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Replacing CV Joints and Boots / Axle Replacement
 
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Pelican Technical Article:

Replacing CV Joints and Boots / Axle Replacement

Time:

4 hours4 hrs

Tab:

$350

Talent:

***

Tools:

Hex socket tool set

Applicable Models:

Porsche 986 Boxster (1997-04)
Porsche 986 Boxster S (2000-04)
Porsche 987 Boxster (2005-12)
Porsche 987 Boxster S (2005-12)

Parts Required:

CV Joints, or complete axles, CV joint grease, gaskets, CV boots

Hot Tip:

Use the weight of the car to hold the axle while you loosen the axle nut

Performance Gain:

Smoother drivetrain

Complementary Modification:

Replace your rear wheel bearings
101 Performance Projects for Your Porsche Boxster

This article is one in a series that have been released in conjunction with Wayne's new book, 101 Performance Projects for Your Porsche Boxster. The book contains 312 pages of full color projects detailing everything from performance mods to changing your brake pads. With more than 950+ full-color glossy photos accompanying extensive step-by-step procedures, this book is required reading in any Boxster owner's collection. The book is currently available and in stock now. See The Official Book Website for more details.

One of the most common suspension items to replace or service on the Boxster is the constant velocity, or CV joints that connect the wheels to the transmission. These bearings, packed in grease, experience a tremendous amount of use throughout the years, and thus have a tendency to wear out after about 100,000 miles or so. One of the clear signs that the joints need replacing is the distinct sound of a clunk, clunk, clunk coming from the rear axle when the car is in motion.

In some cases, the boots that cover and protect the CV joints will be torn and need replacing. The procedure for replacing the boots is very similar to the procedure for replacing the entire joint. New boots should be installed each time a CV joint is replaced.

For the Boxster, Porsche sells only the inner CV joints, or a complete, replaceable axle. The new axle contains both the inner and outer CV joints, as well as the boots that cover and protect them. Although the inner Boxster CV joints are available separately, I typically recommend installing the complete axle. All you need to do is to bolt it up to the car, and you don't have to mess with disassembly or CV joint grease.

If you are going to be replacing the entire axle, then you first need to loosen up the big axle nut. With the car on the ground, in gear, and the emergency brake on, remove the center hub cap (see Photo 3 of Pelican Technical Article: Tire and Wheel Sizing), and use a long breaker bar to loosen up the drive shaft flange axle nut. This nut is tightened to more than 460 Nm (340 ft-lbs): it will take quite a bit of force to loosen it up. Lift the car up again and remove the wheel once more. If you are going to be replacing the inner CV joint only, then you can leave this nut alone.

The next step in replacement of boots, joints or the axle is to jack up and raise the car off of the ground and remove the road wheels (see Pelican Technical Article: Jacking Up and Lifting the Boxster on Jack Stands). Then, remove the diagonal braces and the aluminum transmission cover (see Pelican Technical Article: Changing Automatic Transmission Fluid). Now remove the bolts from the inner CV joint using an hex socket (see Figure 2). In order to gain access to the CV bolts, rotate the wheel of the car until you can clearly get your hex socket on the bolts. Then, pull the emergency brake and place the transmission into first gear. This will allow you to loosen the bolts without having the axle spin. When you have removed all the bolts that you can from this angle, release the brake, take the car out of gear, and rotate the wheel until you can reach the next set of bolts. When all of the bolts are removed, suspend the end of the drive axle with some rope or wire.

With the CV joint disconnected from the transmission, you can work on replacing either one of the CV boots, or the inner CV joint. If you're replacing the entire axle, then you can skip these steps, as the axles come complete with new joints and boots. Remove the six bolts and the half-moon washers from the joint and pry off the dust cap (blue arrow, Figure 2). Then remove the circlip that holds the CV joint onto the axle (Figure 3). Cut or disconnect the clamp that holds the boot to the shaft, and the old CV and boot should simply slide off of the shaft. In general, it's a really bad sign if large balls from the bearing start falling out. That's a clear indicator that you need to replace the joint. If you are reusing the joint again, make sure that you carefully place it in a plastic bag, and avoid getting any dirt or grime in it. Even a crystal of sand or two accidentally placed in the CV joint can help it wear out prematurely. Inspect both CV joints for any wear prior to installing them back into the car. If you are simply replacing the boots, then carefully pry the old boot off of the joint. It is pressed onto to the end of the joint in a similar manner as the dust boot.

