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Pelican Technical Article:
Boxster Engine Swap / Carrera Engine Conversion Project
 

 
Time: 150 hrs
Tab: $10K
Talent: 
Tools:
All of them
Applicable Models:
986 Boxster (1997-04)
987 Boxster (2005-08)
Parts Required:
A bigger engine
Hot Tip:
Read this article carefully and ask specific questions on the Pelican Parts Boxster forum
Performance Gain:
Gobs more horsepower
Complementary Modification:
Clutch replacement, suspension upgrade, brake upgrade.
 
  

 This article is one in a series that have been released in conjunction with Wayne's new book, 101 Performance Projects for Your Porsche Boxster.  The book contains 312 pages of full color projects detailing everything from performance mods to changing your brake pads.   With more than 950+ full-color glossy photos accompanying extensive step-by-step procedures, this book is required reading in any Boxster owner's collection. The book is currently available and in stock now. See The Official Book Website for more details.
 

Check out some other sample projects from the book: 

Need to buy parts for this project? Click here to order!
  
     One of the great features about the Boxster is that it shares so many parts with its bigger brother, the Carrera. As Boxsters get more and more affordable, a growing number of owners are choosing to upgrade the engine in their Boxster with a bigger and more powerful unit from one of Carreras. The Boxster engine and the Carrera engine are almost exact the same: the Carrera is basically just a larger displacement version of the Boxster engine. As a result of these similarities, the conversion process is relatively easy to perform, and is a very rewarding project for the do-it-yourselfer.

     One of the toughest aspects of performing an engine conversion on the Boxster is figuring out which engines will fit into which chassis. There has been no definitive resource detailing this, so I decided to compile the information here. Working closely with Boxster conversion guru Todd Holyoak, I've managed to compile the following list of compatible engine / chassis combinations. Keep in mind that this is only an overview, and some additional research may be needed when installing an engine into your particular chassis. Information on these conversions is always evolving: be sure to check out the 101Projects.com website for updates on the latest conversion swap techniques.

     I realize that an ideal engine swap would increase the displacement of the engine and increase power. However, it may be the case that you have a Boxster with a blown engine, and you find a used engine from a different year that may also fit. The following list also covers Boxster-to-Boxster engine swaps as well as the more popular Boxster-to-Carrera 996/997 engine swaps.

     All of the swaps require a remapping of computer program inside the DME. DME is short for Digital Motor Electronics and is the computer brain that controls the ignition and fuel injection system for the engine. The software that controls the DME is called Motronic, and each engine displacement has it's own map: a set of instructions that tell the computer how to drive the engine. When performing a swap, you need to upgrade your map, either by using the factory PST-2 programming tool, or by using an aftermarket software company like Softronic (see Pelican Technical Article: Installing Performance DME Map Software).

Boxster 1997-99 (2.5L)
  • The Boxster 1997-99 chassis can accept any Carrera 996 3.4L engine, or can use any Boxster engine from 1997-2002. In 2003, Porsche switched to a vane-cell adjuster mechanism to control the variable camshaft timing, and this system requires the later DME running Motronic version 7.8. Unless you upgrade the car to use the later DME (very difficult), you cannot use any 2002 or later 996 Carrera engine or any 2003 or later Boxster engine. You can swap in any replacement 2.5L engine from 1997-99 without having to remap the DME.
     
  • These cars ran the Bosch Motronic 5.2.2 system, which uses a cable-driven throttle body, similar to nearly all earlier Porsches. When installing an engine into one of these early cars, you need to use a cable-driven throttle body and corresponding crossover tube that matches that engine. (I.E. use the cable-driven throttle body from a 1999 996 Carrera when installing a 3.4 engine: the standard 2.5L throttle body is too small). The Boxster cable attaches directly to the 996 throttle body with no modifications necessary.
     
  • Very early 1997 cars had non-programmable DMEs. If you have one of these cars, you might need to purchase a new DME and matching immobilizer to go along with it. Immobilizer codes for these early cars are not stored in the Porsche dealer information system, so there's no way of linking the existing immobilizer to a new DME. Don't buy a 1997 if you are definitely planning on doing an upgrade as you might get stuck with one of these non-programmable DMEs.
     
  • Installing a 996/997 3.6 or 3.8 engine or 2003-08 Boxster/Cayman engine is very difficult on these early cars, as you need to manually update many other systems in the car to get them to work properly. These later engines used Vario-Cam Plus, which is a system for controlling variable valve lift. You need to install a late-model DME and run Motronic 7.8 in order to control the variable valve lift properly. It is possible to run a piggyback computer that independently controls the variable valve lift, but this solution is not ideal and is complex to implement.
     
  • Boxster engines from 2000-02 and all 996 engines have an extra crossover tube with a variable resonance flap that is controlled by the DME. When you reflash your 5.2.2 DME to control the new engine, you also need to add some wires to the DME harness. The resonance flap is controlled by a solenoid switch that then applies vacuum to the flapper. You wire this solenoid by running one wire to a 12V source and the other wire to pin 59 on the DME (the DME controls the valve with a switchable ground).

Boxster 2000 (2.7L & 3.2 S)

  • The Boxster 2000 chassis can accept any Carrera 996 3.4L engine, or can use any Boxster engine from 1997-2002. In 2003, Porsche switched to a vane-cell adjuster mechanism to control the variable camshaft timing, and this system requires the later DME running Motronic 7.8. Unless you upgrade the car to use the later DME (very difficult), you cannot use any 2002 or later 996 Carrera engine or any 2003 or later Boxster engine. You can swap in any replacement engine of the same displacement from 2000-02 without having to remap the DME. (I.E. a 2000 2.7L Boxster with a blown motor can accept a 2002 2.7L engine with no remapping needed). Installation of a 3.2 Boxster ‘S' engine would be an easy installation, but would require an updated map for the DME.
     
  • These cars ran the Bosch Motronic 7.2 system, which uses an electronic throttle body, linked to an electronic gas pedal (also known as drive-by-wire). When installing an engine into one of these cars, you need to use an electronic throttle body and corresponding crossover tube that matches that engine. (I.E. use the electronic throttle body from a 2000 or later 996 Carrera when installing a 3.4 engine).
     
  • If for some reason, you want to back-date the engine to a smaller displacement 2.5L engine, then you will have to use the injection system and DME map from a 2.7L engine. The 2.5L engine injection doesn't have the extra cross-over tube on the intake, and also has the cable-driven throttle body, which is not compatible with the electronic throttle 7.2 DME.
     
  • Installing a 996/997 3.6 or 3.8 engine or 2003-08 Boxster/Cayman engine is very difficult on these cars, as you need to manually update many other systems in the car to get them to work properly. These later engines used Vario-Cam Plus, which is a system for controlling variable valve lift. You need to run Motronic 7.8 in order to control the variable valve lift properly. It is possible to run a piggyback computer that independently controls the variable valve lift, but this solution is not ideal and is complex to implement.

Boxster 2001 (2.7L & 3.2 S)

  • The Boxster 2001 cars are by far the most flexible in which engine you can install in them. The 2001 cars still have the 7.2 DME installed, but most of the other systems of the car were upgraded in anticipation of moving towards the 2002 CAN bus system that integrates various electronic systems on the car. With the exception of the anti-lock braking system, the proper CAN bus systems are integrated into the 2001 chassis and allow the easy installation of the later 7.8 DME. As a result, you can install any 1997-08 Boxster or 996 Carrera motor into these cars without too much difficulty. You can swap in any replacement engine of the same displacement from 2000-02 without having to remap the DME. (for example, a 2001 3.2L Boxster with a blown motor can accept a 2002 3.2L engine with no remapping needed).
     
  • These cars ran the Bosch Motronic 7.2 system, which uses an electronic throttle body, linked to an electronic gas pedal (also known as drive-by-wire). When installing an engine into one of these cars, you need to use an electronic throttle body and corresponding crossover tube that matches that engine. (I.E. use the electronic throttle body from a 2000 or later 996 Carrera when installing a 3.4 engine).
     
  • If for some reason, you want / need to back-date the engine to a smaller displacement 2.5L engine, then you will have to use the injection system and DME map from a 2.7L engine. The 2.5L engine injection doesn't have the extra cross-over tube on the intake, and also has the cable-driven throttle body, which is not compatible with the electronic throttle 7.2 DME.
     
  • To install a Carrera 996/997 3.6/3.8 engine or a 2003-08 Boxster/Cayman engine into one of these cars, you need to purchase a new 7.8 DME and then slightly modify the pinouts on the DME connector. In addition, you need to modify the Boxster engine wire harness, as the camshaft position sensors are located on the opposite ends of the engine than on the 5-chain early motors. All of the systems on the car should work normally with one exception: the cruise control will not work properly with the later 7.8 DME unless you upgrade your ABS system as well (swap out the ABS controller and connector).

