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Pelican Technical Article:
Installing a Short Shift Kit and Replacing Shift Bushings
 

 
Time: 3 hours
Tab: $150-$350
Talent:  
Tools:
-
Applicable Models:
986 Boxster (1997-04)
987 Boxster (2005-08)
Parts Required:
Short Shifter Kit (SSK)
Hot Tip:
If you wish to renew your shifter without installing the short shift, just use the improved bushings
Performance Gain:
Shorter Shift throws
Complementary Modification:
Replace your shifter cables
 
   

  This article is one in a series that have been released in conjunction with Wayne's new book, 101 Performance Projects for Your Porsche Boxster.  The book contains 312 pages of full color projects detailing everything from performance mods to changing your brake pads.   With more than 950+ full-color glossy photos accompanying extensive step-by-step procedures, this book is required reading in any Boxster owner's collection. The book is currently available and in stock now. See The Official Book Website for more details.
 

Check out some other sample projects from the book: 

Need to buy parts for this project? Click here to order!
   
     One of the most popular additions to the Boxster is the installation of a short shift kit. The kit shortens the length of throw on the stock shifter, theoretically giving you the ability to shift faster. Installation is a moderate task, and should only take the better part of an afternoon.

     For the purpose of this project, I chose the Porsche factory short shift kit, which is nearly identical to others on the market (B&M supposedly manufactures the kit for Porsche). Both are available from PelicanParts.com.

     The factory kit is shown in Figure 2. It comes complete with everything that you need to replace your shift lever, and replace many of the shift bushings that have a tendency to wear out. Specifically, this kit contains Delrin bushings for the shifter arm and shift lever. The kit is very well constructed and all of the parts fit together with very tight tolerances.

     The process of installing the short shift kit involves basically swapping out the shift lever with the old one and installing the new bushings. Follow the steps shown in Photos 1 through 10 to remove the shifter and install the kit. When you have reinstalled the kit into the car and reattached the cables, be sure to test the shifter through all gears. Only when you have confirmed the shifter is working properly should you reinstall the center console.

     It took a short while (no pun intended) for me to get used to the new short shift kit. At first, I didn't really care for it, but after driving the car with it installed, I didn't want to go back to the standard shifter. If you're not sure about whether you'll like the short feel, I suggest that you drive someone else's car that has a short shifter installed. The procedure to remove the kit takes as long as the one to install it, so if you're not sure, then try it out beforehand.

     On a side note, many people install short shift kits in their cars thinking that it will fix problems that they are having with their transmission. This will not solve any problems, and will in most cases make a poorly shifting car shift even worse. The reason for this is that with the short shift kit, the torque arm on the shift lever is much shorter, giving you much less 'resolution' on your shifter. It's similar to having a gas pedal that only travels 1 inch over its range instead of 2-3 inches (see Pelican Technical Article: Sprint Booster Installation). You have less precision in how much throttle you want to give the car. In a similar manner, with the short shift kit you will have less precision on where the shift rod is placed. It's a wise idea to tackle the core problems with your transmission (synchros, shift bushings), prior to the installation of the short shift kit (see the other transmission projects in this book).