With the inner CV joint and boot completely removed, then your axle should resemble the inset of Figure 4. If you are replacing the boot on the outer joint, undo the clamp, and remove the boot and cover. Replacement boots aren't typically sold with the metal mounting plate attached, so you'll have to pull the old boot off of the plate and transfer the new one to it. Reinstall using a new pinch clamp, but don't tighten it quite yet. Reassemble your old CV or a new one onto the axle. With the new boot attached, rotate the joint through its entire motion before tightening the small, inner boot clamp: you don't want it to be too tight.

Whether you're reinstalling your old CV or using a new one, I recommend repacking the joint with grease. Also make sure that you place plenty of grease in and around the boot. Move the joint in and out as you insert the grease to make sure that you get it well lubricated, as the new CV joints do not come pre-greased. My preferred choice of lube is Swepco 101: a $12 tube should be good for about four joints total. When reinstalling the bolts into the transmission flange, make sure that the bolt threads are free of grease. Any grease on the threads can cause the bolts to come loose, and create a dangerous situation. Also, all your CV bolts should be checked after about 500 miles of driving.

If you are replacing the entire axle, then there are two different methods you can use. You can remove the entire wheel bearing carrier, (detailed in Pelican Technical Article: Wheel Bearing Replacement), or you can simply slide the axle out of the hub if you have enough clearance. Very often, the axle will get stuck in the wheel hub due to corrosion or rust: it may need some encouragement with a big hammer to be removed. You will need to remove the exhaust and the rear sway bar once you have the axle nut removed in order to gain enough clearance to drop the axle down (see Figure 6).

Once you have the entire assembly back together, take the car out for a drive, and check the rear for noises. All should be smooth and quiet, and the boots should no longer leak.

Shown here is an inner CV joint replacement kit.
Figure 1

Shown here is an inner CV joint replacement kit. The kit comes complete with the joint, the boot, a new boot clamp, new bolts, a new circlip, and enough CV joint grease to lubricate the joint. If you are planning to remove the whole axle, be sure to order a replacement axle nut as well (shown in photo). On the Boxster, the outer CV joint is not available separately, but must be purchased as part of a complete axle. This is because the joint is integrated into the stub axle and cannot be separated. If the boots are damaged and leaking, then you should replace them, because dirt and debris can find their way inside.

This photo shows the process of disconnecting the inner CV joint from the transmission.
Figure 2

This photo shows the process of disconnecting the inner CV joint from the transmission. Use a really long extension and a hex socket tool to easily remove each of the six bolts that secure the joint to the transmission (inset). With the joint disconnected, remove the bolts and the half-moon washers. There is a dust cap (blue arrow) that protects the CV joint. Carefully pry this dust cap off to access the circlip underneath.

The CV joint is held onto the axle by a circlip, which is very difficult to see in this photo.
Figure 3

The CV joint is held onto the axle by a circlip, which is very difficult to see in this photo. The two orange arrows point to the ends of the circlip that must be removed by using a set of special circlip pliers designed specifically for the task (inset).

The four CV joints are located in the rear of the car, attached to both the transmission flanges and the stub axles on the trailing arms.
Figure 4

The four CV joints are located in the rear of the car, attached to both the transmission flanges and the stub axles on the trailing arms. I recommend that you replace the joints in pairs: either both of the inside ones or both of the axles. Chances are if one of the joints is showing signs of wear and deterioration, then the other three will not be far behind. This photo shows the new CV joint installed with a new boot and boot clamp (purple arrow). The inset photo shows the axle with the boot and CV removed. You need to remove everything off of the inside end of the axle as shown, in order to slide on new boots for both the inner and outer joints.

If you are replacing the entire axle, then you need to remove the outer axle nut (yellow arrow).
Figure 5

If you are replacing the entire axle, then you need to remove the outer axle nut (yellow arrow). This is best done with the car on the ground by placing a long breaker bar on the nut while the wheel holds it steady. Pry off the small inner hubcap to gain access to this nut while the wheel is still on the car (see Photo 3 of Pelican Technical Article: Tire and Wheel Sizing).

There are two methods you can use to remove the axle from the car.
Figure 6

There are two methods you can use to remove the axle from the car. You can remove the wheel bearing carrier as detailed in Pelican Technical Article: Wheel Bearing Replacement, or you can drop down the rear sway bar and exhaust to gain enough clearance to remove the axle. Unless I'm planning on doing some major work on the brake calipers or the wheel bearing, I typically prefer to drop down the exhaust to gain enough clearance. As you can see in this photo, the exhaust pipe (blue arrow) is getting in the way of dropping down the axle (red arrow). The axle flange on the transmission is shown by the orange arrow.