Boxster 2002 (2.7L & 3.2 S)

  • The 2002 Boxster is somewhat unique in that it has an older-style 7.2 DME combined with the 2002 CAN BUS system that integrates various electronic systems on the car. As a result, if you wish to install a 3.4L Carrera 996 engine, you will need a custom DME remap from a third party vendor like Softronic (see Pelican Technical Article: Installing Performance DME Map Software). The best solution for these cars is to swap in a Carrera 996/997 3.6/3.8 engine or a 2002-08 Boxster/Cayman engine. You can swap in any replacement engine of the same displacement from 2000-02 without having to remap the DME. (I.E. a 2002 Boxster 2.7L with a blown motor can accept a 2000 2.7L engine with no remapping needed).
     
  • To install a Carrera 996/997 3.6/3.8 engine or a 2003-08 Boxster/Cayman engine into one of these cars, you need to purchase a new 7.8 DME, and then slightly modify the pinouts on the DME connector. In addition, you need to modify / extend the Boxster engine wire harness, as the camshaft position sensors are located on the opposite ends of the engine than on the 5-chain early motors (also the new camshaft adjusters have different connectors). All of the systems on the car should work normally with the later-style 7.8 DME (2002 has ABS version 5.7 so it does not have the same issues with the cruise control as the 2001 model). If you are installing an engine with Variocam Plus (all Carrera 3.6/3.8 and Boxster 2007-08), you will also need to add in the wiring to control the variable valve timing.
     
  • If for some reason, you want / need to back-date the engine to a smaller displacement 2.5L engine, then you will have to use the injection system and DME map from a 2.7L engine. The 2.5L engine injection doesn't have the extra cross-over tube on the intake, and also has the cable-driven throttle body, which is not compatible with the electronic throttle 7.2 DME.

Boxster & Cayman 2003-08 (2.7L / 2.9L / 3.2 S)

  • The 2003 and later Boxster and Cayman cars can accept any 996/997 3.6 Carrera engine, and any Boxster or Cayman engine from 2003 and later. The best solution for more horsepower is to swap in a 3.6 or 3.8 996 or 997 engine. You can swap in any replacement engine of the same displacement from 2003-08 without having to remap the DME. (I.E. a 2003 Boxster 2.7L with a blown motor can accept a 2005 2.7L engine with no remapping needed).
     
  • On the 2004 and later cars with traction control, the installation of a more powerful engine into the drivetrain may cause the traction control system to become confused. You may need to upgrade some of the components of the system to the later 997 specification in order to achieve proper operation of the system with your new engine.
     
  • The 2007-08 Boxster engines were the first of the series to get Variocam Plus (variable valve lift). The Carrera 996 had Variocam Plus since the introduction of the 3.6L engine in 2002. The 7.8 DME used in the 2003-06 Boxster didn't control variable valve lift, and there are no pins or wires in the engine harness to control the mechanism. Therefore, you need to add the wires into the engine harness when performing this installation. Pins A1 on both valve lift controllers connect to a 12V source in the harness: use the 12V supply for the variable valve timing solenoid. Pins A2 on the controllers connect to DME connector pin C1 for cylinders 1-3 and pin C26 for cylinders 4-6.

Additional Notes

    Fuel Return System - Starting in 2002, Porsche modified the fuel system in the Boxster to have a non-return type system. On 1997-01 cars, the fuel was pumped from the tank to the engine and back in a circulating pattern. In 2002, the return line back to the tank was eliminated. When you install a non-return fuel system engine into a return system chassis, there are two different options you can take. The first option is to swap out the fuel pump and sending unit with one from a 2003 or later Boxster and use the system as a non-return system. In this scenario, you would use the existing fuel rails from the non-return engine.

     For the second option, you can use the return system fuel rails and injectors and simply disconnect the vacuum line from the fuel pressure regulator. The base pressure for the return fuel system without the vacuum hooked up is the same as the fixed fuel pressure on the non-return systems. This second option is the least expensive of the two, but the better solution is the first option, as you can then run the later-style EV6 fuel injectors as they were intended to be run with your new engine.

     Vacuum Pump - Starting in 2005, the Boxster is equipped with a vacuum pump that is powered off of the camshaft. This pump was added in order to provide the engine a more constant source of vacuum, which would be independent of the throttle position and other environmental conditions. When installing one of these vacuum-pump equipped engines into an earlier car, simply hook up the vacuum supply for the brake booster, and the secondary plenum resonance valve to this vacuum source.

     Engine Oil Dip Stick - 2005 and later Boxsters have no dipstick. Instead the oil level is monitored electronically. When installing one of the later-style M96 motors into an early car, there is typically a black plastic plug that covers the dipstick hole: install your old dipstick into this location. On the M97 motors, there is no mounting boss for the dipstick, so you will have to rely on the instrument gauge.

     A/C Compressor - Since the air conditioning compressor stays with the chassis when performing an engine swap, it's important to note that all the A/C compressors from 1997-08 appear to be compatible with all of the available engines. Some massaging of the A/C lines may be necessary to make them fit around the particular bosses and mounting points of some of the engines. In particular, the biggest hurdles are encountered when installing a 3-chain vane cell engine into an early car. The 3-chain engines have a different style casting round the end of the cylinder heads. This can be overcome if you use the parts from a 3-chain motor when installing the engine into an earlier chassis (power steering supply and return lines).

     Electrical Diagrams - When converting from a Motronic 7.2 to Motronic 7.8 conversion, there are some changes that need to be made to the engine wiring harnesses in order to interface with the 7.8 DME.  In order to assist you in rewiring your harness, I have uploaded the following electrical diagrams:

     Wayne's 3.4L conversion - I took about 2000 or so photos documenting the entire conversion process here: it was quite difficult to whittle them down to a mere 65 or so. However, I've archived all of the photos on the book's official website 101Projects.com, so I advise you to point your computer there and browse through them so that you can learn more about the process and what's required to perform the swap. Keep in mind that I installed a 1999 3.4 factory rebuilt engine into a 2000 Boxster chassis. Your particular car and engine combination will most likely be different and will probably have some differences that are not captured here in these photos. The Boxster discussion forums on the PelicanParts.com website are an excellent place to ask specific questions regarding your particular installation: I'm there answering questions almost every day.

