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Radiator Hose Replacement
 
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Pelican Technical Article:

Radiator Hose Replacement

Steve Vernon

Time:

2 hours2 hrs

Tab:

$2 to $100

Talent:

**

Tools:

Philips head screwdriver, large bucket

Applicable Models:

BMW E10 2002 Coupe/Conv (1967-76)
BMW E21 320i Coupe (1977-83)

Parts Required:

New hoses

Hot Tip:

Get a really big catch tray

Performance Gain:

Proper cooling

Complementary Modification:

Radiator flush

The cooling system on your vehicle is one of the most important and yet neglected parts of the car. Nothing can leave you stranded faster than not replacing a rubber hose before it goes bad. I recommend inspecting your hoses and couplings every two years or so. As they age, they have a tendency to get hard and brittle. When you gently squeeze a hose, it should be relatively soft and easy to indent with your hand. It shouldn't feel like it is brittle or crunching when you squeeze it. It should spring back to its original shape pretty quickly after being compressed. If it feels very hard, then it might be time to replace it. If there is a bulge in the hose, or any type of crack in the surface of the hose, then you should replace it as well. Also check for leaks around where the hoses create their connections--that is a sign that the hose should be replaced.

We are working on the Clarion Build's BMW 2002, so everything on or project car is like new including the hardware. You are probably not going to be as lucky. While all of our hose clamps were new and just needed a Philips head screwdriver to remove them, you should check the condition of your hardware for the right tools. This is also a good time to replace worn, corroded or tired clamps.

A couple of safety precautions/instructions you may want to observe before beginning:

Allow the cooling system to cool down to a coolant temperature of less than 90°C. Open the cap of the cooling system slowly; turn a conventional coolant cap as far as the first detent and turn a screwed coolant cap approximately 1/2 turn and release the pressure. Wear protective gloves, protective clothing and eye protection. NEVER pour coolant into beverage bottles, cups, etc.. Someone might accidentally pick that cup up and start to drink.

If the coolant in the car is new there is no reason to replace it as long as you drain it into a clean container. Coolant is expensive and not too great for the environment, so if the coolant in your car is good, try and save it to reuse it.

You will need to drain the system to below the hoses you are replacing and then refill and bleed the cooling system. Please see our articles on coolant flush and fill for additional assistance.

The cooling system is very basic on the 2002.
Figure 1

The cooling system is very basic on the 2002. All the hoses are relatively easy to access. The system consists of a hose from the head to radiator (red arrow), head to thermostat housing (yellow arrow), and lower thermostat to lower radiator (green arrow) along with a hose from the water pump to thermostat housing (blue arrow). There is an additional hose from the water pump to heater core shown later in this article.

All of the Clarion Build's BMW 2002 hoses were in like new condition and held in place by new hardware.
Figure 2

All of the Clarion Build's BMW 2002 hoses were in like new condition and held in place by new hardware. Removing the hose from the head to the top of the radiator involved using a Philips head screwdriver and removing both clamps and sliding the hose off (red arrow).

The hose from the head to top of the thermostat was the same procedure (red arrow).
Figure 3

The hose from the head to top of the thermostat was the same procedure (red arrow).

You can access the lower thermostat to lower radiator hose (red arrow) along with the water pump to thermostat (yellow arrow) from above.
Figure 4

You can access the lower thermostat to lower radiator hose (red arrow) along with the water pump to thermostat (yellow arrow) from above. This picture simply gives a better image of how they are run and connected. Use the right tool and simply remove them.

With the hoses and thermostat out of the car you can see how everything goes together: head to thermostat (yellow arrow), thermostat (blue arrow), thermostat to water pump (red arrow) and the thermostat to lower radiator hose (green arrow).
Figure 5

With the hoses and thermostat out of the car you can see how everything goes together: head to thermostat (yellow arrow), thermostat (blue arrow), thermostat to water pump (red arrow) and the thermostat to lower radiator hose (green arrow).

There is a hose from the water pump to heater core (red arrow).
Figure 6

There is a hose from the water pump to heater core (red arrow). If this hose needs to be replaced you will need to move the alternator out of the way. Please see our article on alternator replacement for additional assistance. Installation of all of the hoses is the reverse order of removal. Do not forget to fill and bleed the coolant. Please see our article on coolant flush and fill for further instruction on filling and bleeding the system.


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Page last updated: Fri 12/9/2016 02:57:36 AM