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Comments and Suggestions:
xanadu Comments: Nick, I talked to the service advisor and the manager at my local dealer about the grease. they told me when they changed the boots and repacked the joints they got grease inside the pipe and with no place for it to go it comes out the little hole. I put a plug in the end, so hopefully whatever grease is in that pipe will stay contained.
August 5, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thanks for the follow up. Glad yo hear you got an answer. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
xanadu Comments: Nick, there is no cotter pin for this nut. the hole in the center goes all the way in, at least 12" and grease is coming out as I drive. any suggestions?
August 1, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Weird. OK, something must be missing inside the axle. If only one side has this issue, it's possible a cap was knocked or left off during the repair. I can't picture it, Give our parts specialists a call at 1-888-280-7799. They can help you figure out if there is a plug or cap for that axle. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Chris Comments: I'm trying to follow this guide to replace my inner CV joints. I was able to fully remove the axles from the car without any problems. I was able to remove the dust cover and circlip that hold the inner CV joint onto the axle no problems. However, I simply cannot remove the inner CV joint from the axle. It seems stuck. I've tried putting the axle in a table vice and hitting the cv joint as hard as I could with a piece of metal and a 5 pound sledge hammer. It won't budge even the tiniest amount. Any tips on how to remove the CV joint? It seems impossible.
July 31, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: You have to overcome the snapring. If the cv is moving at an angle when you hit it, it will not break free. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
xanadu Comments: Nick, take a look at figure 5 in the Wayne book article this thread is attached to. the yellow arrow is pointing to the hole. It is in the center of the axle. The axle nut is around the axle shaft, and in the center of the axle shaft is this hole. The center of this axle has a hole, looks like a machine hole used to center on the lathe, I was able to stick a thin long screwdriver at least 12" into this hole.
July 29, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Ok, gotcha. So the hols is at the center of the threads, the cotter pin goes through the castle nut, then you can likely see the cotter pin in that hole? The hole is normal, it should not go all the way into the CV joint. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
xanadu Comments: 2000 boxter tip, no S. I just had the CV boots replaced on the rear axles. I now notice grease coming out of the small hole in the middle of the axle on one side. Is this normal? or is there supposed to be a plug in that hole? I put a small diameter long screwdriver in that hole and it appears to go all the way through the axle. I suspect grease from the CV joint is being forced out as the car is being driven. What can I do about this?
July 24, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Can you share a photo of the hole? - Nick at Pelican Parts  
TTBoxster Comments: Hey Pelican Parts, first I wanted to say thank you for all these guides!!

My question is: Can I change only the inner cv boot/joint while the car is on rhino ramps? This means that the weight of the vehicle will still be on the tires. Thanks!
November 14, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: No, the axle would have to be removed. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Ben Comments: Hi, my outer cv boot is splitted... no big deal.
But I want to make sure as I didn't undertand it well, your are removing the axle while the outer part is sill attached to the wheel bearing ?
I don't want to change the whole axle, just the boot. So can I just disconnect it from the transmission and slide it out of the spindle I mean the outer part of the CV axle ?

Thank you !
September 12, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: When replacing boots, it is best to remove the entire axle and rebuild it in a vise. Way easier to get it back together. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
ftp19601960 Comments: Apparently at least inner CV joints are identical to those on Z3M. The kit for Z3M contains Hylomar to seal flanges. Do we need use it here too?
June 1, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: As a BMW Z3? I am not familiar with the compatibility.


Give our parts specialists a call at 1-888-280-7799. They can help you figure it out.

I opened a post in our forums. A Pelican community member may be able to answer your question.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
rsf Comments: Hi everyone...I've noticed a couple people on here have been able to get the CV axle out by dropping down the exhaust and catalytic converter. I've attempted this using what I think is logic to drop the exhaust, but haven't been able to. Does anyone have any pictures or links that help with dropping the exhaust enough to get the axle out.