The Carrera 996 engine incorporates a completely different method of mounting and securing the engine to the chassis (yellow arrow).
Figure 1
The Carrera 996 engine incorporates a completely different method of mounting and securing the exhaust system to the engine (yellow arrow). These large, heavy muffler brackets need to be removed from both sides of the engine: they are attached with bolts, three of which are shown by the green arrows.
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With the large motor mount bracket removed, there is a smaller bracket that needs to be removed from each side as well.
Figure 2
With the large muffler bracket removed, there is a smaller bracket that needs to be removed from each side as well. This top bracket is difficult to remove because you need to loosen and/or remove the black plastic intake manifold and the aluminum intake manifold (green arrow) in order to remove the bolts (yellow arrow). This would probably be a good time to replace the seals that mate the aluminum intake manifold to the engine case. It's also a wise idea to stuff a few paper towels in the open intake pipes when you've reattached the manifold, just to make sure you don't drop any screws or washers down there while working on the engine.
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There are a set of hoses that run across the top of the motor and connect to the air/oil separator that are not used with the Boxster.
Figure 3
There are a set of hoses that run across the top of the motor and connect to the air/oil separator that are not used with the Boxster. Disconnect the hoses attached to the air-oil separator (green arrows), disconnect the small water hose from the front (see next photo), and then lift up and remove the bundle from the engine (red arrow). You will not be using the smaller coolant hoses with the 996 air-oil separator: you can simply leave these small ports open or place some small plastic plugs on them.
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Disconnect the coolant hose from the connection on the front of the engine (yellow arrow).
Figure 4
Disconnect the coolant hose from the connection on the front of the engine (yellow arrow). If you are using an electronic throttle body (2000 and later Boxsters), you won't be using the air/oil separator hose that comes with the 996 engine, so disconnect it from the intake crossover tube as shown in the inset photo (green arrow).
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When installing a Carrera 996 engine into the Boxster, you typically use the 996 intake manifold.
Figure 5
When installing a Carrera 996 engine into the Boxster, you typically use the 996 intake manifold. However, you need to remove it from the engine and then reinstall it later on in the opposite direction. This is so the throttle body will face the rear of the car. I suggest that you take many photos as you remove the manifold, as the routing of the vacuum hoses can be tricky to decipher when you're reassembling the manifold back onto the engine.
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When you reinstall the manifold back onto the engine, you should point the throttle body towards the flywheel end.
Figure 6
When you reinstall the manifold back onto the engine, you should point the throttle body towards the flywheel end. Also be sure that the intake boots with the small vacuum ports (green arrow) are located on either side of the throttle body and point downwards in the manner shown. The intake manifold is attached to the aluminum manifold via a number of small torx bolts (inset photo).
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Figuring out where to plug in all of the little plastic vacuum hoses took quite a long time for me, so I decided to create this vacuum plug chart to assist during the reassembly process.
Figure 7
Figuring out where to plug in all of the little plastic vacuum hoses took quite a long time for me, so I decided to create this vacuum plug chart to assist during the reassembly process. Follow the diagram here when replumbing your engine. Fuel rail Intake rubber sleeve with vacuum port (installed on right side of throttle body) Fuel pressure regulator on fuel rail Air injection pump valve Electronic vacuum solenoid valve for air injection pump valve Vacuum reservoir 4-way vacuum tee Vacuum check valve (black side points towards the manifold) 3-way vacuum tee (one side is plugged) Electronic vacuum solenoid valve for resonance flap valve Resonance flap valve Intake rubber sleeve with vacuum port (installed on left side of throttle body)
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You won't be using the Carrera 996 engine wire harness in your Boxster, so you will need to remove it from the engine (and later on, install your old Boxster harness, see <a href=# style=color:000080 id='In_text_39' onClick=PopUpMessage('In_text_39','images_small/Pic039.
Figure 8
You won't be using the Carrera 996 engine wire harness in your Boxster, so you will need to remove it from the engine (and later on, install your old Boxster harness, see Figure 39). Unplug all of the electrical connections from the various components and then pull it off of the engine.
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This photo shows the Carrera 996 wire harness that is no longer used.
Figure 9
This photo shows the Carrera 996 wire harness that is no longer used. The Boxster harness is very similar, but it plugs directly into the DME in the rear trunk, instead of a set of connectors in the engine compartment like the 996.
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The Carrera 996 engine has an electrical junction box (red arrow) that needs to be moved to the standard location on the Boxster (near the power steering pump, see next photo).
Figure 10
The Carrera 996 engine has an electrical junction box (red arrow) that needs to be moved to the standard location on the Boxster (near the power steering pump, see next photo). I recommend that you use the starter harness from the 996 which is longer than the Boxster harness. I found that the junction box was a bit in the way on my installation, and I found that I had more clearance if I turned it around (see next photo). The inset photo shows the starter switch connection, which must be attached properly to the starter terminal.
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Shown here is the 996 starter / alternator harness (yellow) and relocated electrical junction box (green).
Figure 11
Shown here is the 996 starter / alternator harness (yellow) and relocated electrical junction box (green). Although the 996 harness is a bit longer, I simply tucked the extra wires up in a loop on top of the engine. The inset photo in the upper right shows the original junction box attached to the top of the Boxster engine. When installing the engine into the car, I actually found that the junction box had the potential to interfere with the resonance flapper valve, so I turned it around (inset lower right), and also had to add a few washers underneath (inset, upper left).
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The Boxster uses an oil pressure switch to detect low oil pressure in the engine.
Figure 12
The Boxster uses an oil pressure switch to detect low oil pressure in the engine. The Carrera 996 engine uses a combination unit that senses pressure and also includes a low-pressure switch as well. The unit needs to be moved from one side of the 996 engine to the other side (the unit is installed on the right side of the engine when it is installed in the Boxster). Remove the plug from one side of the engine, and then swap places with the oil pressure sending unit as shown. Use new sealing rings to guard against oil leaks. Grab the sender by the base using a wrench: don't grab it by the canister, otherwise you may damage the unit and cause it to leak. In order to hook it up to your Boxster harness, install a spade tab on the unit if it doesn't already have one (shown in the upper inset photo). Even though the Boxster doesn't have a gauge in the dash to monitor oil pressure, you should utilize the 996 sender in case you ever decide to upgrade to the 996 gauge cluster (see Pelican Technical Article: 996 Gauge Cluster Upgrade).
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Both the oil filler tube and the oil dipstick tube are different on the 996 engine, so you need to swap them out with the ones from your Boxster engine.
Figure 13
Both the oil filler tube and the oil dipstick tube are different on the 996 engine, so you need to swap them out with the ones from your Boxster engine. The photo shows the mounting bolt for the oil filler tube (yellow arrow), and the dipstick (green arrow): install them as shown in the inset photos, and use new seals. Inspect the oil filler tube for cracks prior to installation: these can cause vacuum leaks that can affect engine performance.
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There are a few items on the front of the engine that need to be swapped with pieces from your donor Boxster engine.
Figure 14
There are a few items on the front of the engine that need to be swapped with pieces from your donor Boxster engine. The font water pipe connections are different on the two engines: the inset photo shows the 996 parts that need to swapped out for the Boxster parts. Swap the 996 part shown by the green arrow with the cap (yellow arrow) from your Boxster engine. Swap the 996 part shown by the orange arrow with the pipe connector (blue arrow) from the Boxster engine. Use new gaskets to seal these two parts to the engine.
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The front of the 996 engine has a water hose cap and connector piece that needs to be replaced with the one from the Boxster (red arrow).
Figure 15
The front of the 996 engine has a water hose cap and connector piece that needs to be replaced with the one from the Boxster (red arrow). Begin by removing the idler pulley that blocks access to the lower bolt (yellow arrow and inset photo). Then, remove the cap by removing the bolts.
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Here's the Boxster water cap installed in place (red arrow).
Figure 16
Here's the Boxster water cap installed in place (red arrow). The green arrow in the inset photo shows where it mounts to the engine: use a new gasket when transferring over the Boxster piece. Inspect the radiator hose that mounts to the Boxster piece as well, and replace it if it looks old. Don't forget to reinstall the idler pulley back onto its boss (purple arrow) when you are finished.
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Except for some early cars, most Boxster and Carrera 996 engines have four mounting points for the engine mount.
Figure 17
Except for some early cars, most Boxster and Carrera 996 engines have four mounting points for the engine mount. Although you can get by with three, I don't necessarily recommend it, especially when installing a higher power engine. If your 996 Carrera engine does not have this fourth engine mounting boss (yellow arrow), then you need to remove the oil pump and housing from your Boxster engine and transfer it over to your 996 engine. If your original Boxster engine also doesn't have this fourth mounting boss, then I recommend you purchase the later-style oil pump with the boss integrated within the housing.
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The Carrera 996 engines use studs to mount the front engine bar: the Boxster uses bolts.
Figure 18
The Carrera 996 engines use studs to mount the front engine bar: the Boxster uses bolts. Therefore you need to remove the studs from the front of the engine with a good quality stud remover (see inset photo). The yellow arrow in the main photo shows the fourth boss used for the engine mount. On my 1999 3.4 996 engine, this fourth boss was already installed, because this was a brand new Porsche factory rebuilt motor that had all of the later upgrades installed on it.
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Shown here is the Boxster mount test fitted to the front of the 996 engine.
Figure 19
Shown here is the Boxster mount test fitted to the front of the 996 engine. I recommend removing the mount, mating it to the other half, and then installing it after the engine has been positioned into the car (see Pelican Technical Article: Replacing Motor Mounts).
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Converting over your engine is a somewhat lengthy process.
Figure 20
Converting over your engine is a somewhat lengthy process. I recommend doing it over several weeks: plan on spending an hour or two a night carefully cleaning up parts and swapping them over from the old engine. Even though I was writing this book and taking photos at the same time, I found it took me a lot longer than I expected to prep the engine. A glass of wine helps, and the oil cooler makes for a nice wine glass stand!
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You need to swap out the power steering lines from the Boxster engine over to the 996 Carrera engine.
Figure 21
You need to swap out the power steering lines from the Boxster engine over to the 996 Carrera engine. The return line, shown here, can be somewhat difficult to remove. Using a wrench, carefully press in on the red plastic tab shown by the green arrow, and pull out the line from the rear. Use caution: if you damage the red connector, then you will need to replace the whole rear pump reservoir, which is not an easy task. Disconnect the line and then install the existing one from your donor Boxster engine.
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Here's a photo showing the two Boxster power steering lines installed (pressure line: yellow arrow, return line: blue arrow).
Figure 22
Here's a photo showing the two Boxster power steering lines installed (pressure line: yellow arrow, return line: blue arrow). The pressure line is attached with a typical brake line-style fitting (inset photo). Use a flare-nut wrench (not shown) to remove the line to avoid damaging the fitting. Be sure to transfer over the proper mounting brackets for the lines as well (purple arrows).
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The top power steering reservoir is different on the Carrera 996 engine.
Figure 23
The top power steering reservoir is different on the Carrera 996 engine. Remove it from the motor by loosening up the locking dial shown by the yellow arrow. Don't install the Boxster unit just yet: leave it off until the engine is installed into the car. It's a smart idea to replace the o-ring that mates the reservoir with the pump at this time.
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With the 996 engine on the stand, it's a good time to install the headers onto the engine.
Figure 24
With the 996 engine on the stand, it's a good time to install the headers onto the engine. Shown here are some very nice looking stainless steel, large-diameter headers that match the original 3.4L exhaust system. Although I installed these with the engine on the stand, I ended up using a high performance Fabspeed exhaust instead in the final assembly (see Pelican Technical Article: Installing a Performance Exhaust System). Make sure that you use a new exhaust gasket (inset photo), and also use the proper exhaust hardware (blue arrow).
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With the engine wire harness installed, you can also plug in the first set of oxygen sensors.
Figure 25
With the engine wire harness installed, you can also plug in the first set of oxygen sensors. I recommend only using Genuine Porsche or OEM Bosch sensors due to a problem with splicing in connectors: see Project 19 for more details.
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This photo shows the auxiliary air valve that connects to the air pump located on the right side of the Boxster engine compartment.
Figure 26
This photo shows the auxiliary air valve that connects to the air pump located on the right side of the Boxster engine compartment. The valve is the same on the Boxster and 996 engines, but you need to transfer over the s-shaped hose from the Boxster engine to your 996 engine.
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Shown here is the auxiliary air ‘S' hose installed along with the intake manifold.
Figure 27
Shown here is the auxiliary air ‘S' hose installed along with the intake manifold. You need to install the hose first, and then install the manifold, snaking the hose through the opening as shown. When the engine is installed in the car, connect this hose to the air pump located on the right side of the Boxster engine compartment.
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The Carrera 996 engine has an oil cooler that is much taller than the Boxster one.
Figure 28
The Carrera 996 engine has an oil cooler that is much taller than the Boxster one. As a result, you may have a difficult time fitting your air intake tube around it. If you do, then the solution is to swap it out with the shorter Boxster oil cooler (inset photo).  However, I would keep the 996 one in place if at all possible, as more cooling is definitely better.
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When you swap out your oil cooler, be sure to use new oil cooler seals to assure a leak-free installation (yellow arrows).
Figure 29
It's a smart idea to remove the cooler and install new oil cooler seals to assure a leak-free engine (yellow arrows).
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The 996 engine has a resonance flapper valve installed in the rear intake manifold crossover tube.
Figure 30
The 996 engine has a resonance flapper valve installed in the rear intake manifold crossover tube. For the purposes of engine installation into the Boxster, I recommend that you point this valve up as high as it can go (inset photo), and also keep all of the intake tube connections loose so that you can rotate both the valve and the throttle body during the engine installation.
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As mentioned previously, there are several miniature plastic vacuum hoses that need to be routed from the intake manifold.
Figure 31
As mentioned previously, there are several miniature plastic vacuum hoses that need to be routed from the intake manifold. Two of the rubber boots will have plugs for the vacuum lines. Install and point them downwards as shown to ease installation (red arrow).
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Here's a side view of a miniature plastic vacuum hose plugged into the rubber connection boot for the intake manifold.
Figure 32
Here's a side view of a miniature plastic vacuum hose plugged into the rubber connection boot for the intake manifold. As you can see, the tube slightly sticks out of the boot as shown by the purple arrow). The inset photo shows the inside of the resonance flapper valve when it's fully opened. When the engine is installed in the car, you need to make sure that this valve has full freedom of motion and is not constrained by any hoses or wires.
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Shown here is the stock configuration of the throttle body for the Carrera 996 cable-driven engine.
Figure 33
Shown here is the stock configuration of the throttle body for the Carrera 996 cable-driven engine. The crossover piece (purple arrow) where the throttle body mounts is different for the cable or electronic throttle bodies, so you need to obtain and use the proper one for your car. For the electronic throttle body, I was able to flip the crossover piece around (see the next photos). If you have a 1997-99 Boxster with the cable-driven throttle body, you will need to install the throttle body in its standard position. In addition, you will need to use the stock Boxster air-oil separator connection piece and plug the tank vent hose into the nipple on the throttle body.
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This photo shows me removing the crossover tube that is specific to the cable-driven throttle body.
Figure 34
This photo shows me removing the crossover tube that is specific to the cable-driven throttle body. I replaced this with the crossover tube that is used with the electronic throttle body, and I installed it 180 degrees from normal in order to ease the connection to the air-oil separator (see Figure 37). The inset photo shows the engine compartment temperature sensor, which should be mounted on the manifold that is located on the right side of the engine compartment (when you flip around the 996 manifold, it should be on the correct side).
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This photo shows the stock configuration of the Carrera 996 throttle body crossover tube and the air-oil separator.
Figure 35
This photo shows the stock configuration of the Carrera 996 throttle body crossover tube and the air-oil separator. For installation in the Boxster, I removed the crossover tube, flipped it over and then fabricated a simple connecting piece from an angled radiator hose I found at my local auto parts store (inset photo). I used the two connector pieces from the original plastic, semi-flexible air-oil separator hose used on the Boxster. The stock Boxster air-oil separator hose almost fit, but it was slightly cocked at an angle, which would have created a vacuum leak.
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Shown here is the electronic throttle body installed on the flipped-over crossover tube.
Figure 36
