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S54 Oil Filter Housing Gasket Replacement
 
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Pelican Technical Article:

S54 Oil Filter Housing Gasket Replacement

Nick Czerula

Time:

3 hours3 hrs

Tab:

$65

Talent:

*****

Tools:

Set of sockets, wrenches, screwdrivers, floor jack, jack stands, wheel chocks, safety glasses

Applicable Models:

BMW E46 M3 Coupe/Conv (2006)
BMW Z4 Coupe/Conv (2006)

Parts Required:

Oil filter, engine oil, oil filter housing gasket, pressure relief valve O-rings

Hot Tip:

Work with a cool engine.

Performance Gain:

Cleaner engine and correct oil pressure

Complementary Modification:

Change engine oil

BMW engine often utilize an oil filter housing (stand) mounted to the left front of the engine. This housing holds the oil filter and allows routing points for oil coolers, oil cooler lines or accessory oil lines, such as VANOS lines. The housing is also part of the mounting system for the alternator, and most times the power steering pump. The housing is sealed to the engine using a molded rubber (profile) gasket.

If you find an oil leak down the left side of your engine or what looks to be the oil pan, it may be the oil filter housing gasket. The oil filter housing uses a rubber profile gasket, and over time it hardens and leaks. When trying to locate the source of an oil leak, always start at the top of the engine. Locate any oil-covered areas. The cleanest oil covered area is likely the source of leak. You will need the oil filter housing profile gasket and for 6-cylinder models the VANOS oil line sealing washers. It's not a bad idea to grab oil and a filter too. Changing the oil is only a few more steps when doing this repair.

To avoid marring the paint and trim, work with a plastic prying tool or wrap a screwdriver tip with masking tape before prying out body or interior items.

Keep in mind that when your car was serviced before, parts may have been replaced with different size fasteners used in the replacement. The sizes of the nuts and bolts we give may be different from what you have, so be prepared with different size sockets and wrenches.

Protect your eyes, hands and body from fluids, dust and debris while working on your vehicle. If you're working with the electrical system, disconnect the battery before beginning. Always catch fluids in appropriate containers and properly dispose of any fluid waste. Recycle parts, packaging and fluids when possible. Do not work on your vehicle if you feel the task is beyond your ability.

Vehicle models change and evolve, as they grow older, so the vehicle shown in our illustrations may vary slightly from yours. If something seems different, let us know and share your info to help other users. Do you have questions or want to add to the article? Leave a comment below. When leaving a comment, please leave your vehicle information.

Jack up the front of your vehicle. See our Tech Article on: Jacking Up Your Vehicle.

BMW engines often utilize an oil filter housing (stand) mounted to the left front of the engine (green arrow).
Figure 1

BMW engines often utilize an oil filter housing (stand) mounted to the left front of the engine (green arrow). This housing holds the oil filter and allows routing points for oil coolers, oil cooler lines or accessory oil lines, such as VANOS lines. The housing is also part of the mounting system for the alternator and most times the power steering pump. The housing is sealed to the engine using a molded rubber (profile) gasket. If you find an oil leak down the left side of your engine or what looks to be the oil pan, it may be the oil filter housing gasket. The oil filter housing uses a rubber profile gasket, and over time it hardens and leaks. When trying to locate the source of an oil leak, always start at the top of the engine. Locate any oil-covered areas. The cleanest oil covered area is likely the source of the leak. You will need the oil filter housing profile gasket, and for 6-cylinder models the VANOS oil line sealing washers. It's not a bad idea to grab oil and a filter too. Changing the oil is only a few more steps when doing this repair.

Loosen the oil filter-housing lid until you can see the sealing O-ring or filter.
Figure 2

Loosen the oil filter-housing lid until you can see the sealing O-ring or filter. This allows oil in the filter housing and filter to drain into the engine oil pan. Place a drain pan (green arrow) under the left side of your vehicle (red arrow).