     Shifting Improvements: There may come a time in the ownership of your Boxster when you feel that the shifting performance of the car is not quite what it's supposed to be. Renewing the shifter bushings and the cable ends as detailed in this project are a good first step in ensuring crisp shifting. The other end of the shifter cable can wear too (see Photo 3 of Pelican Technical Article: Transmission Removal). Unfortunately, at this time the only way to renew the transmission-end bushings is to replace the entire cable. Replacement is pretty straightforward - it involves disconnecting the cable from the shifter, and then feeding it through the engine compartment to the transmission. On some cars, excessive deterioration of the engine or transmission mounts can cause erratic shifting. This is less of an issue with a cable-driven shifter like the Boxster, but crisp, firm mounts do help overall performance. See Project 10 and Project 36 for complete instructions on replacing the engine and transmission mounts.
Begin by unclipping the shifter boot from the rear and lift it up (inset).
Figure 1
Begin by unclipping the shifter boot from the rear and lift it up (inset). To remove the shifter knob some cars use a set screw, and some require you to twist the lower collar 90° and then lift to remove. Remove your old knob by simply pulling upwards on it: be careful not to accidentally smack yourself in the face!
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Shown here is the Porsche factory short shift kit.
Figure 2
Shown here is the Porsche factory short shift kit. The kit consists of a metal shifter a set of improved bushings and aluminum bushing carriers, and associated mounting hardware.
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Shown here are the various steps required to remove the center console.
Figure 3
Shown here are the various steps required to remove the center console. Remove front retaining screw, located under the shifter boot Pull off side cover (it snaps off) and remove lower screw (green arrow) Pull off the front lower console cover (red arrow) Remove the coin tray insert, remove the two screws (yellow arrows), unplug and remove window switch assembly, and remove the additional screw found underneath. Pull back e-brake side cover and remove (pull in the direction of the purple arrow). Also remove the rear storage compartment: there is a screw hidden underneath the small rubber mat inside the compartment, and another screw hidden under the small coin holder (three total in the rear). Unplug any remaining harnesses still attached to the console
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This photo shows the center console removed.
Figure 4
This photo shows the center console removed. The purple arrows point to wire harnesses that need to be removed prior to pulling the console from the car.
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With the center console removed, you can now work on disconnecting the cables from the shifter.
Figure 5
With the center console removed, you can now work on disconnecting the cables from the shifter. A- Remove the plastic shifter cover, and you will see the cables underneath. B- mark the existing position of the cables with a permanent marker so that you can assemble them back together in the same position as when they came apart. C- Slide the spring-loaded retainers towards the front of the car and release the cable from its holder. D- Unclip the shift cables from the rear of the shifter housing and place them off to the side. Finally, unscrew the shifter housing from the floor and remove from the car.
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The stock shifter uses a square bushing that rides in the side cam piece (red arrow).
Figure 6
The stock shifter uses a square bushing that rides in the side cam piece (red arrow). The new short shifter uses a metal ball instead: lubricate this ball prior to assembling it into the shifter. To remove the old stock bushings, use a razor blade and chip away at the edges of the bushings. When the edges have been removed, slide the bushing out of the bore and remove the stock shifter. If you are reusing the cable-end, pop it off of the old shifter and install it onto the new one (see Figure 9).
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The new bushings are installed onto the aluminum cylinders located on either side of the shifter.
Figure 7
The new bushings are installed onto the aluminum cylinders located on either side of the shifter. Place the washer in-between the bushing and the bottom of the cylinder. Place the bushing on the shifter shaft, push it in towards the shifter (the direction of the purple arrow) and then fasten it in place using the circlip (yellow arrow, lower left). The circlip goes on the inside of the shifter housing to hold the metal housing from falling out in the direction opposite of the purple arrow (see Figure 9). Be sure to pre-lubricate the bushing prior to assembly (upper left).
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Reduce the end play in the shifter by turning the set screw with a hex driver.
Figure 8
Reduce the end play in the shifter by turning the set screw with a hex driver. Turn the set screw until it's tight, and then back it off about ¼ to ½ turn. Lock it in place with the jam nut to secure the assembly. The set screw and jam nut can be installed on either side of the shifter.
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I recommend using new cable ends (yellow arrow) when refurbishing your shifter: they will aid in keeping a crisp, reliable feel in your shifter.
Figure 9
I recommend using new cable ends (yellow arrow) when refurbishing your shifter: they will aid in keeping a crisp, reliable feel in your shifter. Lubricate the ball end of the shifter with some white lithium grease prior to installing the cable end. You may have to use some significant force to get the cable end attached: use a hammer to tap it on if necessary.
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Here is the shifter assembly, completely upgraded with the new factory short shift kit and the improved bushings.
Figure 10
Here is the shifter assembly, completely upgraded with the new factory short shift kit and the improved bushings. The two purple arrows point to the location of the two installed circlips. Reinstall the kit back into the car, reversing what you had done previously. Use plenty of grease on all the bushings and pivot points.
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Replacement bushings for the stock shifter are not available separately: you have to purchase a whole new shifter, at a cost of about $200!  Fortunately, the short shift kit contains a set of improved bushings that can also be used with the stock shifter.
Figure 11
Replacement bushings for the stock shifter are not available separately: you have to purchase a whole new shifter, at a cost of about $200! Fortunately, the short shift kit contains a set of improved bushings that can also be used with the stock shifter. If you wish to keep your stock shifter and renew the feel in your shifter, then I recommend picking up a set of these improved bushings. One bushing kit is shown in the inset (two required).
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See Bonus Photos
Bonus Photos
Looking for more photos? Click to see bonus pictures for this project.
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Comments and Suggestions:
congalee Comments: why are the muffle clamps on the 987 porsche boxster at the tail end of the exhaust system spot welded ? I put the clamps back on without spot welding would that cause a vibration on fast acceleration ?
October 22, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: They are welded for reinforcement. The vibration could be caused by the exhaust being improperly aligned. Check that it is not making contact with the body. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Xxbaxinxbsxx Comments: Ok...installed a short shift kit in an attempt to correct a client's complaint about heavy resistance when shifting...it should be noted that the vehicle 2002 Boxster is hard resistant to shift into ANY gear...it doesn't matter if the engine is running and with the engine off, it doesn't matter if the clutch is depressed or not...have replaced components that are known to be problematic collapsed transmission mount, gear oil...at a loss here as I was confident this shift kit would alleviate the concern per Porsche's technical service bulletin...any helpful hints as to what direction I should point my troubleshooting? I work on cars for a living and have never seen anything like this...I also do not have a lot of experience with Porsche primarily MB, BMW, etc., so ANY guidance would be greatly appreciated...
October 16, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Have to detached the cables to see if one is binding? - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Michael S Comments: HI NICK