Shown here is the electronic throttle body installed on the flipped-over crossover tube. The green arrow points to the stock Boxster air-oil separator connection tube, which doesn't quite fit: a custom piece had to be fabricated (see Photo 35 and Figure 37). The inset photo shows the mounting point for the throttle body: use a new rubber gasket to prevent any vacuum leaks.
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This photo shows the new air-oil separator hose installed.
Figure 37
This photo shows the new air-oil separator hose installed. The green arrow shows the connector to the crossover pipe, the yellow arrow shows the connector to the air-oil separator unit. The red arrow points to the gas tank vent hose which connects to the valve shown in the next photo (Figure 38).
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The gas tank vent valve is electronically controlled: the wire harness connection is shown by the yellow arrow and the blue arrow (inset photo).
Figure 38
The gas tank vent valve is electronically controlled: the wire harness connection is shown by the yellow arrow and the blue arrow (inset photo). The vent tube hose (green arrow) leads back to a small port on the throttle body (see next photo). You need to make sure that you properly position and secure the vent valve prior to installing the engine, as it's very difficult to reach under the manifold with the engine installed in the car.
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When installing the Boxster wire harness onto the 996 engine, you will most likely find that the lengths of some wires are not quite right.
Figure 39
When installing the Boxster wire harness onto the 996 engine, you will most likely find that the lengths of some wires are not quite right. You will need to peel back the insulation on the wire harness and separate out the wires (blue arrow - for the engine compartment temperature sensor in this case). Use some high-quality electrical tape to rewrap the wires that are exposed (inset photo). I also used some very small zip ties to keep the harness together, just in case the electrical tape started to lose its stickiness at some time in the future.
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On the opposite side of the engine, I found that I had to separate the wires a bit for the connection to the solenoid that controls the resonance flapper valve (mounted on the end of the manifold: yellow arrow).
Figure 40
On the opposite side of the engine, I found that I had to separate the wires a bit for the connection to the solenoid that controls the resonance flapper valve (mounted on the end of the manifold: yellow arrow). Again, peel back the insulation (orange arrow), separate the wires (purple arrow), and then rewrap the harness with high-quality electrical tape. At this time, I also found it very useful to dig out my label printer and make some labels for each of the wires on the harness. This helps with routing and the reassembly process.
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Install and route the engine wire harness following how it was installed on your Boxster motor.
Figure 41
Install and route the engine wire harness following how it was installed on your Boxster motor. The 996 has different attachment and holding points for the harnesses, so use a generous amount of plastic zip ties to secure it in place. Don't forget to attach the very important ground points for the harness (inset photo, lower left). Also, take care when attaching the alternator harness: messing this up can literally cause a meltdown when you reconnect the battery.
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Figuring out what to do with the fuel rails was a challenging part of this conversion.
Figure 42
Figuring out what to do with the fuel rails was a challenging part of this conversion. While the process of adapting the fuel rails to the 996 engine is not difficult, there are several paths you can take. The path I chose here seemed to be the least complicated at the time, but as I write about it, it would seem there might be an easier solution: I just haven't figured it out quite yet (check the 101 Projects website for additional suggestions on how to handle the fuel rails). The first step I took was to completely remove the fuel rails from the 996 engine. This is accomplished by removing the bolts that hold the rails to the manifold and pulling both the rails and injectors from the engine. The inset photo shows the 996 injectors and rails removed. The red arrow points to the return line connection for the 996 engine.
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The inset photo shows the Boxster rails lined up next to the 996 rails: they don't line up.
Figure 43
The inset photo shows the Boxster rails lined up next to the 996 rails: they don't line up. In order to use the Boxster rails with the 996 manifold, you would need to grind off of the mounting tabs on the Boxster rails, and then reweld them into the proper position for the 996 engine. I'm not a huge fan of welding fuel rails, so I decided I didn't care for this approach. Instead I modified the 996 rails and the chassis Boxster fuel lines instead. Shown here is the “left” side of the 996 fuel rail where I cut the secondary fuel rail off and also removed the second crossover fuel hose.
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This photo shows the existing 996 fuel hose and the additional high pressure fuel hose that I ran across the top of the engine.
Figure 44
This photo shows the existing 996 fuel hose and the additional high pressure fuel hose that I ran across the top of the engine. When installing the engine into your engine bay, be sure that you confirm that the fuel hose is not rubbing on any other items, or is coming in contact with any component that may cause it to wear. After installing the engine in the car, I went back and covered the fuel hose with a hard plastic sheath to protect it from any rubbing or vibration in the engine compartment. I used the flexible plastic conduit material that you commonly use to bundle and protect electrical wires automotive applications (upper inset photo). The lower inset photo shows the 8x13mm high pressure BMW fuel hose that I used to replumb the fuel lines.
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Shown here is the “right” side of the engine as it is installed into the Boxster.
Figure 45
Shown here is the “right” side of the engine as it is installed into the Boxster. I carefully trimmed off the pre-fabricated fuel line that was attached to the barb on the fuel rail (inset). Then I attached some of my own high pressure fuel line to the barb and clamped it with a high quality German hose clamp. This line I ran across the top of the engine to the opposite side, and then down to the fuel line that runs down the center tunnel of the car.
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The fuel return line that extends all the way over to the other side of the engine drops down on the left side for connection to the fuel hose that runs down the center of the car (green arrow).
Figure 46
The fuel return line that extends all the way over to the other side of the engine drops down on the left side for connection to the fuel hose that runs down the center of the car (green arrow). Unfortunately, I was not able to find an adapter that would allow easy connection of the hose to the right angle fitting, so I had to fabricate the reducer shown here. Although this did work fine, there's probably a better solution out there (like a right-angle quick-connect that fits into the 8mm fuel hose), but I wasn't able to find it in time for this project. This photo shows me cutting the fuel line to length after the engine has been installed. The fuel line will connect to the top of the brass barb (purple arrow).
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The pressure line that supplies the Boxster connects to the fuel rails at the rear right side of the engine.
Figure 47
The pressure line that supplies the Boxster connects to the fuel rails at the rear right side of the engine. Since the 996 fuel rails have the pressure inlet located near the rear right side of the engine, I took a Dremmel took and cut the aluminum fuel line just rearward of the air filter housing (yellow arrow, inset photo). Then I attached a piece of high pressure fuel line along with two high quality fuel line hose clamps in order to assure there would be no leaks. I ran about one foot of hose from this point to the connection point shown in the next photo.
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The 996 fuel rail has a larger connection fitting for the fuel pressure line, so you need to find an adapter (upper right inset photo) to fit.
Figure 48
The 996 fuel rail has a larger connection fitting for the fuel pressure line, so you need to find an adapter (upper right inset photo) to fit. I took a piece of high pressure fuel line and attached it to where I cut the main aluminum Boxster line. On the other end I attached this fitting and then fastened it to the 996 fuel rails using a crowfoot wrench (inset lower right).
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The vacuum port for the brake booster is in the wrong spot on the 996 manifolds.
Figure 49
The vacuum port for the brake booster is in the wrong spot on the 996 manifolds. I swapped the port to the front right side of the engine (as installed into the Boxster), and also modified the piece from the Boxster motor to create a right-angle adapter that plugs into the stock vacuum port (inset photo).
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Here's the vacuum port installed on the right side of the engine (yellow arrow) with my modified adapter piece (green arrow).
Figure 50
Here's the vacuum port installed on the right side of the engine (yellow arrow) with my modified adapter piece (green arrow). The 16mm hose shown in Photo 51 plugs into the aluminum adapter on the end of this piece. Clearance is very tight, so be sure that you hook up your vacuum line before you install the engine all the way in the car. In this photo, the engine has about six to eight more inches to go before it's at its final height.
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I was a bit uncertain whether or not the 16mm heater hose that I found at the local auto parts store would suffice for the brake booster vacuum.
Figure 51
I was a bit uncertain whether or not the 16mm heater hose that I found at the local auto parts store would suffice for the brake booster vacuum. Sometimes hoses that are not designed for vacuum connections can collapse on themselves when there is a strong vacuum pulled. However, I did not find this to be the case with this hose, and it worked very well for this particular application. The inset photo shows me modifying the stock Boxster piece to create a right-angle adapter for the vacuum line.
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Installation time! Install the engine, but stop about a foot or so before the final height and hook up the A/C compressor and lines.
Figure 52
Installation time! Install the engine, but stop about a foot or so before the final height and hook up the A/C compressor and lines. The outboard attachment bolt is difficult to get to, and you will need a swivel socket and some extensions to reach it through the spaces in the intake manifold.
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The Carrera 996 intake manifold sits higher on the engine than the Boxster manifold, so you need to lower the entire drivetrain down slightly in order to make it all fit under the engine compartment lid.
Figure 53
The Carrera 996 intake manifold sits higher on the engine than the Boxster manifold, so you need to lower the entire drivetrain down slightly in order to make it all fit under the engine compartment lid. I used two ½ inch spacers and 100mm bolts placed between the mount and the chassis. These are standard steel spacers that you can find at any local hardware store. There shouldn't be any clearance problems lowering the drivetrain down, although you should be extra careful with steep driveways and speed bumps, particularly if you have lowered the car from its stock height (see Pelican Technical Article: Performance Suspension / Lowering / PSS10 Installation).
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For conversions, you need to use the Carrera 993 engine mounts (see <a style=color:000080 href=http://www.
Figure 54
For conversions, you need to use the Carrera 993 engine mounts (see Pelican Technical Article: Replacing Transmission Mounts) because they have longer studs exiting out of the bottom. The square boss on the bottom of the 993 transmission mounts fit into the transmission bracket. Therefore, simply adding a ½ inch spacer between the mount and the bracket will result in lowering the transmission down more than a ½ inch. Instead, I simply used some steel washers carefully placed between the mount and the bracket. Total amount lowered was about ½ inch when measured.
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Here's a shot of the engine almost fully installed into the Boxster engine bay.
Figure 55
Here's a shot of the engine almost fully installed into the Boxster engine bay. Although some people find it easier to install the engine and transmission together, I typically like to work with them separately: it gives you a lot more clearance, and you also don't have to remove the rear chassis support bar (purple arrow). Shown here is also a brand new dual-mass flywheel, which I recommend with a new engine installation.
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With the engine installed in the car, it's time to attach the oil filler tube.
Figure 56
With the engine installed in the car, it's time to attach the oil filler tube. I like to use the improved-style OEM German hose clamps to secure the tube to its base. Clearance can be tight, and these clamps help out considerably by giving you greater access.
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Securely attaching your ground strap is very important for the proper operation of the engine.
Figure 57
Securely attaching your ground strap is very important for the proper operation of the engine. The ground strap is attached to a bracket on the right side of the engine compartment, near the auxiliary air pump.
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The ground strap is attached to one of the lower mounting bolts for the starter (purple arrow, inset photo).
Figure 58
The ground strap is attached to one of the lower mounting bolts for the starter (purple arrow, inset photo). Loosen up this bolt by using a long extension accessed through the belt-side of the engine. Although I didn't have a difficult time attaching it with the engine installed in the car, it probably would be easier to bolt this to the starter before engine installation.
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With the engine installed, hook up the electrical connections in the small junction box.
Figure 59
With the engine installed, hook up the electrical connections in the small junction box. Be sure that your battery is disconnected before you do this! As mentioned previously, I had to flip the orientation of the junction box around to make some extra room for the resonance flapper valve. The 996 cables are longer than the Boxster cables and can accommodate this alternative positioning quite easily. If clearance is really tight, you might want to hook this up prior to lifting the engine all the way to its final height.
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Clearance is tight for the resonance flapper valve (hidden under the engine lid attachment speed nut: green arrow).
Figure 60
Clearance is tight for the resonance flapper valve (hidden under the engine lid attachment speed nut: green arrow). When you are raising the engine into place, continually monitor and adjust the position of the valve so that its proper operation isn't hindered by surrounding equipment. The fit is tight because the 996 manifold sits higher than the stock Boxster manifold.
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This photo shows the engine properly placed into the engine bay.
Figure 61
This photo shows the engine properly placed into the engine bay. At this point, you still need to install the auxiliary air pump, install the power steering reservoir, install the transmission, hook up the shifter cables, and install the air intake.
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These two photos show how I put together the air intake for the new engine.
Figure 62
These two photos show how I put together the air intake for the new engine. I used the flexible right-angle piece from the stock Boxster air intake: the inside diameter was very similar to the one used on the 996. Then, I used a PVC right-angle piece combined with a length of straight PVC pipe that I cut to the proper size. All three pieces were then joined together with rubber boots (green arrows), and large hose clamps. Finally, I cut another rubber boot to attach the right-angle piece to the throttle body (red arrow). All of these pieces were easily available at my local hardware store and the resulting air intake worked very effectively. It's not an ideal solution from a fluid dynamics perspective, but there's only a limited amount of options that you have working in the tight confines of the Boxster engine compartment.
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Here's a photo of me test-fitting the custom-made air intake in the engine compartment.
Figure 63
Here's a photo of me test-fitting the custom-made air intake in the engine compartment. The red arrow points to the outlet from the Evolution Motorsports air intake box. The green arrow points to the section of the stock Boxster air intake that I reused. Finally, the purple arrow points to the right-angle PVC piece (prior to me painting it black) that attaches to the throttle body. I test-fitted the air intake into the car in this manner, so that I could measure the length of straight-pipe PVC that needed to be cut to fit between the right-angle piece and the remainder of the stock Boxster air intake.
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Here's a photo of the completed air intake assembly, installed in the engine.
Figure 64
Here's a photo of the completed air intake assembly, installed in the engine. The yellow arrow points to the section of straight-pipe PVC that needed to be cut to length in order to join the right-angle piece and the remainder of the Boxster air intake. When completed, I tested the entire assembly for air leaks and found none (see Pelican Technical Article: Troubleshooting Vacuum Leaks).
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Here's another photo of the engine installed with the new air intake.
Figure 65
Here's another photo of the engine installed with the new air intake. Once you rotate down the throttle body, be sure that you remember to tighten up all of the rubber boots that connect the cross-over pieces to the intake manifold.
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Here's a photo of our new engine, fully installed.
Figure 66
Here's a photo of our new engine, fully installed. The shift cables have been attached, the front belt has been installed, the engine is full of coolant and oil, and we're ready to start it up. Don't forget that the cooling system needs to be bled (Pelican Technical Article: Coolant Replacement / Coolant Flush) prior to you driving away. I also recommend that you jumper the fuel pump relay (see Pelican Technical Article: Fuel Pump Replacement) and test your fuel line connections before you start the engine. You want to find any fuel line leaks while the engine is off and cold.
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As with any conversion project, there are going to be issues and problems.
Figure 67
As with any conversion project, there are going to be issues and problems. On this 3.4 engine, one of the oxygen sensors was not operating properly: we traced this back to a pinched wire harness. Also, the fuel mixture was way off, causing the engine to run like it had a banana stuffed in the tailpipe. The solution (given to me by Boxster conversion guru Todd Holyoak) was that the 996 computer program map was expecting the mass air-flow sensor to be mounted in a larger diameter tube. This meant that the computer thought a lot more air was going into the engine than it really was. Our solution was to install a variable 0-1000 ohm resistor (available at any electronics shop), and place it inline on pin 5 (white/blue) of the wire harness. This allowed us to use the PST-2 (or Durametric) tool to adjust the resistor value so that the fuel trim levels were properly set.  You can also use a stock 987 MAF housing and position it approximately where the 996 MAF sensor is located in the 996 chassis (close to the throttle body). This is more of an issue with the later cars, the 5.2.2 (1997-99) cars seem to deal better with the resistor trick, but the 2000 and later cars are less tolerant.
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Comments and Suggestions:
HandenatorComments: I have 2.5l -97 boxster with manual gearbox. Now my second option is swap -02 3.2s engineall included. Can I use -98 996 manifolds and/or trottlebody with S engine to keep my org.gas pedal and get bigger air intake? Or is it easyer to change gas pedal with wires? I can get alarm-and dme-box with S engine.
What I have to do with Fuel Return System ?
What kind of programming I have to do?

