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M62 8-Cylinder Engine Camshaft Position Sensor Replacing
 
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Pelican Technical Article:

M62 8-Cylinder Engine Camshaft Position Sensor Replacing

Nick Czerula

Time:

2 hours2 hrs

Tab:

$60

Talent:

**

Tools:

Sockets, 5mm Allen, 10mm, flathead screwdriver

Applicable Models:

BMW X5 Sport Utility (2000-06)

Parts Required:

Camshaft position sensors

Hot Tip:

Work with a cool engine

Performance Gain:

Remedy a check engine light and restore engine performance

Complementary Modification:

Replace both sensors at same time

The camshaft position sensor is used to synchronize fuel injection and as a feedback device for VANOS (variable camshaft timing) control. When a camshaft sensor fails, the check engine light will illuminate and a fault code will be stored. I have seen faulty sensors cause engine stalling and poor engine drivability. If you have a camshaft sensor fault code and your engine isn't running right, I suggest replacing the sensor before digging too deep.

When you are dealing with camshaft position fault codes, be sure to test the sensor and confirm it is faulty. Other items could also set a camshaft position fault code, for example a dirty or defective VANOS solenoid or unit, faulty camshaft timing or a wiring issue. See our tech article on camshaft position testing for information on how to test the sensors and wiring.

Remove the engine covers. See our tech article on engine cover removing.

In this article, I'll go over the steps involved with replacing the camshaft position sensors on BMW E53 models with an M62 8-cylinder engine.
Figure 1

In this article, I'll go over the steps involved with replacing the camshaft position sensors on BMW E53 models with an M62 8-cylinder engine. Be sure to work with a cool engine. The intake camshaft sensors are located at the timing cover (green arrows). On M62 TU engines, there is also an exhaust sensor, located in the timing cover, a little lower (yellow arrow). Our subject vehicle only has intake sensors. I will show you how to replace them. The procedure for a vehicle with exhaust sensors is similar.

Using a BMW scan tool, read the fault codes to identify which sensor requires replacement (green arrow).
Figure 2

Using a BMW scan tool, read the fault codes to identify which sensor requires replacement (green arrow). Bank 1 is the right side of the engine, bank 2 is the left side of the engine.

First we have to remove the intake air duct that runs from the throttle housing (yellow arrow) to the mass air flow sensor (green arrow).
Figure 3

First we have to remove the intake air duct that runs from the throttle housing (yellow arrow) to the mass air flow sensor (green arrow).

Working at the fresh air intake, remove the four plastic rivets (green arrows).
Figure 4

Working at the fresh air intake, remove the four plastic rivets (green arrows). Use a pair of pliers (inset) to remove the center rivet. Once all center rivets have been removed, pull the duct up to detach it from the vehicle.

Then lift the duct up on the left side while detaching it from the duct (green arrow) on the right side.
Figure 5

Then lift the duct up on the left side while detaching it from the duct (green arrow) on the right side.

Working at the mass air flow sensor, loosen the hose clamp using a flathead screwdriver (green arrow).
Figure 6

Working at the mass air flow sensor, loosen the hose clamp using a flathead screwdriver (green arrow).

Working at the throttle housing duct, loosen the hose clamp using a flathead screwdriver (green arrow).
Figure 7

Working at the throttle housing duct, loosen the hose clamp using a flathead screwdriver (green arrow).

Next, you will have to rotate the throttle-housing duct up toward the left side of the vehicle in the direction of the green arrow.
Figure 8

Next, you will have to rotate the throttle-housing duct up toward the left side of the vehicle in the direction of the green arrow. This will detach it from the mass air flow sensor. Once detached from the mass air flow sensor, pull the duct off the throttle housing. There are two small hoses you have to disconnect in the following step. Be careful not to damage them during this step.

Working at the bottom of the intake air duct, detach the plastic line by squeezing the release collar (green arrows) while pulling the line off the duct.
Figure 9

Working at the bottom of the intake air duct, detach the plastic line by squeezing the release collar (green arrows) while pulling the line off the duct. Then pull the vacuum hose (yellow arrow) straight off the duct to remove it.

The sensor is mounted in the timing cover (yellow arrow).
Figure 10

The sensor is mounted in the timing cover (yellow arrow). The wiring harness runs up and over the timing cover to the electrical junction box (green arrow).

Disconnect the camshaft sensor electrical connector by pressing the retaining wire and pulling the connector straight off the electrical junction box.
Figure 11

Disconnect the camshaft sensor electrical connector by pressing the retaining wire and pulling the connector straight off the electrical junction box.

Remove the camshaft position sensor 5mm Allen fastener.
Figure 12

Remove the camshaft position sensor 5mm Allen fastener. BMW suggests replacing the fastener each time it is removed. That is because it comes with Loctite on the threads. When reinstalling, apply blue Loctite to the threads.

Pull the camshaft position sensor out of the cylinder head.
Figure 13

Pull the camshaft position sensor out of the cylinder head. Have a rag nearby in case some oil drips out of the cylinder head when the sensor is removed. The sensor O-ring will likely stay in the timing cover when the sensor is removed. Use a flathead screwdriver to remove the O-ring (green arrow) from the timing cover. Be careful not to scratch the sealing surface.

Install the camshaft sensor in the reverse order of removing.
Figure 14

Install the camshaft sensor in the reverse order of removing. Replace the O-ring (yellow arrow) every time the sensor is removed from the cylinder head. Lubricate the O-ring with clean engine oil to ease installation. Be sure the sensor is flush with the timing cover before installing the fastener (green arrow).

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Comments and Suggestions:
Jasper Comments: Nick, thanks for prompt response. I replaced my camshaft position sensors today, the O2 sensors fault went away. The vehicle runs better and the rotten egg smell is gone.
I will check the tensioner tomorrow it was replace two year ago.

thank you again for the advise.
October 10, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thanks for the follow up. We appreciate it.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
Jasper Comments: I have the same vehicle my dashboard light does not comes on, however it's throwing codes P0011, P0021, P0154, and P0135; when I hooked up a OBDII reader. Also lately my engine bank 1 it's making rattle hollow sound.
October 9, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: If you have a rattle and the codes listed, your timing components may be worn. Possible bad tensioner or a worn guide or rail. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Andrew Comments: Hi any chance you could advise of this job on an N62 engine 545i? Struggling to find exactly where the sensors are buried in my engine. Thanks
February 2, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: They are mounted in the front timing covers.

Give our parts specialists a call at 1-888-280-7799. They can figure out what part or repair kit you need.


All of our E60 articles are here:

http://www.pelicanparts.com/BMW/techarticles/tech_main_e60.htm #fuelinjection - Nick at Pelican Parts
 
Junior Comments: 2003 bmw x5 4.4
November 2, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Ok, got it. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Junior Comments: Check engine light go's on and off,up it on the scanner and it showed the camshaft sensor replaced both of them and still showing the same code now what please help thanks
November 2, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: What is the vehicle and what is the fault code number? - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Ultravioletray Comments: In figure 9, what happens if your break the vacuum hose at the connector? 😕
August 17, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: You will have to replace it, or risk an (unmetered) air leak.

Give our parts specialists a call at 1-888-280-7799. They can figure out what part or repair kit you need.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 

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Page last updated: Fri 12/2/2016 02:23:05 AM