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M62 8 Cylinder Intake Manifold Replacement
 
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Pelican Technical Article:

M62 8 Cylinder Intake Manifold Replacement

Nick Czerula

Time:

4 hours4 hrs

Tab:

$350

Talent:

*****

Tools:

Flathead screwdriver, T30, T45 Torx, 11mm socket (socket set), Allen bits, torque wrench

Applicable Models:

BMW X5 (2000-06)

Parts Required:

Intake manifold gasket set

Hot Tip:

Work with a cool engine

Performance Gain:

Seal vacuum leaks, repair faulty gaskets

Complementary Modification:

Replace valley pan and coolant pipe

The BMW 8-cylinder engine in E53 X5 models (M62 engine) is equipped with a plastic intake manifold. The intake manifold houses the crankcase breather. The oil separator is mounted to the right rear on a bracket. The manifold direct injection fuel injectors are to each cylinder via an individual fuel runner. This provides good power and throttle response.

The 8-cylinder engine utilizes rubber profile gaskets for the intake manifold. Over time the gaskets fail and leaks develop. If you have a hard-to-find vacuum leak, replace your intake manifold gaskets. If you find oil inside your intake manifold, replace the crankcase breather valve. Clean the inside of the intake manifold thoroughly and be careful not to get any debris inside the cylinder head during the procedure. Removing the intake manifold will also give you easy access to the engine valley pan, knock sensors and coolant pipe.

When preparing to remove your intake manifold, be sure to have all the correct parts on hand and leave enough time in the day. I suggest plan for 1/2 a day. Also, be sure to have an assistant available to help lift the intake manifold out of the engine bay. The secondary air pipes are under the intake manifold. Nine out of ten times when removing the intake manifold these hoses break. Be sure to have replacements on hand should this happen to you.

Keep in mind that when your car was serviced before, parts may have been replaced with different size fasteners used in the replacement. The sizes of the nuts and bolts we give may be different from what you have, so be prepared with different size sockets and wrenches.

Protect your eyes, hands and body from fluids, dust and debris while working on your vehicle. If you're working with the electrical system, disconnect the battery before beginning. Always catch fluids in appropriate containers and properly dispose of any fluid waste. Recycle parts, packaging and fluids when possible. Never work on your vehicle if you feel the task is beyond your ability.

Vehicle models change and evolve as they grow older, so the vehicle shown in our illustrations may vary slightly from yours. If something seems different, let us know and share your info to help other users. Questions or want to add to the article? Leave a comment below. When leaving a comment, please leave your vehicle information.

Disconnect the negative (-) battery cable. See our tech article on battery connection notes.

Remove the engine covers. See our tech article on removing the engine covers.

The intake manifold is mounted in the valley of the engine (red arrow).
Figure 1

The intake manifold is mounted in the valley of the engine (red arrow).

First we have to remove the intake air duct that runs from the throttle housing (yellow arrow) to the mass airflow sensor (green arrow).
Figure 2

First we have to remove the intake air duct that runs from the throttle housing (yellow arrow) to the mass airflow sensor (green arrow).

Working at the fresh air intake, remove the four plastic rivets (green arrows).
Figure 3

Working at the fresh air intake, remove the four plastic rivets (green arrows). Use a pair of pliers (inset) to remove the center rivet. Once all the center rivets have been removed, pull the duct up to detach it from the vehicle.

Then lift the duct up on the left side while detaching it from the duct (green arrow) on the right side.
Figure 4

Then lift the duct up on the left side while detaching it from the duct (green arrow) on the right side.

Working at the mass airflow sensor, loosen the hose clamp using a flathead screwdriver (green arrow).
Figure 5

Working at the mass airflow sensor, loosen the hose clamp using a flathead screwdriver (green arrow).

Working at the throttle housing duct, loosen the hose clamp using a flathead screwdriver (green arrow).
Figure 6

Working at the throttle housing duct, loosen the hose clamp using a flathead screwdriver (green arrow).

Next, you will have to rotate the throttle-housing duct up toward the left side of the vehicle in the direction of the green arrow.
Figure 7

Next, you will have to rotate the throttle-housing duct up toward the left side of the vehicle in the direction of the green arrow. This will detach it from the mass airflow sensor. Once detached from the mass airflow sensor, pull the duct off the throttle housing. There are two small hoses you have to disconnect in the following step. Be careful not to damage them during this step.

