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M54 Engine Intake Manifold Replacement
 
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Pelican Technical Article:

M54 Engine Intake Manifold Replacement

Nick Czerula

Time:

4 hours4 hrs

Tab:

$250

Talent:

*****

Tools:

Set of sockets (8mm, 10mm, 13mm), wrenches, screwdrivers, fuel line socket, torque wrench

Applicable Models:

BMW 525i Sedan (2004-05)
BMW 530i Sedan (2004-05)

Parts Required:

Intake manifold gaskets, hose clamps, fuel line hose clamps, fuel line O-rings, coolant hoses and pipes

Hot Tip:

Work with a cool engine

Performance Gain:

Repair vacuum leaks from old gaskets

Complementary Modification:

Replace crankcase vent valve or coolant hoses

On the 6-cylinder M54 engine installed in BMW E60 vehicles, the molded plastic intake manifold is configured as two sets of three runners with variable lengths. Low end torque and high end power are improved by varying the intake runner length according to a map stored in the ECM. Engine vacuum, load and ambient temperature are used by the ECM to determine the rpm at which to switch intake manifold configuration. The actuator used by the ECM to switch manifold configuration is a vacuum solenoid called the dual resonance intake system or DISA valve.

At low to mid-range engine speeds (up to about 3,750 rpm), engine torque is increased as the DISA valve closes a flap inside the manifold, effectively increasing the length of the intake runners.

From mid-range to high engine speeds (4,100 rpm and higher), DISA is de-energized. This opens the resonance flap inside the intake manifold and allows air to be drawn into cylinders through additional intake runners. This provides extra air for the power needed at higher rpms.

Another function of the design is that resonance waves inside the manifold pulse back and forth between opening and closing intake valves and help in cylinder filling.

If you have a hard-to-find vacuum leak, replace your intake manifold gaskets. If you find oil inside your intake manifold, replace the crankcase breather valve. Clean the inside of the intake manifold thoroughly and be careful not to get any debris inside the cylinder head during the procedure. Removing the intake manifold will also give you easy access to the engine starter, knock sensors or coolant pipes and hoses.

BMW E60 models with an M54 6-cylinder engine utilize a runner profile style gasket for the intake manifold. Over time, the gaskets harden from heat or they swell from oil contamination.

It's a good idea to relieve the fuel system pressure before beginning. This will minimize the amount of fuel spilled. The best way to relieve fuel system pressure is to remove the fuel pump fuse and run the vehicle until the engine stalls. How to do this is described later in this procedure.

Keep in mind that when your car was serviced before, parts may have been replaced with different size fasteners used in the replacement. The sizes of the nuts and bolts we give may be different from what you have, so be prepared with different size sockets and wrenches.

Protect your eyes, hands and body from fluids, dust and debris while working on your vehicle. If you're working with the electrical system, disconnect the battery before beginning. Always catch fluids in appropriate containers and properly dispose of any fluid waste. Recycle parts, packaging and fluids when possible. Do not work on your vehicle if you feel the task is beyond your ability.

Vehicle models change and evolve as they grow older, so the vehicle shown in our illustrations may vary slightly from yours. If something seems different, let us know and share your info to help other users. Do you have questions or want to add to the article? Leave a comment below. When leaving a comment, please leave your vehicle information.

Remove the engine covers and microfilter housing. See our tech article on engine cover removing.

Working at the left strut tower, remove the two Phillips head screws.
Figure 1

Working at the left strut tower, remove the two Phillips head screws. Then remove the plastic expanding anchor by pulling them straight up (green arrows). Unclip the plastic cover (yellow arrow) from the strut tower.

Remove the strut tower plastic cover from the vehicle.
Figure 2

Remove the strut tower plastic cover from the vehicle. Remove the right side plastic cover.

Working at the left strut tower, remove the T45 Torx fastener (red arrow).
Figure 3

Working at the left strut tower, remove the T45 Torx fastener (red arrow). Then move to the right strut tower and remove the same fastener.

Working at the center of the wiper cowl above the valve cover, remove the two T45 Torx fasteners (red arrows).
Figure 4

Working at the center of the wiper cowl above the valve cover, remove the two T45 Torx fasteners (red arrows).

Unclip the battery cable from the strut tower brace by opening the mount (red arrow).
Figure 5

Unclip the battery cable from the strut tower brace by opening the mount (red arrow). Then remove the strut tower brace from the vehicle.

Remove fuses F72 in the engine electrical box (check that this fuse applies to your vehicle).
Figure 6

Remove fuses F72 in the engine electrical box (check that this fuse applies to your vehicle). Start and run the engine until it stalls. Once the engine stalls, attempt to start it again. If it does not start, the fuel system pressure has been relieved. Keep in mind: this does not remove all the fuel from the fuel lines, only the pressure. So you still need to be prepared to catch leaking fuel when the fuel lines are disconnected. Working at the fuel rail, remove the fuel test port cap (green arrow). Then place a rag over the Schrader valve and open the valve with a flathead screwdriver (yellow arrow) to relieve any remaining pressure. Disconnect the negative (-) battery cable. See our tech article on Battery connection notes. Remove the DISA valve. See our tech article on DISA valve replacing.

Working at the top of the intake manifold, locate the oxygen sensor connectors.
Figure 7

Working at the top of the intake manifold, locate the oxygen sensor connectors. Slide (green arrows) both connectors out of the mounting bracket and lay them aside. Then lift the other two oxygen sensor connectors (yellow arrows) up and out of the mounting brackets and lay the harness aside.