Thanks in advance,

Ron
April 12, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: See this tech article:

http://www.pelicanparts.com/techarticles/Boxster_Tech/46-EXHAUST-Muffler/46-EXHAUST-Muffler.htm - Nick at Pelican Parts
 
Awenda5 Comments: The bolts that hold the inner CV on, what size hex wrench is needed. I tried a 6 mm and am concerned I stripped the inner head of the bolt?
March 17, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: What vehicle are you working on? They could be 6mm or 8mm depending on your vehicle. Just be sure the hex opening is free of dirt and the bit is fully seated. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Greg Comments: A couple comments on axle shaft/ cv joint work on my '03 Boxster 97k miles. No need to remove hub, bearing carrier, or entire muffler to get shaft out. Just removed axle nut, inner cv bolts, stability plate, diagonals, and dropped catalytic converter only. The shaft cv joints will compress about 2" to allow the inner joint to come free of the drive flange and drop down. A little tap to free the outer spline end and the whole shaft easily clears to come out. My problem was the metal dust cover that came with the GNK boot kit was too large in diameter for my app, and the inner boot clamp was too small, even tho the boot was correct. Does anybody know what the application is for the larger diameter dust cover?
January 9, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: I do not. Give our parts specialists a call at 1-888-280-7799. They can help you figure it out. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
YeoBade Comments: Has anyone tried using the universal neoprene stretch over with a cone boot kits?
January 4, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: I have not. I opened a post in our forums. A Pelican community member may be able to answer your question.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
UNYboater Comments: Simple question: can I remove just a section of the exhaust to drop the axle out or does it 'all' need to be removed? And if 'all', what does that entail? From the exhaust manifold out? Or some sub-section?
I did look at the pictures in Project 46: Muffler Replacement but it didn't clear it up for me. I'd rather not mess with the geometry/alignment.
BTW, I'm replacing the entire axle on an '01 S.
June 20, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: You will have to drop down the entire muffler. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Neal Comments: Follow-up on how clean - how does one get the outer CV joints spotless while still attached to axle from underneath the car - suggestions? Inner joints are easier as they are off the axle, but after an hour each with paper towels and rags there is still old grease in there. Do I need to flush with something? Thanks.
May 21, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: I would use an aerosol brake cleaner. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Neal Comments: Car is 2004 Boxster S. Thanks for the excellent pictures and instruction, I suggest the following additions to help future DIY'rs: 1 remove exhaust pipes to allow clearance for inner CV to clear transmission case - had I done this first I would have saved 2 hours. 2 if inner CV does not come free of axle by hand or tapping with hammer, use large gear puller I had to do this with my passenger side CV, worked great. 3 provide recommendation for cleaning old grease out of CV need to remove or not, if so, how clean? and amount of grease to replace oz or ml.
May 21, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: The rebuild kits come with the right amount of grease for one joint. It is a few ounces, I don't recall the amount. Clean as in spotless.

Thanks for the additional info and feedback. We appreciate it.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
Neal Comments: Driver's side inner CV slid right off no problem. Passenger side inner CV is stuck tight. I tapped, then hammered to loosen, still doesn't budge at all. If hammering does not work, what is the next option - is there any kind of puller for this joint?
May 18, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: You didn't mention the vehicle you have. If it is stuck on the output flange, you can either tap it off using a soft-faced hammer or lever it off using a prybar. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
NEV Comments: The mechanic at my local dealer told me that my inner CV joint had to be changed because it is leaking, and told me to get a inner cv joint seal. Is there a Seal? because from what I can see in the kit there is no seal?
May 14, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: I think there is a repair kit. Give our parts specialists a call at 1-888-280-7799. They can help you find the right part.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
Nick Comments: Replacing the axle that was disconnected at the cv joint. What is the torque spec on the cv bolts? Is there a pattern to follow when torquing? Can you please provide? For 2000 boxster 2.7 with manual trans.
March 21, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: When tightening fasteners, always would in a criss-cross pattern.