Thanks
April 10, 2014
 Followup from the Pelican Staff: I would try to utilize the long block from the donor car, swapping your manifolds and electronics over. This would be the path of least resistance. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
HandenatorComments: Hello and thanks for Your great advices. I΄m gonna swap 3.4l engine to my -97 boxster. How about gearbox. Can I use boxster gearbox and clutch with this engine? What would you recommend? Greetings from Finland!
April 2, 2014
 Followup from the Pelican Staff: What are you swapping it with? - Nick at Pelican Parts  
BIGJake111Comments: hello i own a 99 2.5, i am buying a 2000 2.7 roller for the sake of a lower mileage engine. My car is a tip, the roller is a manuel. Can i mat the 2.7 engine to my tip transmission? also is my throttle compatible with the 2000 if i understand the article right it is not but i want to be clear.
March 30, 2014
 Followup from the Pelican Staff: I do not think so. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
schumacher667Comments: Hello from Ireland, I have a 98 2.5 non egas,manual Boxster and also a complete 99 3.4 non egas manual motor.Any of the physical aspects of the motor change,I dont see as a problem, but when it comes to the DME,I was wondering if it would be possible to simply change the engine ECU,security ECU,keys,barrells etc.all out of the same 996 carinto the boxster?are the harness's compatable?I will be installing a 3.5" air duct.where i am i dont have access to a PST-2 or similar.so i would like the least amount of problems as possible.looking forward to your opinions
Regards Mick Wade
February 20, 2014
 Followup from the Pelican Staff: The more you swap over from the donor car the better. I cant be sure about the harnesses, etc. It will be an experiment on your part to see what works. You can start by comparing part numbers to see what matches and what doesn't. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
johnComments: Can I replace a 2000 porsche boxter soft top plastic window with a 2010 porsche boxter s soft top. with glass window !
February 14, 2014
 Followup from the Pelican Staff: No, i do not think that will work. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
RichDComments: Ok I have a 1998 with a dead 2.5 Liter.
I have a full 2000 2.7 Liter with gear box and DME.
Dropped the old one out -
I realize I need to use the mechanical throttle cable Throttle Body - and I see and understand the mechanical challenge of the crossover tube size difference...

