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M62 8 Cylinder Water Pump Replacement
 
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Pelican Technical Article:

M62 8 Cylinder Water Pump Replacement

Nick Czerula

Time:

3 hours3 hrs

Tab:

$100

Talent:

****

Tools:

flathead screwdriver, 10mm socket, plastic scraper

Applicable Models:

BMW X5 Sport Utility (2000-06)

Parts Required:

Water pump, hoses, engine coolant

Hot Tip:

Work with a cool engine

Performance Gain:

Car will cool down again or restore function of heater

Complementary Modification:

Change thermostat

When a coolant pump begins to fail, you'll notice that the car tends to overheat at low engine speed, such as sitting at a stoplight. When you accelerate, the engine temperature will drop. Now, this is not always indicative of a coolant pump, but a good starting point. You may also want to try squeezing the top radiator hose with the engine warmed up and running. You should feel pressure build up on the back of the hose and surge once it is released. If you feel no pressure, it's a fair bet that the coolant pump is failing. Sometimes, you can also see a slight drip coming from the coolant pump housing itself. These weep holes are cast into the pump housing and allow excess coolant to drain out if it has leaked past the various seals in the pump. The bearing can fail creating a grinding noise or creating free-play in the shaft also resulting in a coolant leak. The thermostat is attached to the right side of the coolant pump. It is not necessary to replace it when replacing your coolant pump. If it is within your budget, I would suggest doing so. At the minimum, replace the thermostat sealing O-ring.

Drain the cooling system. See our tech article on cooling system draining and filling.

Remove the cooling fan. See our tech article on radiator cooling fan replacing.

First we have to remove the intake air duct that runs from the throttle housing (yellow arrow) to the mass air flow sensor (green arrow).
Figure 1

First we have to remove the intake air duct that runs from the throttle housing (yellow arrow) to the mass air flow sensor (green arrow).

Working at the fresh air intake, remove the four plastic rivets (green arrows).
Figure 2

Working at the fresh air intake, remove the four plastic rivets (green arrows). Use a pair of pliers (inset) to remove the center rivet. Once all center rivets have been removed, pull the duct up to detach it from the vehicle.

Then lift the duct up on the left side while detaching it from the duct (green arrow) on the right side.
Figure 3

Then lift the duct up on the left side while detaching it from the duct (green arrow) on the right side.

Working at the mass air flow sensor, loosen the hose clamp using a flathead screwdriver (green arrow).
Figure 4

Working at the mass air flow sensor, loosen the hose clamp using a flathead screwdriver (green arrow).

Working at the throttle housing duct, loosen the hose clamp using a flathead screwdriver (green arrow).
Figure 5

Working at the throttle housing duct, loosen the hose clamp using a flathead screwdriver (green arrow).

Next you will have to rotate the throttle housing duct up toward the left side of the vehicle in the direction of the green arrow.
Figure 6

Next you will have to rotate the throttle housing duct up toward the left side of the vehicle in the direction of the green arrow. This will detach it from the mass air flow sensor. Once detached from the mass air flow sensor, pull the duct off the throttle housing. There are two small hoses you have to disconnect in the following step. Be careful not to damage them during this step.

Working at the bottom of the intake air duct, detach the plastic line by squeezing the release collar (green arrows) while pulling the line off the duct.
Figure 7

Working at the bottom of the intake air duct, detach the plastic line by squeezing the release collar (green arrows) while pulling the line off the duct. Then pull the vacuum hose (yellow arrow) straight off the duct to remove it.

When removing the duct, be sure not to misplace the rubber duct seal (green arrow).
Figure 8

When removing the duct, be sure not to misplace the rubber duct seal (green arrow). The seal will either stay inside the duct or remain attached to the throttle housing.

Loosen the four 10mm water pump pulley fasteners (green arrows).
Figure 9

Loosen the four 10mm water pump pulley fasteners (green arrows). Once loose, remove the drive belt. See our tech article on drive belt replacing.

Working at the top of the thermostat, disconnect the thermostat electrical connector (green arrow) by pressing the wire release tab and pulling it off.
Figure 10

Working at the top of the thermostat, disconnect the thermostat electrical connector (green arrow) by pressing the wire release tab and pulling it off.

Working at the radiator hose connected to the thermostat, use a flathead screwdriver to lever out the coolant hose retaining clips (green arrow).
Figure 11

Working at the radiator hose connected to the thermostat, use a flathead screwdriver to lever out the coolant hose retaining clips (green arrow). Be sure to pull the retaining clip out until they rest at the stop (yellow arrow).

Next, remove the coolant hose from the thermostat.
Figure 12

Next, remove the coolant hose from the thermostat. This can be tricky. The hose has been attached to the thermostat for quite a while and may not come off easily. You will want to pull the hose off in the direction of the green arrow, while rocking it back and forth. Be careful not to damage the hose if you plan to reuse it. Once the hose moves off the thermostat slightly, you can use a flathead screwdriver to gently lever the hose off while pulling. Be very careful with this technique as everything you are prying on is made of plastic and can break. Once the hose is removed, repeat the hose removal steps for the left side hose (yellow arrow).

