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NG6 Engine Intake Manifold Replacement
 
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Pelican Technical Article:

NG6 Engine Intake Manifold Replacement

Nick Czerula

Time:

4 hours4 hrs

Tab:

$200

Talent:

*****

Tools:

Set of sockets, wrenches, screwdrivers

Applicable Models:

BMW 525i Sedan (2006-07)
BMW 528i Sedan (2008-10)
BMW 530i Sedan (2006-07)
BMW 530xi Sedan/Wagon (2006-07)

Parts Required:

Intake manifold gaskets, aluminum fastener set

Hot Tip:

Work with a cool engine

Performance Gain:

Repair vacuum leaks from old gaskets

Complementary Modification:

Replace intake air ducts

The intake manifold on BMW E60 cars with normally aspirated NG6 (new generation) engines are equipped with 3-stage variable-length intake runners. Low end torque and high end power are improved by varying the intake runner length according to a map stored in the engine control module (ECM). Engine vacuum, load and ambient temperature are used by the ECM to determine the rpm at which to switch the intake manifold configuration. The changes in the intake manifold configuration are controlled by the ECM, which drives small electric motors to control two flap valves inside the intake manifold. Each flap valve has two possible positions: open or closed.

  • Both flap valves are closed for idle and the low engine speed range.
  • Flap valves open for medium engine speed.
  • Both flap valves are wide open for high speed engine and high power output.

Another function of the design is that resonance waves inside the manifold pulse back and forth between opening and closing intake valves and help in cylinder filling.

The intake manifold in these models utilizes profile style gaskets to seal against the cylinder head. Over time the gaskets harden from heat or they swell from oil contamination. If you have a hard to find vacuum leak, replace your intake manifold gaskets. If you find oil inside your intake manifold, replace the crankcase breather valve. Clean the inside of the intake manifold thoroughly and be careful not to get any debris inside the cylinder head during the procedure. Removing the intake manifold will also give you easy access to the engine starter or knock sensors.

When preparing to remove your intake manifold, be sure to have all the correct parts on hand and leave enough time in the day. I suggest planning for one-half a day. The crankcase breather valve is located at the rear of the intake manifold. There is a breather pipe that runs from the valve cover to the crankcase breather valve. Nine out of ten times when removing the intake manifold this breather hose breaks, so be sure to have one on hand.

In this tech article, I will go over how to replace the intake manifold on a normally aspirated engine. Some photos are from similar engines and models.

Keep in mind that when your car was serviced before, parts may have been replaced with different size fasteners used in the replacement. The sizes of the nuts and bolts we give may be different from what you have, so be prepared with different size sockets and wrenches.

Protect your eyes, hands and body from fluids, dust and debris while working on your vehicle. If you're working with the electrical system, disconnect the battery before beginning. Always catch fluids in appropriate containers and properly dispose of any fluid waste. Recycle parts, packaging and fluids when possible. Do not work on your vehicle if you feel the task is beyond your ability.

Vehicle models change and evolve as they grow older, so the vehicle shown in our illustrations may vary slightly from yours. If something seems different, let us know and share your info to help other users. Do you have questions or want to add to the article? Leave a comment below. When leaving a comment, please leave your vehicle information.

Disconnect the negative (-) battery cable. See our tech article on battery connection notes.

Remove the engine covers and cabin microfilter housing. See our tech article on engine covers removing.

Working at the intake air duct, remove the brake booster hose from the plastic mounts and move it aside.
Figure 1

Working at the intake air duct, remove the brake booster hose from the plastic mounts and move it aside.

Working at the right side of the brake booster, pull the vacuum supply hose with check valve (red arrow) out of the brake booster.
Figure 2

Working at the right side of the brake booster, pull the vacuum supply hose with check valve (red arrow) out of the brake booster. Be careful not to break or damage the check valve. If you do or suspect it is cracked, replace it. If it is stuck, spray soapy water around the valve to help getting it out. Once out, remove the vacuum hose from the bulkhead grommet and lay it aside.

