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M62 8-Cylinder Spark Plug Coil Replacement
 
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Pelican Technical Article:

M62 8-Cylinder Spark Plug Coil Replacement

Nick Czerula

Time:

2 hours2 hrs

Tab:

$100

Talent:

***

Tools:

10mm socket, 5/8 thin-wall spark plug socket, flathead screwdrivers

Applicable Models:

BMW X5 Sport Utility (2000-06)

Parts Required:

Spark plugs, Ignitions coils

Hot Tip:

Work with a cool engine

Performance Gain:

Engine runs well

Complementary Modification:

Change air filter at same time

Replacing the spark plugs on your BMW E53 with an M62 8-cylinder is part of routine maintenance. BMW recommends replacing the spark plugs on E53 M62 8-cylinder models every 60,000 miles and E53 M62TU 8-cylinder models every 100,000 miles. With all the major engine design changes over the years, spark plugs now last up to three times as long as they did in years past. This is good and bad. It means you save money and time not having to service them so frequently, but run the risk of a spark plug seizing in the cylinder head. I suggest replacing your spark plugs every three years regardless of mileage. If the last time they were serviced is unknown, replace them right away.

When servicing your spark plugs, be sure the engine is cool and leave yourself about two hours to do the job. Be careful not to drop a spark plug, if you do, replace it. The spark plug insulator can crack and can lead to an engine misfire.

Remove the engine covers. See our tech article on engine cover removing.

BMW E53 X5 models with an 8-cylinder engine utilize an individual ignition coil for each spark plug, also referred to as coil over plug (green arrows).
Figure 1

BMW E53 X5 models with an 8-cylinder engine utilize an individual ignition coil for each spark plug, also referred to as coil over plug (green arrows).

I will show you how to replace a coil and spark plug on the left side of the engine (green arrow).
Figure 2

I will show you how to replace a coil and spark plug on the left side of the engine (green arrow). All other cylinders are similar. If you disconnect a ground strap during the procedure, be sure it is installed in the same place and position it was removed from.

Using a flathead screwdriver, lever the ignition coil electrical connector lock up in the direction of the green arrow.
Figure 3

Using a flathead screwdriver, lever the ignition coil electrical connector lock up in the direction of the green arrow. You can slide the connector out of the coil at this point, or wait until you remove the coil from the engine.

Remove two 10mm ignition coil mounting nuts (yellow arrows).
Figure 4

Remove two 10mm ignition coil mounting nuts (yellow arrows).

Remove the ignition coil from the cylinder head by pulling straight up (green arrow).
Figure 5

Remove the ignition coil from the cylinder head by pulling straight up (green arrow). If the coil resists, twist when pulling it up to break it free from the spark plug. The ignition coil rubber boot can become stuck to the spark plug over time.

Using a 5/8 thin-wall spark plug socket on a 12” extension, remove the spark plug from the cylinder head.
Figure 6

Using a 5/8 thin-wall spark plug socket on a 12" extension, remove the spark plug from the cylinder head. Lightly lubricate the new spark plugs threads with copper based anti-seize. Thread the spark plugs into the cylinder head by hand. This will prevent accidental cross-threading. Torque the spark plugs to 25 Nm (18 ft-lb). Reinstall the ignition coils and reconnect the electrical connectors. Be sure to route the wiring harness as it was before and connect the ignition coil grounds. Install the engine covers and check your work.

If you find engine oil has contaminated the ignition coil boot (red arrow) you will have to repair the oil leak and replace the ignition coil.
Figure 7

If you find engine oil has contaminated the ignition coil boot (red arrow) you will have to repair the oil leak and replace the ignition coil. The source of the oil leak will likely be the valve cover gasket. Oil can be seen on the spark plug (yellow arrow) and inside the spark plug bore (green arrow). The oil is from a leaking valve cover gasket.

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Comments and Suggestions:
Rob Comments: A good mechanic friend of mine says the blue puff of smoke on extended idle can be blamed on the valve stem seals not to be confused with tire valve stems. It's billed at 30+ hours of labor if you take it to a specialty shop german vehicle mechanic since you have to individually replace every valve seal. I had my valve cover gaskets replaced, along with upper timing chain gaskets since they were in the same area and the valve covers were off. It did not solve the issue. Make sure you get it properly diagnosed so you don't waste time or money, and also because leaking valve stem seals may not be the only issue to your blue smoke.IMO, it's worth the diagnostic fee from a reputable place to have them go over your car with a fined tooth comb. Then you can prioritize any maintenance.
April 12, 2017
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thanks for sharing your information with us. These type of comments add so much to the Pelican tech community. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
John Comments: In addition to the oil on the end of the plug and coil, would a leaking valve cover gasket cause a blue puff of smoke out of the tailpipe on acceleration after an extended idle?
September 24, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Not usually. - Nick at Pelican Parts  

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Page last updated: Wed 7/26/2017 02:26:27 AM