two questions - if I do use the 2.5 Throttle body on the 2.7 how do I wire the connectors? the 2.7 has one 6 pin connector the 2.5 has two 3 pin connectors... Maybe this can't work I'm not sure

2 I've also heard get a 996 3.4 Throttle Body - does that solve both the size and connector issues? Can anyone give me a good part number for that?

I'd rather use the 2.5 Throttle Body and get the project done - right now I'm not installing the 2.7 until I get this sorted out - easier to solve when not in the car...

All advice GREATLY appreciated!

November 20, 2013
 Followup from the Pelican Staff: I would stick to using the throttle for the engine. Otherwise you will be trouble shooting compatibility issues. With the 6 wire, it has motor control wires and 4 TPS wires. I think you will want to get a harness for the 2.7 if you don't have it.

Give our parts specialists a call at 1-888-280-7799. They can help you with the part numbers. - Nick at Pelican Parts
 
RonnieBComments: I have a 2002 boxster base 2.7 with a bad engine. Because I am new to the Porsche world, i'm not sure I have the knowledge to perform a engine swap on my own. Does anyone have a good recommendation that I could contact? I would like to upgrade to a bigger motor if it doesn't break the bank.
October 15, 2013
 Followup from the Pelican Staff: Some of the best rebuilds come from the Porsche factory or from Flat 6 innovations http://www.flat6innovations.com /. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
PatrickComments: I Have installed a 2.7l engine from a 2008 boxster into a 2006 boxster and have installed wires for variocam plus actuators.If i keep the 2006 DME software engine does not have much power and transmission doesn,t shift right.I installed 2008 boxster DME software and it runs great but i have codes for low coolant level,alternator communication and no transmission can signal.dtc codes are p1699,p1530,p1628. I thought about changing can wire pins at DME and other control units to match 2008 model but I can't find accurate diagrams.I appreciate any help I can have.
October 7, 2013
 Followup from the Pelican Staff: Going to the newer engine, you will have to install the control modules from other components also. This is where it gets tough, you have to figure out what the DME wants to see. Do you have the harness from the donor vehicle? I wouldn't swap pins around, I would try to get the correct wiring harness. Too much room for error.- Nick at Pelican Parts  
Jacopo986Comments: Hi to everyone.
My 2.7 Boxster 986 MY2000 had a serious engine failure, so I'm thinking about installing an used engine.
I've found a very cheap 2.7 Cayman 2008 engine, which I read it's difficult to install because of DME differences and so on.
Can someone tell me as much detailed as possible which modifications I should do? I need for sure a Motronic 7.8, and then?
Many thanks for your patience and sorry for my not-so-good english.
Kind regards,
Jacopo from Italy
August 26, 2013
 Followup from the Pelican Staff: This is a but much to answer here in this comment thread. When swapping engines, it is trial by fire. At times, the best bet is to start with the obvious and replace what else is needed to get things right.
I opened a post in our forums. A Pelican community member may be able to answer your question.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
rj0002Comments: Bugatti kit car, I will be switching out my engine in my donor car Fiero due to the location of the engine compartment to a Porshe Boxster engine. Is it feasible to switch out the engine to a different engine since the Boxster only has 217HP? Would like to use the same Boxster transmission and tranaxle.
July 29, 2013
 Followup from the Pelican Staff: You're going to have to do some research, to see what part numbers are compatible. It's possible to can bolt the drivetrain to a later more powerful engine. You should be Ok with a similar year, as long as the bell housing bolt pattern and the clutch components mesh well. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
BobComments: I am installing an early 1999 3.4 into my 98 Boxster.
I assume that I use the 996 MAF and the 996 Clutch and pressure plate?? Do I also use the 996 cat sensors?
Lastly, I have heard of flashing the DME for only two cat
sensors instead of four. If emissions are not an issue will
this effect my engines longevity? Thanks, For your help !!
July 29, 2013
 Followup from the Pelican Staff: I would use most of the parts associated witht he early engine, this will leave less bugs to work out later.

if you can flash for two O2 sensors and emissions are not a concern due to local regulations, the engine should run fine. However, the life of your catalysts will be reduced. - Nick at Pelican Parts
 
TommyComments: I have a 99 boxster and going to do a 2000 3.4 swap. Anything else I might need to know before I do the swap.
May 11, 2013
 Followup from the Pelican Staff: Nope, it's all in the article. - Wayne at Pelican Parts  
KroggersComments: I have a 2001 Boxster S racing car and looking to install a data logger that collects information via the CAN Bus. I understand that my car has the wires for the CAN bus, but not the required DME. My question is if some CAN signals are already on the wires in my car from the 7.2 DME, or are they dead? I want to collect RPM and some other channels.
April 22, 2013
 Followup from the Pelican Staff: If you're DME does not cumminucate via CAN the signals you want to log, tapping into a CAN signal will not help. The signal must be present in the first place. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
SamComments: I have a 2002 3.2 s. this engine failed

I found a 3.2 2001 s engine. I will be getting the ECU/alarm module with the engine.