Next, remove the coolant hose from the water pump.
Figure 13

Next, remove the coolant hose from the water pump. Use a flathead screwdriver to lever out the coolant hose retaining clips. Be sure to pull the retaining clip out until they rest at the stop. Then pull the hose off the water pump to remove it. When I removed the hose on our subject vehicle, the O-ring (green arrow) fell out of the hose. I replaced the hose, so as to not run into any issues when installing the new water pump.

Working at the front top of the water pump, remove the 5mm Allen fasteners (green arrow).
Figure 14

Working at the front top of the water pump, remove the 5mm Allen fasteners (green arrow).

Then, disconnect the coolant temperature sensor electrical connector by pulling it straight up and out of the sensor in the direction of the green arrow.
Figure 15

Then, disconnect the coolant temperature sensor electrical connector by pulling it straight up and out of the sensor in the direction of the green arrow.

Remove the four 10mm water pump pulley fasteners.
Figure 16

Remove the four 10mm water pump pulley fasteners. Next remove the water pump pulley from the water pump. If needed, gently lever the pulley off. Be careful not to bend it.

To make room for the water pump to be removed, the secondary air pipe (green arrows) has to be pulled out of the cylinder heads.
Figure 17

To make room for the water pump to be removed, the secondary air pipe (green arrows) has to be pulled out of the cylinder heads. Start by removing the secondary air valve vacuum hose (blue arrow). Then follow the pipe to the cylinder heads and remove the 10mm fastener (yellow arrows) at each side of the pipe. Once the fasteners are removed, pull the pipe straight out of the cylinder head.

Remove five 10mm water pump mounting fasteners.
Figure 18

Remove five 10mm water pump mounting fasteners. There are two on the right side of the pump (blue arrows), three on the left side (green arrows) and one on the bottom (yellow arrow). All of the fasteners except for the bottom one can be removed with a socket and ratchet. The bottom fastener is removed using an open end wrench. Note the location of the two long fasteners.

Using a large flathead screwdriver or prybar, gently lever the coolant pump away from the timing cover.
Figure 19

Using a large flathead screwdriver or prybar, gently lever the coolant pump away from the timing cover. Tilt the top of the coolant pump away from the engine as you lift. If needed, hold the coolant pipe (blue arrows) still when pulling the water pump off the engine.

With the coolant pump on the bench, remove the coolant temperature sensor (blue arrow) using a 22mm wrench.
Figure 20

With the coolant pump on the bench, remove the coolant temperature sensor (blue arrow) using a 22mm wrench. Install the coolant temperature sensor into the new coolant pump using a new sealing ring. If reusing the old thermostat (green arrow), remove the four 10mm fasteners and swap it over to the new water pump. Yellow arrows point to the short fastener location and red arrows point to the long fastener location.

Before installing a new coolant pump, thoroughly clean the water pump mounting surface (green arrow) and check for debris inside the coolant pump cavity (inside timing cover).
Figure 21

Before installing a new coolant pump, thoroughly clean the water pump mounting surface (green arrow) and check for debris inside the coolant pump cavity (inside timing cover). Replace the coolant pipe O-rings (yellow arrows). Install the gasket to the engine, aligning with the dowels (red arrows). Install the coolant pump. Once in, install the lower fastener a few turns. Hand tighten the remaining fasteners in a crisscross pattern. Once the water pump is flush with the engine, tighten all of the fasteners. Install the water pump pulley and tighten the fasteners. Install the engine drive belt, cooling fan, and fill and bleed the cooling system. Once complete, check the cooling system for leaks and top up the cooling system.

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Comments and Suggestions:
Jack Comments: There are two water pump guided pin or dowel on hole for long fasteners/bolts. Anybody do this job should put the dowels on first so that you can hung gasket on them which make installation a lot easier.
November 22, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thanks for the additional info and feedback. We appreciate it.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
Jack Comments: I have coolant leaking from a hole BEHIND black wheel at bottom on Figure 20. Is that a weeping hole for the water pumper center rod failure. Water pump is manufacture one put one one year ago.
November 18, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: It is a weep hole for coolant that passes the bearing seal. Likely a fault pump. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Spook Comments: I've replaced my pump on my E53 4.4, but now I've got a hose spare. The engine runs with no leaks, but has a sound like an exhaust leak - I suspect it is an air hose. It is about 45cm long and metal with a rubber bend, and I seem to recall unbolting it from the tensioner area. I need to know where it goes!!!
November 1, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Looks like an air hose. Look for an open hose at the front timing cover. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Crunch Comments: Ugggg. Do you have an article on how to get to that back pipe to do this? I can't seem to find one.
October 8, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: http://www.pelicanparts.com/techarticles/BMW-X5/102-ENGINE-Engine_Valley_Pan_and_Coolant_Pipes_Removal/102-ENGINE-Engine_Valley_Pan_and_Coolant_Pipes_Removal.htm - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Crunch Comments: I have a question about step 19 and the 2 coolant pipes that run to the back of the engine. In pulling my pump, they both came out. I managed to find the holes and get them pushed back in, but do I need to now replace the 2 o-rings on the back of the engine too?
October 7, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: I would replace them. Corrosion or debris could get in the sealing grooves when they fell out. - Nick at Pelican Parts  

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Page last updated: Wed 12/7/2016 02:41:15 AM