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M62 8 Cylinder Thermostat Replacement
 
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Pelican Technical Article:

M62 8 Cylinder Thermostat Replacement

Nick Czerula

Time:

3 hours3 hrs

Tab:

$100

Talent:

****

Tools:

flathead screwdriver, 10mm socket, plastic scraper

Applicable Models:

BMW X5 Sport Utility (2000-06)

Parts Required:

Thermostat, hoses, engine coolant

Hot Tip:

Work with a cool engine

Performance Gain:

Car will cool down again or restore function of heater

Complementary Modification:

Change radiator hoses

BMW E53 X5 models with the M62 8-Cylinder engine utilize an electrically-heated engine thermostat. The DME (engine control module) controls and monitors operation of the thermostat. If a fault occurs a code is stored in the DME, usually with a description of Map cooling circuit. A fault code can be present yet the vehicle will lack any cooling system issues, such as overheating. If you have this fault code, replace your thermostat and bleed your cooling system. Other symptoms of a faulty thermostat are engine overheating, slow to warm up and lack of heat. When replacing the thermostat, be sure to inspect the condition of the radiator hoses and radiator hose O-rings. It is a 50/50 shot if the O-ring on an old hose will reseal when reinstalling. If it does not reseal, you will have a coolant leak. If within your budget, replace the radiator hoses at the same time.

Drain the cooling system. See our tech article on cooling system draining and filling.

Remove the cooling fan. See our tech article on radiator cooling fan replacing.

First we have to remove the intake air duct that runs from the throttle housing (yellow arrow) to the mass air flow sensor (green arrow).
Figure 1

First we have to remove the intake air duct that runs from the throttle housing (yellow arrow) to the mass air flow sensor (green arrow).

Working at the fresh air intake, remove the four plastic rivets (green arrows).
Figure 2

Working at the fresh air intake, remove the four plastic rivets (green arrows). Use a pair of pliers (inset) to remove the center rivet. Once all the center rivets have been removed, pull the duct up to detach it from the vehicle.

Then lift the duct up on the left side while detaching it from the duct (green arrow) on the right side.
Figure 3

Then lift the duct up on the left side while detaching it from the duct (green arrow) on the right side.

Working at the mass air flow sensor, loosen the hose clamp using a flathead screwdriver (green arrow).
Figure 4

Working at the mass air flow sensor, loosen the hose clamp using a flathead screwdriver (green arrow).

Working at the throttle housing duct, loosen the hose clamp using a flathead screwdriver (green arrow).
Figure 5

Working at the throttle housing duct, loosen the hose clamp using a flathead screwdriver (green arrow).

Next you will have to rotate the throttle housing duct up toward the left side of the vehicle in the direction of the green arrow.
Figure 6

Next you will have to rotate the throttle housing duct up toward the left side of the vehicle in the direction of the green arrow. This will detach it from the mass air flow sensor. Once detached from the mass air flow sensor, pull the duct off the throttle housing. There are two small hoses you have to disconnect in the following step. Be careful not to damage them during this step.

Working at the bottom of the intake air duct, detach the plastic line by squeezing the release collar (green arrows) while pulling the line off the duct.
Figure 7

Working at the bottom of the intake air duct, detach the plastic line by squeezing the release collar (green arrows) while pulling the line off the duct. Then pull the vacuum hose (yellow arrow) straight off the duct to remove it.

When removing the duct, be sure not to misplace the rubber duct seal (green arrow).
Figure 8

When removing the duct, be sure not to misplace the rubber duct seal (green arrow). The seal will either stay inside the duct or remain attached to the throttle housing.

The thermostat is located at the front of the engine, just above the water pump (green arrow).
Figure 9

The thermostat is located at the front of the engine, just above the water pump (green arrow).

Working at the top of the thermostat, disconnect the thermostat electrical connector (green arrow) by pressing the wire release tab and pulling it off.
Figure 10

Working at the top of the thermostat, disconnect the thermostat electrical connector (green arrow) by pressing the wire release tab and pulling it off.

Working at the radiator hose connected to the thermostat, use a flathead screwdriver to lever out the coolant hose retaining clips (green arrow).
Figure 11

Working at the radiator hose connected to the thermostat, use a flathead screwdriver to lever out the coolant hose retaining clips (green arrow). Be sure to pull the retaining clips out until they rest at the stop (yellow arrow).

Next, remove the coolant hose from the thermostat.
Figure 12

Next, remove the coolant hose from the thermostat. This can be tricky. The hose has been attached to the thermostat for quite a while and may not come off easily. You will want to pull the hose off in the direction of the green arrow, while rocking it back and forth. Be careful not to damage the hose if you plan to reuse it. Once the hose moves off the thermostat slightly, you can use a flathead screwdriver to gently lever the hose off while pulling. Be very careful with this technique as everything you are prying on is made of plastic and can break.

Now it is time to remove the thermostat fasteners.
Figure 13

Now it is time to remove the thermostat fasteners. There are four 10mm fasteners (green arrows). First, remove the top rear corner fastener. It is hidden behind the thermostat connector in this photo. Use a 1/4-inch ratchet with a 10mm swivel socket and a four-inch extension to access it. Then remove the remaining three fasteners.

Remove the thermostat from the engine in the direction of the green arrow.
Figure 14

Remove the thermostat from the engine in the direction of the green arrow. Be prepared to catch dripping coolant in a drain pan.

Using a plastic scraper, clean the thermostat sealing surface (green arrow).
Figure 15

Using a plastic scraper, clean the thermostat sealing surface (green arrow). It is important not to use a metal scraper or razor blade here. You could damage the sealing surface and the thermostat seal will not seat properly, resulting in a leak. Once clean, confirm the sealing surface isn't pitted. It if is, it may not seal correctly. You may have to replace the water pump to repair it at this point. I see this happen more on older BMWs. If reusing the thermostat, be sure to replace the sealing O-ring (yellow arrow). Install a new thermostat and evenly tighten all fasteners. Install the coolant hose. Listen for an audible click to confirm the clip has engaged. A small amount of new coolant can be used to lubricate the coolant hose O-ring. This will make installing the hose easier. Connect the thermostat electrical connector. Install the cooling fan and fill and bleed the cooling system. Remember to check the cooling system for leaks and top up the coolant when complete.

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Page last updated: Wed 12/7/2016 02:41:18 AM