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Pelican Technical Article:

Oil Pan Gasket Replacement / Deep Sump Installation

Time:

3 hrs

Tab:

$300

Talent:

**

Tools:

Dremmel tool

Applicable Models:

Porsche 981 Boxster (2013-14)
Porsche 981 Boxster S (2013-14)
Porsche 986 Boxster (1997-04)
Porsche 986 Boxster S (2000-04)
Porsche 987 Boxster (2005-12)
Porsche 987 Boxster S (2005-12)

Parts Required:

Deep sump kit, pickup tube extension

Hot Tip:

Add the pickup tube extension for maximum protection

Performance Gain:

Better engine protection in high G-force cornering

Complementary Modification:

Change oil
101 Performance Projects for Your Porsche Boxster

This article is one in a series that have been released in conjunction with Wayne's new book, 101 Performance Projects for Your Porsche Boxster. The book contains 312 pages of full color projects detailing everything from performance mods to changing your brake pads. With more than 950+ full-color glossy photos accompanying extensive step-by-step procedures, this book is required reading in any Boxster owner's collection. The book is currently available and in stock now. See The Official Book Website for more details.

Check out some other projects from the book:

The older Porsche 911 cars had what is known as a dry-sump oiling system. This meant that excess oil from the engine was removed (scavenged) from the bottom of the sump and stored in a separate oil tank. With a dry-sump system, a significant quantity of oil (approximately 12 quarts) is available to be supplied to the engine at all times. With a wet sump system, the oil is stored in an area below the engine. A traditional wet sump, similar to the one used on the Boxster engine, doesn't hold as much oil as a dry sump, and also may suffer from scavenging issues when the car corners and oil is sloshed from one side of the sump to the other.

As a result of the lower oil capacity of the wet sump design, it's possible that the Boxster engine may exhibit oil scavenge problems under high performance track driving. The engine is not likely to see these types of forces when driving on the street. One solution to help the problem is to lower the sump and increase its capacity. A deep sump kit extends the bottom of the engine and adds about a half a quart to the total capacity. That half quart may be just what you need in order to save your engine if your Boxster is experiencing high G-forces on the racetrack. Installation is fairly easy and can be performed on the engine with it still installed in the car. Follow the instructions shown in the photos as well as the ones included with the kit.

After emptying the engine of oil, the first step is to remove the lower engine sump cover.
Figure 1

After emptying the engine of oil, the first step is to remove the lower engine sump cover. A total of 13 bolts hold the sump cover to the engine (red arrow shows one). Remove all but two of these: loosen the last two bolts but don't remove them. This is to keep the sump plate from falling on you when you pry it free. Have a large drip tray handy when you remove the sump cover, as there will some excess oil that will drip out of the engine. To remove the sump cover, use a prybar between the two bosses located near the oil filter (yellow arrow). Some light tapping with a rubber mallet might help as well. Do not place any tools on the mounting surfaces of the sump plate or the engine. The engine sump plate sandwiches itself between the case and the stock lower sump as shown by the green arrow.

Remove the black plastic baffle from the bottom sump plate.
Figure 2

Remove the black plastic baffle from the bottom sump plate. The six "windows" on the baffle should be enlarged slightly in order to gain the maximum performance from your additional sump. Using a Dremmel tool, carefully modify the baffle, removing about an 1/8th of an inch from the bottom of each window. The inset photo shows the first window modified (yellow arrow). Only take off a small amount of material here: you must leave enough material on the bottom so that the flaps will still seat on the raised bottom lip.

Install the baffle spacer onto the bottom of the sump plate.
Figure 3

Install the baffle spacer onto the bottom of the sump plate. Make sure that the two small tabs line up with the fin that is cast into the bottom of the sump plate (yellow arrow). Install the plastic baffle onto the spacer using the bolts supplied with the kit. Use some Loctite threadlocker on the screws as you install them. Do not use any gasket sealant on the baffle extension. When you remove your old sump, be sure to carefully clean both the engine side and the sump plate so that you can reseal the sandwich plate upon installation. After meticulously cleaning the two mounting surfaces, I used Loctite 5900 to seal the flange surfaces.

Shown here is the Brey-Krause deep sump kit that we used for this project.
Figure 4

Shown here is the Brey-Krause deep sump kit that we used for this project. This high quality kit is available from PelicanParts.com and comes complete with the sump spacer, the baffle spacer and the appropriate mounting hardware.

Shown here are the lower sump air-oil separators, which help to de-foam the oil in the bottom of the sump.
Figure 5

Shown here are the lower sump air-oil separators, which help to de-foam the oil in the bottom of the sump. They are held on with two bolts each (green arrows), but seldom need replacing. I would recommend that you replace them if you had some type of major engine failure at one time that might have contaminated them (inset photo shows them removed). For the installation of this kit, I chose to add the oil pickup tube spacer, manufactured by LN Engineering (inset photo). This spacer lowers the oil pickup tube all the way down to the bottom of the sump when the deep sump kit is installed. This allows the maximum amount of oil to be sucked up by the oil pumps (cost is approximately $30). The yellow arrows point to the attachment points for the oil pickup tube.

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Comments and Suggestions:
Jim Comments: I recently bought a couple of AOS units from you for my 2000 Boxster S. But, I cannot find the torque specs for the sump cover or the AOS units anywhere. Would you happen to know what they are? Thanks for any help.
Jim
December 2, 2012
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Those are 6MM bolts. Normal torque for 6MM is 10NM or 7 foot pounds.

- Denny at Pelican Parts
 
Jim Comments: I recently bought a couple of AOS units from you for my 2000 Boxster S. But, I cannot find the torque specs for the sump cover or the AOS units anywhere. Would you happen to know what they are? Thanks for any help.
Jim
November 13, 2012
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Those are 6MM bolts. Normal torque for 6MM is 10NM or 7 foot pounds.

- Denny at Pelican Parts
 

Check out some other projects from the book:


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