Working below the engine, loosen the three 13mm power steering pulley bolts (red arrows).
Figure 3

Working below the engine, loosen the three 13mm power steering pulley bolts (red arrows). Just loosen them. Do not remove yet. Remove the engine drive belt from the alternator and the power steering pulley and lay it aside. See our tech article on engine drive belt replacing. Remove the alternator. See our tech article on alternator replacing.

Now, you can remove the pulley (red arrow) from the power steering pump (green arrow).
Figure 4

Now, you can remove the pulley (red arrow) from the power steering pump (green arrow). If the pulley is stuck, work it side to side. Do not use excessive force. If the pulley cracks or chips, replace it. It is made of plastic and can becomes brittle over time.

Working at the back of the power steering pump, remove the 10mm oil line support fastener (red arrows).
Figure 5

Working at the back of the power steering pump, remove the 10mm oil line support fastener (red arrows). Then remove the 13mm power steering pump bracket fastener (green arrow).

Next, remove the two 13mm power steering mounting fasteners (green arrows).
Figure 6

Next, remove the two 13mm power steering mounting fasteners (green arrows). Once the fasteners are removed, lift the power steering pump up and off the engine. Place it aside and out of the way.

Working behind the oil filter housing (green arrow), detach the wiring harness mount (red arrow).
Figure 7

Working behind the oil filter housing (green arrow), detach the wiring harness mount (red arrow).

Using a trim panel tool, lever the wiring harness clip (red arrow) out of the bracket (inset).
Figure 8

Using a trim panel tool, lever the wiring harness clip (red arrow) out of the bracket (inset).

Using a 6mm Allen, remove the oil cooler line fastener (red arrow).
Figure 9

Using a 6mm Allen, remove the oil cooler line fastener (red arrow).

Pull the oil cooler lines (green arrows) straight out of the housing (red arrow).
Figure 10

Pull the oil cooler lines (green arrows) straight out of the housing (red arrow).

Be sure to remove the old sealing O-rings out of the housing (red arrows).
Figure 11

Be sure to remove the old sealing O-rings out of the housing (red arrows).

Working at the oil filter housing, remove the four 13mm bolts (red arrows).
Figure 12

Working at the oil filter housing, remove the four 13mm bolts (red arrows). Mark the bolt locations before removing. They are different lengths. This will help you get them back in the right place later.

This photo shows the bolt lengths and locations.
Figure 13

This photo shows the bolt lengths and locations. The red arrow points to the bottom bolt closest to the firewall, and the green arrow points to the top bolt closest to the radiator. Mark the bolt locations before removing. They are different lengths, and this will help you get them back in the right place later.

Pull the oil filter housing away from the engine and remove it (red arrow) just enough to access the electrical connector for the oil pressure sensor.
Figure 14

Pull the oil filter housing away from the engine and remove it (red arrow) just enough to access the electrical connector for the oil pressure sensor.

Disconnect the oil sensor electrical connectors by squeezing the wire release tab and pulling it off the sensor (red arrow).
Figure 15

Disconnect the oil sensor electrical connectors by squeezing the wire release tab and pulling it off the sensor (red arrow).

Clean the engine-sealing surface (green arrow).
Figure 16

Clean the engine-sealing surface (green arrow). Inspect the alignment dowels (red arrows). They help you align the housing when reinstalling. Be sure they are in good condition and installed in the engine straight.

Place it on a workbench.
Figure 17

Place it on a workbench. Then use a small pick to remove the gasket. Install the new gasket into the oil filter housing. Reconnect the oil switch electrical connector. Then install the oil filter housing onto the engine. Be sure to align the dowels properly. Tighten the oil filter housing fasteners in a crisscross pattern. Install the power steering pump to oil filter housing and tighten the fasteners. Then reassemble the engine in the reverse order of the procedure. Remember to top up the engine oil and check for oil leaks when complete.

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Page last updated: Fri 12/9/2016 02:57:19 AM