To remove the alternator and access the electrical connections at the rear of the alternator, remove the air filter housing assembly (yellow arrow).
Figure 3

To remove the alternator and access the electrical connections at the rear of the alternator, remove the air filter housing assembly (yellow arrow). Remove the two T30 Torx fasteners (red arrow).

Then disconnect the air flow meter electrical connector (yellow arrow).
Figure 4

Then disconnect the air flow meter electrical connector (yellow arrow). Now loosen the air flow meter clamp (green arrow).

Next, unclip the three air filter lid clips (green arrows).
Figure 5

Next, unclip the three air filter lid clips (green arrows).

Once unclipped, lift the air filter-housing lid out of the engine compartment.
Figure 6

Once unclipped, lift the air filter-housing lid out of the engine compartment. 

Once the lid has been removed, you can remove the lower housing to make more room to work.
Figure 7

Once the lid has been removed, you can remove the lower housing to make more room to work. This is not necessary, but can be helpful. Lift the air filter housing out of the engine compartment. Lift the rear of the housing first, detaching it from the fresh air duct (red arrow). Once the intake air-housing lid is removed, loosen the hose clamp for the duct attached to the throttle housing. Pull the duct straight off the throttle housing to remove it.

Working at the throttle housing, disconnect the electrical connector (green arrow) by pressing the plastic release tab and pulling it straight off.
Figure 8

Working at the throttle housing, disconnect the electrical connector (green arrow) by pressing the plastic release tab and pulling it straight off.

Pull the wiring harnesses and battery cable out of the rubber holders (green arrows).
Figure 9

Pull the wiring harnesses and battery cable out of the rubber holders (green arrows). Then disconnect the MAP sensor electrical connector by pressing the release tab and pulling it off (yellow arrow).

Working at the oil filter housing, disconnect the oil pressure sensor by pressing the retaining spring and pulling it off (green arrow).
Figure 10

Working at the oil filter housing, disconnect the oil pressure sensor by pressing the retaining spring and pulling it off (green arrow).

Working at the rear of the intake manifold, remove the fuel line T25 Torx mounting fastener (green arrow).
Figure 11

Working at the rear of the intake manifold, remove the fuel line T25 Torx mounting fastener (green arrow). Then disconnect the crankcase breather hose from the valve cover by squeezing the collar and pulling it off (yellow arrow). This is the breather hose that breaks 99% of the time. Be sure to have a new one on hand.

Next, remove the two electrical connectors at the top of the intake manifold (yellow arrow).
Figure 12

Next, remove the two electrical connectors at the top of the intake manifold (yellow arrow). Press the release tab and slide them down and away from the intake to remove them. Once these are off, you have to remove the wiring harness junction box under the throttle body (green arrow).

The wiring harness junction box (green arrow) is held on by two tabs on the metal mounting bracket.
Figure 13

The wiring harness junction box (green arrow) is held on by two tabs on the metal mounting bracket. To remove it, slide it away from the throttle body while releasing the tabs. I like to use a small flathead screwdriver. This can be a challenge. Slide it forward as you press down on the tabs with the screwdriver.

Remove the seven 11mm intake manifold nuts (green arrows).
Figure 14

Remove the seven 11mm intake manifold nuts (green arrows). Once the fasteners have been removed, lift the intake manifold up and off the cylinder head to gain access to items behind it.

Slide the intake manifold away from the cylinder head to access the hoses and electrical connectors.
Figure 15

Slide the intake manifold away from the cylinder head to access the hoses and electrical connectors. The green arrow points to an electrical connector you have to disconnect. The yellow arrow points to a crankcase breather hose you have to disconnect. You'll have to reach around the rear of the intake manifold and feel your way to the hose. Squeeze the collar and pull it off the crankcase breather valve.