Working at the bottom of the intake air duct, detach the plastic line by squeezing the release collar (green arrows) while pulling the line off the duct.
Figure 8

Working at the bottom of the intake air duct, detach the plastic line by squeezing the release collar (green arrows) while pulling the line off the duct. Then pull the vacuum hose (yellow arrow) straight off the duct to remove it.

When removing the duct, be sure not to misplace the rubber duct seal (green arrow).
Figure 9

When removing the duct, be sure not to misplace the rubber duct seal (green arrow). The seal will either stay inside the duct or remain attached to the throttle housing.

Working at the throttle housing, disconnect the electrical connector by squeezing the plastic release tabs (on top and bottom of connector) and pulling them off in the direction of the green arrow.
Figure 10

Working at the throttle housing, disconnect the electrical connector by squeezing the plastic release tabs (on top and bottom of connector) and pulling them off in the direction of the green arrow. Remove the four 10mm throttle housing fasteners (green arrows). Use a 1/4 ratchet with a two-inch extension to clear the surrounding components.

Working at the right front of the engine, remove the vacuum hose (red arrow) from the secondary air valve.
Figure 11

Working at the right front of the engine, remove the vacuum hose (red arrow) from the secondary air valve.

Next, you have to remove the secondary air solenoid and vacuum reservoir.
Figure 12

Next, you have to remove the secondary air solenoid and vacuum reservoir. Start by removing the 10mm fastener (yellow arrow). Then disconnect the electrical connector by pressing the release tab and pulling it straight off. Then follow the vacuum hose from the solenoid to the reservoir (green arrow) and disconnect it. Then remove the solenoid from the engine. Remove the 10mm fastener at the vacuum reservoir.

Unplug the camshaft shaft sensor electrical connector (green arrow) by pressing the release tab and pulling it straight out.
Figure 13

Unplug the camshaft shaft sensor electrical connector (green arrow) by pressing the release tab and pulling it straight out. Then disconnect the knock sensor (red arrow) electrical connector by pulling it straight out. Once the connectors are unplugged, remove the vacuum reservoir from the engine. Move to the right side of the engine and disconnect the knock and camshaft sensor electrical connectors.

When removing the vacuum reservoir, detach the hard plastic line from the holder (red arrow).
Figure 14

When removing the vacuum reservoir, detach the hard plastic line from the holder (red arrow). Then lift the reservoir (green arrow) up and pull off the mounting tab (yellow arrow).

Next, you have to disconnect the ignition coils and remove the wiring harness housing on each side of the engine.
Figure 15

Next, you have to disconnect the ignition coils and remove the wiring harness housing on each side of the engine. Start by removing the 10mm mounting nuts (green arrows). The front nuts have already been removed when the solenoid and vacuum reservoir were removed. Remove the remaining rear fasteners. Then remove the 10mm nut for the ignition coil ground (red arrow). Then disconnect each ignition coil (yellow arrows) by sliding the lock up and pulling the connector out of the coil. The left side is shown. Repeat these same steps for the right side.

The fuel injector harness is part of the housing and has to be removed next.
Figure 16

The fuel injector harness is part of the housing and has to be removed next. The harness is one solid plastic connector with individual connectors for each fuel injector. There are wire clips that hold the harness onto each fuel injector. You can disconnect each wire clip. Then pull the harness up off the fuel injectors. I like to use an alternative method. Use a small pry bar and lever between the harness (red arrows) and the fuel rail. When doing this, you have to use one swift action to disconnect the harness. Lever each connector off in the area of the red arrows. Be careful when using this method. If you lever at an angle or force an injector to move, you may damage a fuel injector. If a clip won't release, use a small pick to remove the wire retainer (inset). The left side is shown. Repeat these same steps for the right side.

Move to the rear of the left side electrical housing.
Figure 17

Move to the rear of the left side electrical housing. Locate the battery cable and remove it from the mount (red arrow).

Confirm that the left side of the electrical housing can be lifted and is free from all connections.
Figure 18

Confirm that the left side of the electrical housing can be lifted and is free from all connections. Let it rest on the engine. There are a few connectors on the right side remaining to do before we can move this out of our way.

Move to the right front of the engine.
Figure 19

Move to the right front of the engine. Disconnect the VANOS solenoid and coolant temp sensor electrical connectors (red arrows). Then remove the engine oil dipstick (yellow arrow).

Move the wiring harness (yellow arrow) from the engine side of the dipstick tube (red arrow).
Figure 20

Move the wiring harness (yellow arrow) from the engine side of the dipstick tube (red arrow). Then reinstall the dipstick.