ANY IDEA WHY Ι FEEL QUITE BIG FRICTION WHEN SHIFTING GEARS ON MY BOXSTER? THE CAR HAS A SHORT SHIFT KIT FITTED.. IS ANYTHING I CAN DO TO IMPROVE THAT?

PROMPT REPLY WILL HIGHLY APRECIATED.
September 8, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: I would inspect the short shift kit and see if it is corroded or dirty. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Boo Comments: Hi Nick,
It turned out to be the right socket, the cable ball just popped out.I have ordered the right side plastic Shifter Linkage from the local Porsche Dealer.
July 17, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thanks for the follow up. We appreciate it.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
Boo Comments: Hi Nick,
Thanks for answering my comment.I have removed the console and found that the right cable end has come out of whatever it is plugged into.Does this indicate that the receiver of the cable ball needs to be replaced; or should other parts be replaced too?
July 15, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: COuld be just the cable or the lever. Can you share a photo of the parts? - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Boo Comments: Excellent Article!My 2002 Boxster S shifter gave way yesterday.Luck for me it was in 2nd gear and I made it home. It now just flops back and forth doing nothing?Would a new shifter assy fix this problem? Porsche told me I would have to pull the transmission to fix; car only has 51K miles and was shifting beautifully before it let loose.
June 26, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Glad you made it back safely.

I would check if the shift linkage has become disconnected or if a part failed. You will need to inspect the vehicle to see what is broken, before ordering parts. - Nick at Pelican Parts
 