Is the fuel delivery system different on these?
April 14, 2013
 Followup from the Pelican Staff: Both engines should be DME 7.2. In 2003 the Boxster engine received a new engine management system. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
pfbmabComments: I am putting a 2001 Boxster 3.2S motor in a 98 Boxster. I have a complete donor car. I can swap the DME, keys, and immoboliser. What would it take to use the drive by wire throttle? If that's too much trouble, is there a 3.2 cable throttle body or do you recommend the '99 3.4 version?

BTW, this conversion seems a good bit easier than some you are discussing. For example, I was able to remove the engine complete with the trans and the exhaustincluding suspension brace by removing the suspension from one side. To do this I disconnected everything but the engine and transmission mounts. I placed a cart under the car and lowered the car until the engine and trans were in contact with the cart. Then I removed the bolts from the engine mount and one trans mount, and the suspension from the other side. Then, just jack the car up from the stock jack points with two jacks until it is clear of the whole engine assembly, which simply rolls out already on the cart.
I pulled the motor from my 98 using your method, remove trans, jack car up, lower engine. A little scary on the way down. I found the other method much more manageable.
Thank you for your invaluable information.
March 23, 2013
 Followup from the Pelican Staff: If you have the complete car, you can make it work. You will have to swap everything. Including the body harness, accelerator pedal and control modules. For the sake of simplicity, you might want to swap just the long block.- Nick at Pelican Parts  
willwhoComments: what years would I have to look for for the swap also I appologize about all of the post.
March 7, 2013
 Followup from the Pelican Staff: Use the information in the srticle to determine compatible engines. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
willwhoComments: what kind of horsepower difference am I looking at as well as response time ?
March 7, 2013
 Followup from the Pelican Staff: See my other reply on your post with numbered questions. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
willwhoComments: also the 3.6 will be from a 996 I want to do this myself for minimal cost labor wise but dumping the money into the improvements.

will my ecu need to be reprogrammed?

BTW I love this site it is very knowledgeable
March 7, 2013
 Followup from the Pelican Staff: See my other reply on your post with numbered questions. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
willwhoComments: I have a 2001 porsche boxster 986 convertible 2.7 liter and I would like to swap to a 3.6L motor I have quite a few questions

1. being can I use my old clutch and flywheel.

2. can I use my old transmission.

3. can I use my old wiring harness and ECU.

4. what modifications would I need to make to the air intake to make it fit. I heard that was a issue

5. what additional parts would I need to make the swap and is it similar to the 3.4 install above ?

6. what can I do about the exhaust as I heard that can be a issue also.

7. will it bolt up to my original motor mounts?

8. can I purchase these parts from you guys and maybe the motor also ?

9. what upgrades can I do before the install to increase the horsepower and do you guys sell these parts?

10 do I need suspension upgrades do you guys sell these parts.

*please link all parts needed for the Job*

Thank You very much for your time and please be as specific as possible as I was thinking of doing my body but am now considering dumping the money into this area *as speed is my life*.
March 7, 2013
 Followup from the Pelican Staff: Most of your questions can be answered on the forum. Our members that have performed the swap can be a great help.

The transmission parts art not compatible.

Wiring harness and other parts will have to be replaced.

You will need to swap most parts from the S engine over to your vehicle

You call call our parts specialist for the parts list you require: 1-888-280-7799- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
PotenzaComments: Hello, I have a 2004 Boxters 3.2S manual done 24000 and seems to have failed from this IMS bearing. They are pulling it apart next week but reading this it doesnt look encouraging. Is it possible to put a 3.8 engine into this car and what cost am I looking at to get one to NZ please
March 1, 2013
 Followup from the Pelican Staff: It's hard to estimate cost due to the constant variation in used part prices. I would cotnact an engine retailer and get a quote. The best bet may be to repair your engine, there are a few good rebuilders out there who can get you rolling again. I would guess that rebuilding would be cheaper, even with the shipping. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
jsceashComments: Is it possible to install a DFI motor into a 03 Boxster If so what other changes are needed.
December 29, 2012
 Followup from the Pelican Staff: I have not heard of anyone who has done this engine swap so far. A better route to go would be to install a three-point leader early engine into the boxer rather than one of these later style engines. The horsepower is roughly the same and the amount of effort to install the engine is a lot less. If you do decide to go this route please keep us posted and let us know how it turns out. - Wayne at Pelican Parts  
dabecaComments: help i am dropping a 3.2s engine into a racing car at the moment but while hooking up the new programmable ecu i cannot find the cam position sensor on the cylinders 4 - 6. where it would be is just blank? even the original Porsche wiring loom does not have the plug but a later loom i have has the second sensor plug attached! confused?
December 25, 2012
 Followup from the Pelican Staff: The camshaft position sensors are located in the cylinder heads. The left side is at the front of the engine, the right side is the rear of the engine. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
gus969Comments: I have a 1997 boxster with a 1999 911 engine Kelly Moss conversion car.

I have the following two codes:

PO453-tank pressure sender

PO 447-shut off valve activated

The car does not have a pressure sensor on tank or a purge valve on canister.

I understand in 1997 the cars did not come with these.

Is there anyway to get these codes cleared?
December 14, 2012
 Followup from the Pelican Staff: I believe the only way would be to have the software in the DME modified. Porsche may be able to handle this, as I know BMW does it for their vehicles. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
pilotpComments: I have a 2004 986 S low mileage with an IMSB failure. Engine type M96/24, Engine number 67404628, DME serial number 0093572.Invoice date was April 2004.
One of my options now is for an engine swap. From what I've read it seems like the easiest swap would be a 3.2L 2003-2004 986 with 7.8DME or early model 2005 987 3.4L.
What other swaps can I do progressing with degree of difficulty, example 2007 3.4L 987?
If I change to a 2007 987 3.4L where on the instrument panel will the oil level be shown, same place it presently is on the RPM gauge?
How do I know if I have traction control?
November 30, 2012
 Followup from the Pelican Staff: the 3.2 might be your bext bet for the swap. I would keep it as simple as possible, as any engine swap can require trouble shooting during the process.

The oil level display should not change, as it is built into the cluster. - Nick at Pelican Parts
 
JulianComments: How much would cost to repair a Ims destroyed 2000 2.7 boxster engine? Do you do it?
Julian 9547099144
August 31, 2012
 Followup from the Pelican Staff: I opened a post in our forums. A Pelican community member may be able to answer your question.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
stephersComments: I have a 2003 2.7 Boxster that has blown out the IMS bearing and the only altertanive engine is a 2.7 2000 engine. I have completed the update, put a new clutch in and installed everything into the car but I am getting one trouble code that I cannot get rid of. P0349 is the code " cam position sensor 2-open circuit " I have checked all the wiring and actual rotor, all is OK.. What can I do to fix this. A newer engine right now is just not an option where I am.

Thanks, Rick
July 24, 2012
 Followup from the Pelican Staff: Have you confirmed the signal it present at the DME? Since this a circuit code it is pretty cut and dry. Tee DME expects to see a certain amount of voltage at the Camshaft sensor wiring and does not. I would suggest: working at the DME, KOEO (key on egine OFF) backprobe camshaft sensor 1 and see what you have for voltage on all 3 wires. Should be something like, 5 volts, 0.1 volts and 5 or 0.1 on the other (depending on shutter position). Then compare those values with the sensor that is giving you the problem. Use this test to track down what wire(s) is open or shorted. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
whirlwindComments: Dear Wayne; I would like to install a 996 engine in my Boxster base,I have your book and use it on a regular basis. Can I use any 99-00-01 996 engine? Can I use an engine and ECU from a triptronic? Can they be re-programed to a manual? Can an E throttle body be replaced or converted to cable? Im
tolled I need a matching DME and immobilizer as well as a 996 key switch and key. Pleas tell me exactly what I will need. Thanks Doug



July 3, 2012
 Followup from the Pelican Staff: Yes, it should not matter whether or not you use a manual or Tiptronic ECU for the conversion. See the article above for the info on the 99-00-01 engines. If you have a throttle-based engine, then yes, you can use the throttle body from the 1999 engine and install it on an 2000, or 2001 engine. You don't really want to install a cable-throttle body into a later car (I've never heard of that being done). - Wayne at Pelican Parts  
ad931Comments: I am fitting a 2003 986S engine into a 2001 986 2.7, both with manual gearboxes. Can you please clarify your comment that the DME connector printouts have to be slightly modified. Whichnpinsmhave to be modified & why, and also which sensors do these pin outs relate to. I can see that there is a difference between the 7.2 & 7.8 DME's with regard to DME connectors 1 & 4. I already have a Motronic 7.8 DME, keys/immobiliser and engine wiring harness. . I also have access to the crash damaged 2003 986S that has donated its engine, so I can remove any additional parts that may be required.