Torque:
M8: 39 Nm
M10: 81 Nm
M22x1.5: 460 Nm - Nick at Pelican Parts
 
Daniel Comments: Any tips for removing the dust cover from the inner CV joint? My appears to have been reinstalled before and it is ver tight. I don't want to pry on it and booger up the fit.
March 17, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: You can try lightly tapping it off using a flathead screwdriver. Work at the edges, gently. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
robin Comments: I'm in the process of replacing a CV joint boot on the inner CV joint. I have followed the instructions up to an including removing the circlip however I can't pull the cv joint off the drive shaft. The inner race seems stuck on the spine. Is this normal - any tips on pulling it off ? I have not removed the exhaust yet so when I pull I only have limited apace before the cv joint will clash with the transmission casing so I'm not sure whether there will be enough space to remove the joint even if it starts to move on the spine - do I need to take the exhaust off ? any help appreciated as I'm trying to get up and running for next weekend
Thanks
Robin
January 4, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: It should pull off. Sometimes the snap ring sticks. Try moving it away from wheel, then back. If you feel you need more room, I would remove the muffler. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Elevator man Comments: Thanks for a lot of info.I was surprised by the horror stories some had changing rear CV boot/bearings.I changed both boots in 90 mins.I repaired elevators before but never a Porsche. Short version: removing struts, exhausts, pan, torsion except the snap ring. Using extensions on a 1/2 drive wrench & allen bit I removed all 6 bolts. Extensions had enough play where you didn't need a universal-they're knuckle busters.Using an 18" screwdriver and a couple taps the rings bent right off. Using sheet metal shears I cut off the boot. The rubber was thicker than I thought confinement made it easier. Using a utility knife was out of the question because I don't like stiches. My car 2001 w/40 k mls you can tell was not used much. 1st thing to go is anything rubberdry rot& plastic will get brittle without temperature change.Not knowing how long the boots were bad,I flushed the bearings with acetone using a syringeused for liquid meds. After that blow out bearing and you have a brand new looking bearing-Looks aren't always a good sign. Now check your bearing. Using a rubber caster insert a 3/8 " bolt. Put it on your drill & spin the bearing. It will be too hard to hear a bad bearing, but with a steady hand you will feel a slight thump in the drill. If you feel that, time for a new bearing. I read in your article about the guy that had problems removing the bearing so he used heat-Bad no-no. The bearing is stainless, the shaft is hardened steel. The heat will be absorbed by the shaft faster than the bearing, thus defeating the purpose. Now that your replacing the inner bearing-might as well replace the outer. With a bad bearing you'll have enough clearance to pop out a ball bearing with a screwdriver. This will be the hardest one, the others will pop right out. No more outer race or ball bearings. Now the inner race-the stubborn one.Using a 6" grinder with a wafer cutoff wheel, cut the race but don't go all the way through so you don't hit the shaft. If you nick the shaft no big deal. Emory will take care of that.Now take a chisel and give it a pop - no more inner race.Clean shaft with emory, heat new bearing slightly and slide it on. Make sure you have the snap ring right there because you want to install that making sure bearing is home.Let cool and your done.If you are in a hurry to cool-which you shouldn't be,cool with oilNEVER WATER.Pack bearing,reinstall,put top down & go for a ride.Sorry for the lengthy article-hope it helps-don't pay to have done.
October 23, 2013
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thanks for the additional Info. We appreciate it. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
owl Comments: Circlip Pliers?
Thank you for the write-up. Am I able to purchase the special Circlip pliers on Pelican?

Thank you.
October 8, 2013
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Yes, Give our parts specialists a call at 1-888-280-7799. They can help you find the right circlip pliers. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Tosh Comments: Hi, I have 2002 Boxster 2.7L MT.
I need to replace the left & right CV drive shafts due to failure of CV boots.
I want to purchase the drive shaft parts online, but I'm looking for the answer to few questions before I can buy.

1.Are the left & right drive shaft two different parts?
2.Are there different drive shaft for 2.5L, 2.7L, or 3.2L engine sizes?
3.Is there difference between drive shafts for MT or AT?

I would appreciate any information anyone has!
Thank you.
June 29, 2013
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Give our parts specialists a call at 1-888-280-7799 and they can help figure out which part or repair kit you need. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Patrick Comments: I did a drive boot replacement for second time, off side this time. I can confirm I was able to remove the drive shaft without disconnecting any of the the hub links except the roll bar link bottom attachment and without complete removal of the exhaust.
Removed the following 4 sway bar nuts,4 front and back gearbox pan nuts/bolts you can leave opposite side attached, 3 exhaust flange bolts,2 roll bar attachment bolts and the 6 inner drive shaft bolts.
Like this you can carefully leaver the exhaust down enough to pass the drive shaft inwards below the gearbox.
I did experience slight mis alignment of the bolts when push the pan back up, I found very slight jacking 1 or 2mm of the back attachment point aligned the holes
This method avoids having to split any of the stubborn, hub joints
May 19, 2013
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thanks for the additional information. We appreciate it. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
jmandachuva Comments: My two pennies tip for re-installing the aluminum reinforcement plate.
DO NOT FIGHT THE METAL, DO BANG IT TOO MUCH, DO NOT DRILL OR OPEN THE HOLES.
Get an inexpensive 1/4 ton chain hoist from Harbor freight.
Take the sway bar screws off.
Tie the chain hoist between the mounts and gently crank them towards each other. This will compress them a little and the plate should fall off the studs.
Do the same for installing.
See pictures with example.
April 6, 2013
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thanks for the tip. I've not had a problem reinstalling the reinforcement plate myself. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
PTG Comments: My boxster pre-2003 uses the M8 bolts from the CV shaft to the flange. Should these M8 bolts be replaced with new bolts? I was looking at this article since I need to replace the rear wheel bearings. CV joints are fine.