Next, reach behind the crankcase breather valve (yellow arrow) and disconnect the crankcase breather valve heater element electrical connectors (green arrow).
Figure 16

Next, reach behind the crankcase breather valve (yellow arrow) and disconnect the crankcase breather valve heater element electrical connectors (green arrow). This photo shows the intake removed. It is nearly impossible to see, so you will have to feel your way around.

Working below the throttle body, disconnect the purge solenoid electrical connector (yellow arrow) and remove the hose (green arrow).
Figure 17

Working below the throttle body, disconnect the purge solenoid electrical connector (yellow arrow) and remove the hose (green arrow). Take one last look and check that all items have been disconnected and there is nothing left to snag the intake manifold. Remove the intake manifold from the engine. Once removed, seal the intake ports to prevent debris from entering the cylinder head. Before installing, replace the intake manifold gaskets. Remove the old ones by prying them out with a small flathead screwdriver. Install new gaskets by pressing them in. Check that all gaskets are properly seated before installing the intake manifold. If you plan to replace your crankcase breather valve, now is a good time. You have great access to it and can easily connect the hoses. See our tech article on crankcase breather valve replacing. This only applies to vehicles with an aluminum valve cover. Plastic valve cover models have the crankcase breather valve integrated into the valve cover. Remove the item you used to seal the intake ports on the cylinder head. Then install the cylinder head to the engine and tighten the fasteners in an alternating pattern. Reinstall the removed items in the reverse order of removal. Double check the wiring harness routing and fuel line connections. Once complete, let the engine idle for about 10 minutes. If you left something disconnected or an item is misrouted, it is best to find out before driving.




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Comments and Suggestions:
Dub Comments: On Fig. 11, how do i tell if the breather hose is broken?
Thank you.
August 18, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: is will have a crack and not be in one piece. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Andxsurf Comments: What is the part # for the crankcase breather hose in figure 11? I have an '06 530xi
May 13, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: I’m not the best with part numbers.

Give our parts specialists a call at 1-888-280-7799. They can figure out what part or repair kit you need.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
Oakie Comments: ISSUE #2...Important!!

After removal of the manifold and replacing the starter....i placed everything back...and when I went to start the car...a check engine light came on and said "tranny malfunction"..
Something...depressing brakes...

So the car rides but the gears don't switch...it only goes to 20-25mph..Need help!!!

New battery
New alternator
New starter...

What can it be...i read that it can be that senor wiring that plugs underneath the starter...with the green color label...mine is plugged in and still says "tranny malfunction"...can it.be a.bad wiring?...but man removing everything again is going to be a headach
..
January 14, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: You will need to read the fault code. Once you have the code, you will be able to identify the component with the fault. Then likely find it unplugged or not connected correctly. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Oakie Comments: On photo #12...the Yellow arrows are point to an electrical socket...

What does it connects to?
Because I recently took off my manifold and plugged every wire back and I see those 2 wire socket with nothing plugged into them...

I wonder if something plugs into it or it just like that. .

Thank you
January 14, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: That is for engines with DISA, if you don't have DISA, they go no where. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
wick Comments: Have a 2006525xi 6 cylinder and when attemping to remove the intake, the 2 and 3 bolts from the back have a bracket attached. Besides the 2 intake bolts are there any other bolts holding this bracket on?
October 28, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Not more than is shown in the article. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Robert Comments: Hello

I need some help if is possibile, I remove my intake manifold for replacing a starter motor and a have a little problem I fogot exact positions for electrical connectors crankcase ventilation heater with 4 connection for ventilation pipes. Some help with positions for this connectors ?

Thank you very much

Robert
September 23, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Install them so the lines have some slack and none are stretched to reach. Order does not matter as long as the wiring is not too tight. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Lenny Comments: there is a hose tethered to the belly of the intake manifold and the floor of the car, it is difficult to remove from the bottom of the car, dont know if it is even removable hope so because i broke it. what is it called please?
August 20, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Can you share your vehicle info and a photo of the hose or describe it better? - Nick at Pelican Parts  

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Page last updated: Wed 12/7/2016 02:43:51 AM