Move the wiring harnesses (yellow arrow) to the right side of the engine and place it out of the way.
Figure 21

Move the wiring harnesses (yellow arrow) to the right side of the engine and place it out of the way. If needed, cut the zip tie at the rear of the harness (red arrow) to allow for move movement. Just remember to replace the zip tie when reassembling. Next, detach the vacuum hose from the right front of the intake manifold (green arrow) by pulling it straight off.

Move to the rear of the intake manifold.
Figure 22

Move to the rear of the intake manifold. The brake booster vacuum hose (green arrow) has to be removed. The brake booster vacuum hose is mounted in a rubber grommet (red arrow). Instead of cutting the clamp (yellow arrow) and pulling the hose off the plastic elbow, I like to pull the plastic elbow right out of the intake. To do this, pull the plastic elbow straight out of the grommet (red arrow). If needed, use silicone spray to lubricate the grommet.

Once out, lift the brake booster vacuum hose (red arrow) up, then separate the junction (yellow arrows).
Figure 23

Once out, lift the brake booster vacuum hose (red arrow) up, then separate the junction (yellow arrows).

Working at the rear of the intake manifold, loosen the breather hose clamps (red arrows).
Figure 24

Working at the rear of the intake manifold, loosen the breather hose clamps (red arrows). Then remove the breather hoses from the intake manifold (yellow arrows). Next, at the right rear of the intake manifold, remove the two 10mm oil separator mounting fasteners (green arrows). The oil separator remains on the engine when the intake is removed.

Working at the left strut tower, open the battery cable cover and remove the 19mm cable fastener (red arrow).
Figure 25

Working at the left strut tower, open the battery cable cover and remove the 19mm cable fastener (red arrow).

Feed the battery cable out from under the fuel rail (red arrow) and lay it aside.
Figure 26

Feed the battery cable out from under the fuel rail (red arrow) and lay it aside. Note the cable's correct routing for reinstallation.

Working at the left strut tower, remove the fuel line by pushing the release collar (red arrow) in toward the fuel line and hold it while pulling the fuel line in the direction of the green arrow.
Figure 27

Working at the left strut tower, remove the fuel line by pushing the release collar (red arrow) in toward the fuel line and hold it while pulling the fuel line in the direction of the green arrow. Have a rag handy to wrap the line. This will help to prevent fuel spillage.

Remove the ten 11mm intake manifold nuts (red arrows).
Figure 28

Remove the ten 11mm intake manifold nuts (red arrows). Use a magnet to extract the nuts once they are removed. The right side is shown. The left side is similar. Once the nuts have been removed, remove the insulators from each intake manifold stud (inset).

Slightly lift the intake manifold.
Figure 29

Slightly lift the intake manifold. Then at the left rear bottom corner, disconnect the vacuum line to the crankcase breather (red arrows). Remove the hose clamp by levering it off. Then pull the line off the breather valve. Lift the intake manifold up to remove it, untangling wires and hoses as you lift it. Once removed, cover the intake ports (green arrows) with tape (yellow arrows) to prevent debris from entering the cylinders.

With the intake manifold removed you can now replace the intake manifold gaskets.
Figure 30

With the intake manifold removed you can now replace the intake manifold gaskets. Lever them out of the intake using a small pick. When installing, line up the injector notch with the gasket notch (red arrows). Once you make repairs and install the new gaskets, tighten the intake manifold fasteners to 15Nm. Reassemble the intake components in the reverse order of removal. Be sure all hoses and electrical connectors are routed as they were when removed.

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Comments and Suggestions:
MERS Comments: Is this what you mean when you stated "The secondary air pipes are under the intake manifold. Nine out of ten times when removing the intake manifold these hoses break."

Secondary Air Injection Pipe - Control Valve to Vacuum Valve In-between Vacuum Hoses
August 19, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: When the intake is removed, it is common for the secondary air pipes to break. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Cory Comments: I've found my intake manifold is oily on the inside. You suggest replacing the "crankcase breather valve". I haven't found anything by that exact name, but did find "Intake Manifold Cover, Rear, with Non-Return Valve" P/N 11617508541. Is this what you are referring to? Thanks!
September 4, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Yes, that is the breather.


Give our parts specialists a call at 1-888-280-7799. They can figure out what part or repair kit you need.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 

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Page last updated: Fri 12/9/2016 02:46:30 AM