I appreciate your assistance and look forward to your response. Thanks Arthur.
June 6, 2012
 Followup from the Pelican Staff: Hi there. This is a somewhat complicated procedure - the pinouts on the DME are different and the location of the camshaft position sensors are not in the same location, so you need to lengthen the harness in some places to accommodate. I will copy this question to our forums, where it can be discussed in further there ( http://forums.pelicanparts.com/boxster-cayman-forum/ ) - Wayne at Pelican Parts  
agd931Comments: I am fitting a 2003 986S engine into a 2001 986 2.7, both with manual gearboxes. Can you please clarify your comment that the DME connector printouts have to be slightly modified. Whichnpinsmhave to be modified & why, and also which sensors do these pin outs relate to. I can see that there is a difference between the 7.2 & 7.8 DME's with regard to DME connectors 1 & 4. I already have a Motronic 7.8 DME, keys/immobiliser and engine wiring harness. . I also have access to the crash damaged 2003 986S that has donated its engine, so I can remove any additional parts that may be required.

I appreciate your assistance and look forward to your response. Thanks Arthur.
June 6, 2012
 Followup from the Pelican Staff: How much would cost to repair a Ims destroyed 2000 2.7 boxster engine? - Nick at Pelican Parts  
sgl944tComments: I have a 1999 Boxster with an IMS failure. If I put a 2.7 or 3.2 in, do I need to reprogram the DME and any other issues?
May 19, 2012
 Followup from the Pelican Staff: The answers to your questions are contained in the Engine Swap article right here... - Wayne at Pelican Parts  
sarabComments: 2000 porche boxter 2.7 engine for sale 3k. e mail sarab90212@yahoo.com
May 10, 2012
 Followup from the Pelican Staff: I would post this in our forums: http://forums.pelicanparts.com - Wayne at Pelican Parts  
Bosxterjfh99Comments: My boxster suffered the classic "D" chunk failure, and now I am looking to upgrade to a 2000/2001 S engine. The plan is to purchase a wrecked car and swap all the neccessary components into my car. Are there hidden any hidden surprises I should be aware during this swap?
April 18, 2012
 Followup from the Pelican Staff: I am fitting a 2003 986S engine into a 2001 986 2.7, both with manual gearboxes. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
ButzieComments: What do I hook up the wires for the variable valve timing. Which is the c connector on the DME? Which wires do I hook up to ground and which the controllers? I'm doing a 3.6 in a2003 boxster s
January 29, 2012
 Followup from the Pelican Staff: You are going to have to get a wiring diagram for the 2003 Boxter engine management system and one for the 3.6liter engine in whatever car it came out of and match each wire to each sensor and solenoid in the engine management system - Nick at Pelican Parts  
BobComments: I am installing a 1999 drop out engine from a manual trans car into a auto trans car. Can you tell me what parts need to be used from the original engine? I know the wiring harness and flywheel need to be exchanged.
December 16, 2011
 Followup from the Pelican Staff: I haven't done this particular swap before (automatic / manual engine swap), but I do not think there are many differences between the two, other than the obvious torque converter / transmission attachment issues. As you mentioned, I would probably keep the existing wire harness that is on the current engine. But other than that, I don't think there's anything else that you need to be concerned with. I will copy this question to the forums, and perhaps someone there will have additional input. - Wayne at Pelican Parts  
ByronComments: I have a 2003 Boxster base model with an IMS failure. Would like to know if I can swap engine out for a base 2.7L from a 2000 Boxster. What issues can I expect chassis, transmission, computer,etc...?
August 15, 2011
 Followup from the Pelican Staff: With enough time and money, you can do just about anything. However, the 2000 engine has a different chain design and different camshaft adjusters that make this transition difficult. I would look for a 2003 and later engine to transplant instead. - Wayne at Pelican Parts  
maxComments: after swapping engine, the clutch is not up, do i have to refill hadrualic fluid and where?
May 30, 2011
 Followup from the Pelican Staff: Possibly. The brakes and clutch use the same fluid, so if your brake fluid reservoir is full, then that is not the problem. You might need to bleed the whole clutch hydraulic system, full instructions here: http://www.pelicanparts.com/techarticles/Boxster_Tech/45-TRANS-Clutch_Hydraulics/45-TRANS-Clutch_Hydraulics.htm - Wayne at Pelican Parts  
Wayne at Pelican PartsComments: I just realized that my captions are missing from the tech article:

A- Fuel rail
B- Intake rubber sleeve with vacuum port installed on the right side of throttle body
C- Fuel pressure regulator on fuel rail
D- Air injection pump valve
E- Electronic vacuum solenoid valve for air injection pump valve
F- Vacuum reservoir
G- Four-way vacuum tee
H- Vacuum check valve black side points toward the manifold
I- Three-way vacuum tee one side is plugged
J- Electronic vacuum solenoid valve for resonance flap valve
K- Resonance flap valve
L- Intake rubber sleeve with vacuum port installed on left side of throttle body
March 20, 2011
 Followup from the Pelican Staff: Okay - Nick at Pelican Parts  
yamatodogComments: to swap a 2002 3.6l motor into my 2001 box. is a NEW 7.8dme reqd. or can I use the one that came from the 3.6l doner car?
March 16, 2011
 Followup from the Pelican Staff: You don't need a brand new 7.8 DME, but if you use someone elses, then you need to make sure that you get the immobilizer, and the keys from the donor car. This is because the DME and the immobilizer are keyed together. You can always get replacement keys to be cut and reprogrammed to work with the ECU, but most of the time it's just easier to get the electronic key portion from the donor car. If you don't get the immobilizer from the donor car, then you will have to purchase a brand new one and program the DME to work with that one. - Wayne at Pelican Parts  
HenryComments: Is this engine conversion street legal in California? Any issues with passing smog tests?
March 3, 2011
 Followup from the Pelican Staff: Technically, I believe it's illegal to swap *anything* on your engine in the state of California. However, this particular engine has catalytic converters and it basically a stock 3.4L engine from a 996, so it's pollution profile is similar, if not identical to a stock Boxster or 996. There were no issues passing the smog tests for this car whatsoever, once we got the issue with the MAF resolved. - Wayne at Pelican Parts  
MarkComments: Can you tell me anything about installing 2004 GT3 engine in a a 2003 Boxster S? I know the GT3 engine is not the same as the 996/997 engine. I raced a Porsche for 10 years but quit in the late 80's and have not kept up with things. I don't know what parts, engines, etc. can be interchanged like I did with the air cooled engines. If you know anything about this and could help me could I call you? If so give me a # and a good time to call.

Mark
February 21, 2011
 Followup from the Pelican Staff: I've heard of someone who has done this, but I haven't seen the car, or heard the exact details. I did hear it cost them about $60K to do it, which is more than a used GT3 these days. The GT3 engine is a dry-sump engine, which means that you would need to find a spot for the external oil tank and then plumb the oil lines to it. The stacks are much higher - they would have to be redesigned or modified too. I'll copy this message to our forums, perhaps someone there has some additional input.

As for what engines fit what chassis, the information that I have is contained in this article here. - Wayne at Pelican Parts
 
DerfoComments: Hi There
I am very keen to get myself a Porsche Boxster in the very near future.Your website is excellent for my research on the model, especially the engine. I am very much hands on so would be looking for a chassis I can upgrade with a bigger motor. Could you tell me, do the 3.4 & 3.6/8 engines have the same issues with the IMS.

Kind regards
Fred www.sjsvwcamperinteriors.co.uk
January 22, 2011
 Followup from the Pelican Staff: Yes, unfortunately, the IMS issue seems to be affecting the whole lineup of Porsche engines. The early ones can now be upgraded with a replacement bearing - see my article here: http://www.pelicanparts.com/techarticles/Boxster_Tech/14-ENGINE-Intermediate_Shaft_Bearing/14-ENGINE-Intermediate_Shaft_Bearing.htm On the later engines like the 3.8, Porsche used a larger bearing that is not removable from the engine. - Wayne at Pelican Parts  
autodoctor911Comments: I earlier suggested using a filter with regulator from a bmw or mercedes. please do not use the bmw filter as it is set for 3.5 bar, where as the mercedes is set for the correct for porsche motors 3.8bar of pressure. as I said before though, simply put the filter in line with the pressure outlet to the returnless fuel rail and run the return line to the filter.
September 22, 2010
 Followup from the Pelican Staff: Not a terribly bad idea there. - Wayne at Pelican Parts 
autodoctor911Comments: I have one suggestion for converting a returnless engine to fit in a chassis with a return type chassis. use the returnless fuel rail from the engine and install a fuel filter with built in fuel pressure regulator as found in a BMW or mercedes. the BMW filter is kind of lengthy, so the more compact mercedes units may find a better home, but I am mounting a filter I had from a 2002 325i under the car just ahead of the engine. the return line then connects to the filter.
September 22, 2010
 Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thanks for the idea - Nick at Pelican Parts  

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 Applies to: 1997 Boxster, 1998 Boxster, 1999 Boxster, 2000 Boxster, 2001 Boxster, 2002 Boxster, 2003 Boxster, 2004 Boxster, 2005 Boxster, 2006 Boxster, 2007 Boxster, 2008 Boxster, 1999 Carrera, 1999 996, 2000 Carrera, 2000 996, 2001 Carrera, 2001 996, 2002 Carrera, 2002 996, 2003 Carrera, 2003 996, 2004 Carrera, 2004 996, 2005 Carrera, 2005 997, 2006 Carrera, 2006 997, 2007 Carrera, 2007 996, 2008 Carrera, 2008 997
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