your oil cooler.
Figure 7
With the intake manifold out of the way, it's also a great time to replace or reseal your oil cooler. The cooler is attached to the top of the engine with four screws and is easily accessed with the front part of the intake tube removed. When you install your new oil cooler, use four new seals and carefully clean the surface prior to installation. The hose that runs out of the top of the cooler is a water coolant hose and is connected to one of the nipples that attaches to the coolant tank (see Pelican Technical Article: Coolant Tank Replacement).
Large Image | Extra-Large Image
See Bonus Photos
Bonus Photos
Looking for more photos? Click to see bonus pictures for this project.
Need to buy parts for this project? Click here to order!
Bookmark and Share
Comments and Suggestions:
Terra byte Comments: I have a 2004 986. It has a base/ standard oil cooler I want to replace it with the S oil cooler which is bigger. Would anybody recommend this. will the car continue to work normal. Or should I stick to the base model.
June 27, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: I haven't done it myself. But the S cooler is larger and will cool more efficiently. Give our parts specialists a call at 1-888-280-7799. They can help you find the right part.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
mgfranz Comments: Just did my starter swap on a 2001, these instructions were almost perfect. One thing I will mention was that I disconnected and rotated out of place the plastic tube just to the passenger side of the starter, I think it's a crankcase vent tube. But moving it out of the way made it easy to get to the lower bolt with a swivel head ratchet, no need to go through the passenger compartment.
March 20, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thanks for the feedback and additional info. We appreciate it.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
Sli_Stunions Comments: My 05 987-S starter sometimes squeals as the engine starts, some say ignore it but the squeal is due to slow disengagement and isn't good for its bearings. I followed this excellent write-up then stripped & re-greased the motor, the old grease was dirty and hard in places, cleaning & re-packing is oddly therapeutic.
The starter bolts needed an E14 Star Socket, they were’nt plain heads.
The inlet manifold cross pieces have vacuum driven butterfly valves, the front one vac tube was very short and a pain to re-fit.
PSM failure warning came up but should go when driven.
June 9, 2013
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thanks for the feedback. Glad we could help.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
MAS Comments: Just did the starter replacement - first project I have ever done on my 2000 Boxster S! Worked like a charm the first time! A couple of points, though.

a. Save yourself some trouble and remove the throttle body rather than just trying to rotate it.
b. The bottom bolt is not 'difficult' to get to directly - it is impossible! The tip about going through the panel behind the seats was the only way to get it. But it leads to my final point:
c. A nice tool to have on hand 'just in case' would be a strong flexible magnet tool! When retracting the socket and extensions through the interior panel, my 15mm socket hung up on something and came off! Couldn't see it and could barely squeeze my hand in. Took about 20 minutes trying to move it with a thin screwdriver, then feeling around with my fingers multiple times before I was able to get it. A magnetic tool would have saved my knuckles a lot!

But follow the instructions and it works. And the rebuilt starter cranked up the first time, to my relief!
February 10, 2013
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thanks for the tips on the on the article indeed having a magnetic tool is a handy tool to have around. I went to copy the comments to the forms and perhaps someone else can find them useful as well. Thanks again. - Wayne at Pelican Parts  
Rob G Comments: Robert, why would anyone have to mention your import taxes? Shouldn't you know that already?
June 27, 2012
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thanks Robert. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Robert Comments: It appeared to be the battery who has passed away suddenly, probably due to its age and the disconnection for several hours when installing the rebuilt starter. All fixed now.
January 6, 2012
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thanks for the feedback. Glad we could help. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Robert Comments: Pursuant to my comment posted January 3, I found out that a cable/wire is connected to the lower bolt of the starter, which I think is part of the ground strap. This cable is not mentioned or shown in your article. I connected it the same way as I found it, and also connected the two electrical connections on the startes itself, and it worked fine. But a few days later I noticed my battery starts to weaken significantly, don't know why, before the replacement it has never been a problem. Any suggestions? Does it relate to the ground strap perhaps?

Kind regard,

Robert
January 4, 2012
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: If the ground strap went back in the same place you removed it, it should not create a charging system issue. I would check your starting and charging system. It is possible the battery is weak or the laternator is not charging. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Robert Comments: Dear Pelican guys and girls,

I did the starter replacement on my Boxster and found it very hard, but managed it after a 8-hour struggle or so, thanks to the tip to use the long extension to reach for the lower bolt. I learned a lot from it.

It was a bit a pity though that I had to pay an extra € 80 for import-taxes, so your rebuilt starter wasn't the bargain I expected it to be. Perhaps you can mention this for people ordering from Europe etc.

Kind regards,

Robert
January 3, 2012
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thanks for the feedback. Glad we could help. - Nick at Pelican Parts  

Check out some other sample projects from the book: 

 

Got more questions?  Join us in our Boxster / Cayman Technical Forum Message Board or our Carrera 996 / 997 Technical Forum Message Board and ask a question to one of our many automotive experts.

Or, see what other questions readers have asked about this article...
  Applies to: 1997 Boxster, 1998 Boxster, 1999 Boxster, 2000 Boxster, 2001 Boxster, 2002 Boxster, 2003 Boxster, 2004 Boxster, 2005 Boxster, 2006 Boxster, 2007 Boxster, 2008 Boxster, 1999 Carrera, 1999 996, 2000 Carrera, 2000 996, 2001 Carrera, 2001 996, 2002 Carrera, 2002 996, 2003 Carrera, 2003 996, 2004 Carrera, 2004 996, 2005 Carrera, 2005 997, 2006 Carrera, 2006 997, 2007 Carrera, 2007 996, 2008 Carrera, 2008 997
  Search our site:    

View Cart & CheckOut | Project List | Order Status |  Help    

 

[Home] [Customer Service] [Shopping Cart] [Project/Wish List]
  [Privacy Statement]  [Contact Us] [About Us] [Shipping]

Copyright © Pelican Parts Inc. -    DMCA Registered Agent Contact Page