El Guapo Comments: I ordered an EVO SSK from Pelican the B&M was out of stock. The project was not that difficult – about 2 hours. The EVO instructions were a little hard to understand, as I DID NOT RECEIVE any! Oh well, armed with Wayne’s book and the internet all turned out fine. I am really happy with result. The shifts do take a little more effort, but I like the feel of the shifts. I would recommend installing one just ensure you get the instructions. Here is a before and after video: http://youtu.be/QhMbPWpoXm0 -Enjoy!
January 23, 2013
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thanks for the feedback and for adding the link to the video! - Wayne at Pelican Parts  
Shadrach74 Comments: B ruzer,
The shifter should be not really be "stiff" after install. The gear changes will require a little bit more effort as you have less leverage with a short shift because the “load” which is the cable end of the lever has been moved further away from the fulcrum the pivot point of the shifter. Adjusting the cable will not affect the "stiffness" of the shifter, it will only affect where it engages the gears in terms of travel. It will also affect the “neutral” position of the shifter. Make sure that nothing is interfering with the movement of the shifter and that nothing is binding.
January 14, 2013
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Correct. The shifter should not be the best after the installation but then again, the word "stiff" is a subjective term. For someone who has not used as short shift kit in the past, the installation of one might seem to make the shifter very stiff. I would agree with the advice here, check to make sure the cables are not binding anywhere. - Wayne at Pelican Parts  
B ruzer Comments: As per Homeboy981 comments I have installed the short shifter but the shift is very stiff what or how do I adjust the cables to get the sweet spot and smooth out the shifts which were perfect before my mod.
January 6, 2013
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: As I stated above with the new short shifter in place, shifting will be a bit stiffer but it shouldn't be terribly stiff to the point of where it's uncomfortable to shift. There is a small alignment tool that you can use to align the shift cables it it can be seen in one of the photos of this project. Putting in place and then adjust the cables together and it should adjust them to the proper length. If your car is missing this too that you can buy one too, although I do not have the part number handy off the top of my head. - Wayne at Pelican Parts  
2001 Boxster Comments: It took me about 2 hours to install a B&M short shifter using these and B&M's instructions. Very helpful! I marked my cables well and didn't have any issues with that. My only advice is to make sure you don't try to tighten the jam nut too tight. You'll spin the bushing and at least partially strip the notch in the shifter housing lucky for me, the ABS is *a little* flexible.
October 14, 2012
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thanks for the feedback. Glad we could help.- Nick at Pelican Parts  
chongdog83 Comments: What are the part numbers for the improved brushing kit? I took apart my center console and see that there is a tremendous amount of play in my shifter but I don't want to replace it with the short shifter.
August 27, 2012
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Give our parts specialists a call at 1-888-280-7799. They can help you find the right part. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Homeboy981 Comments: Good instructions Wayne. However, I did NOT MARK my cables properly and cannot tell how far they are supposed to go back in. Is there a way to "re-adjust" to get back to that "sweet spot"? Right now the shifter works but it is NOT engaging the gear. Means I need to "choke up" on the cable some more, right? How do I know how far to go? What is downside to getting it wrong? Thanks Wayne - keep the good info coming - and we will all keep ordering parts to give you time to get back into the garage and make more instructions!
June 7, 2012
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: If I remember correctly, there is an adjustment tool used to adjust the cables. You may have to visit a shop with the tools needed to adjust the cables. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
1997 986 Comments: I notice that in the picture showing the completed assembly ready to be re-installed the green plate which clips onto the bottom of the console is missing. I'm not sure what the purpose of that plate is but I had to remove that plate on my assembly for the cables to move freely after installing my short throw shifter.
Thanks for all the great information you guys provide.
May 21, 2012
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: I've heard this called a "coin deflector", but I'm not 100% sure exactly what that means. Maybe it has something to do with blocking coins from falling down into the shift area? Either way, I've heard indeed that some short shift kits interfere with it and it can be removed safely, although I did not have that particular issue on my Boxster (2000). - Wayne at Pelican Parts  
Gregoogle Comments: Thanks alot! Ordered the same kit, took about 40 minutes to get it all put in. The pictures help very much! Good write up
February 3, 2012
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thanks for the feedback. Glad we could help. - Nick at Pelican Parts  

Check out some other sample projects from the book: 

 

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  Applies to: 1997 Boxster, 1998 Boxster, 1999 Boxster, 2000 Boxster, 2001 Boxster, 2002 Boxster, 2003 Boxster, 2004 Boxster, 2005 Boxster, 2006 Boxster, 2007 Boxster, 2008 Boxster, 1999 Carrera, 1999 996, 2000 Carrera, 2000 996, 2001 Carrera, 2001 996, 2002 Carrera, 2002 996, 2003 Carrera, 2003 996, 2004 Carrera, 2004 996, 2005 Carrera, 2005 997, 2006 Carrera, 2006 997, 2007 Carrera, 2007 996, 2008 Carrera, 2008 997
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