Thx.
December 4, 2012
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: You do not have to replace the bolts. Unless of course the Torx head or thread is damaged. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
desertsoldier22 Comments: I replaced an entire axle this week, the biggest problem I ran into isreinstalling the chassis reinforcement plate below the transmission. The studs will not line up and I cannot get the sucker back on.Any advice would be appreciated.
September 1, 2012
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Are you installing it with the vehicle jacked up? If the wheels are not off the groud, it can be a pain to align. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Eddie986 Comments: Have a question
I need my axle boots changed on both sides. I looked at the winner'scv boots and they're fine. Just the outer axle boots need changing. First, how much grease do I need? Second, do I need to replace anything else with those? Basically, I was changing breaks and noticed both are ripped but only the outer boots are bad. Thank you.
July 13, 2012
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: When you buy a boot kit, which is what I suggest, it comes with everything you need. Boot, clamps and grease. Usually you get about 500 grams of grease, axles use about 400-500. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Mark Comments: Before I start with a cracked inner CV boot replacement, is there any lock tight needed on the CV joint bolts? Also, is there a special axle boot clamp tool needed to tighten the clamps?
April 6, 2012
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: You will need a tool to clamp down the axle boot clamp. The tool depends on the clamp style.

You do not have to use loctite on the bolts.


- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
bala Comments: Just an FYI to folks doing the regreasing of the CV. One tube of the 100 is not sufficient. Unless the method is to only coat and not pack the grase in. The article and the book don't explain how much. 1 for each end is what I can estimate based on what I have read.
March 2, 2012
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: The amount supplied witht he boot kit is what is needed. You don't have to pack it full. Depending on the axle and vehicle the kits come with anywhere from 90 to over 100 ml. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Patrick Comments: Have read the article a few times before I embark on changing the CV boots. I get the idea of dropping it at the transmission end having removed the sway bar and the exhaust, and I can see how with removal of the inner CV joint you can work backwards towards the outer one.
Why cant you use this method to remove the whole shaft from the vehicle by removing the axle nut tight! and pushing the whole shaft inwards under the gearbox. Seems this would avoid any messing with the various hub links risking putting your geometry out. And even if only for the boot change would allow an easier job by being able to get it on the bench. What have I missed?
February 21, 2012
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Without knowing what vehicle you have I cannot be very specific. However, Porsche recommends removing it with the front suspension opened up for clearance. This is the way I prefer to do it. It is much easier. If you want to give it a try without separating the ball joints, etc, go for it. Let us know how it works out. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
JS Comments: In this case, my experience is similar to ST.

The inner CV didn't come off without encouragement. I tapped at the back of the CV only the piece right around the axle-with a long drift and 5lb hammer.

I had decided to pull the whole axle to make the removal of the inner CV easier on the work bench. Unfortunately, the axle was unwilling to come free of the hub. I didn't want to get to heavy handed with the hammer and wood blocks were splitting - elected to tap the back of the CV instead.

I did remove the exhaust and lowered the sway bar, I would recommend this even for only replacing the inner boot, it seems to make the job easier because of the better access.

Thanks for all of the tech articles.
January 29, 2012
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thanks for the feedback. Glad we could help. At timet the inner does get stuck to the flange. A gentle tap usually gets it off. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
ST Comments: Just as a followup for other DIY'ers, I completed this project, but it was quite involved. The CV's did not come off easily. I had to heat them with a heat gun and used a 5lb hammer to pop them out. To install the new CV's I had to heat the CV and user a 22mm socket as a pivot to hammer the new CV's in. Heating made all the difference....

Ensure that you have all the boots and lids in place before installing the new CV as I destroyed a CV trying to take it out because I forgot to install the inner boot.
January 28, 2012
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thanks for the additional Info. We appreciate it. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
ST Comments: Hello Wayne:

I am tackling this project right now. You said the CV joint will slide off after removing the circlip. I find that it is a lot harder than that. I am afraid to hammer hard as I might damage the outer joint that is still attached to the wheel carrier. Any recommendations?

December 28, 2011
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: I would carefully tap on the inside flange to help release the bearing if it's stuck. A few taps on the inner race with a small plastic hammer may give you just the force you need. - Wayne at Pelican Parts  

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