Working at the fuel rail, remove the oxygen sensor connector mounts (green arrows) by squeezing and pulling toward the left side of the engine.
Figure 8

Working at the fuel rail, remove the oxygen sensor connector mounts (green arrows) by squeezing and pulling toward the left side of the engine.

In this step I am removing the plastic mount for the front oxygen sensor connectors.
Figure 9

In this step I am removing the plastic mount for the front oxygen sensor connectors. You can skip this and leave it on if you are only replacing injectors. If you are replacing the fuel rail, you will have to remove and swap this over. Using a flathead screwdriver (yellow arrow) unclip the retaining tabs (green arrows) to remove the plastic mount.

Working at the front of the intake manifold, squeeze the crankcase vent hose (green arrow) release tabs and pull it off the intake manifold.
Figure 10

Working at the front of the intake manifold, squeeze the crankcase vent hose (green arrow) release tabs and pull it off the intake manifold.

Then, rotate the hose toward the wiper cowl to move it out of the way.
Figure 11

Then, rotate the hose toward the wiper cowl to move it out of the way.

Working at the intake VANOS solenoid, disconnect the VANOS solenoid electrical connector by releasing the wire (green arrow) and pulling it off.
Figure 12

Working at the intake VANOS solenoid, disconnect the VANOS solenoid electrical connector by releasing the wire (green arrow) and pulling it off.

Then release the fuel injector harness strip from the fuel injectors and remove it.
Figure 13

Then release the fuel injector harness strip from the fuel injectors and remove it. I find the easiest way to do this is to use a flathead screwdriver and gently pry it up at each fuel injector (green arrows). This will release the spring clips that hold the electrical harness to the fuel injectors. If stuck, try a swift action to detach the connector.

Work your way down the injectors while disconnecting the injector harness.
Figure 14

Work your way down the injectors while disconnecting the injector harness. Lay the fuel injector harness aside.

Working at the left strut tower, disconnect the fuel line.
Figure 15

Working at the left strut tower, disconnect the fuel line. Remove the gray safety collar (green arrow) by pulling it straight off the line. Then press and hold the release collar (blue arrow) while pulling it apart. Have a rag handy to catch any dripping fuel. Follow the fuel line behind the intake manifold, near the firewall. You can see the line, but you will have to do this part mostly by feel. Reach behind the intake manifold and repeat the steps used to disconnect the line near the strut tower.

Working at the left front corner of the cylinder head cover, disconnect the crankcase vent hose by squeezing the release tabs (red arrows) and pulling the hose away from the cylinder head cover.
Figure 16

Working at the left front corner of the cylinder head cover, disconnect the crankcase vent hose by squeezing the release tabs (red arrows) and pulling the hose away from the cylinder head cover.

Working at the intake air duct, squeeze the release collar (green arrows) and pull the hose connection off the duct in the direction of the yellow arrow.
Figure 17

Working at the intake air duct, squeeze the release collar (green arrows) and pull the hose connection off the duct in the direction of the yellow arrow. 

Next, remove the intake air ducts from the throttle housing.
Figure 18

Next, remove the intake air ducts from the throttle housing. There are two hose clamps to loosen, one at the idle valve, the other at the throttle housing. Start at the idle valve. Loosen the 6mm hose clamp (green arrow).

Then, pull the idle air control motor boot (green arrow) off the idle control motor.
Figure 19

Then, pull the idle air control motor boot (green arrow) off the idle control motor.

Next, remove the intake air duct from the throttle housing.
Figure 20

Next, remove the intake air duct from the throttle housing. Loosen the 6mm hose clamp (green arrow).

Then, pull the intake air duct off the throttle housing and remove it from the engine.
Figure 21

Then, pull the intake air duct off the throttle housing and remove it from the engine.

Working next to the throttle housing, remove the three 10mm nuts and bolt from the wiring harness junction.
Figure 22

Working next to the throttle housing, remove the three 10mm nuts and bolt from the wiring harness junction. The green arrow points to the hidden nut that the ratchet is on in the photo. The yellow arrow points to the other two. The inset photo shows one out of sight on the bottom left.

Follow the engine oil dipstick tube down toward the engine mount.
Figure 23

Follow the engine oil dipstick tube down toward the engine mount. Remove the dipstick tube using a 13mm fastener (red arrow). Then rotate the dipstick tube away from the throttle housing. Next, disconnect the idle air valve electrical connector (yellow arrow). Then disconnect the throttle housing electrical connector by pressing the release tab (blue arrow) and pulling it off the housing. Remove the throttle housing wiring from the holder (green arrow) and move it aside. Pull the wiring harness junction from your intake manifold and lay it aside. Remove the idle air valve T40 Torx fasteners (purple arrows).

Then pull the idle valve out of the intake manifold and remove it.
Figure 24

Then pull the idle valve out of the intake manifold and remove it. Depending on how long the valve has been in the vehicle, it may be stuck to the rubber hose it mounts in. If this is the case, gently work the valve side to side as you pull it out.

Remove the four 10mm throttle-housing fasteners (green arrows).
Figure 25

Remove the four 10mm throttle-housing fasteners (green arrows).

Then, remove the throttle housing from your engine.
Figure 26

Then, remove the throttle housing from your engine. When reinstalling the throttle housing, use the following notes: Remember to replace the throttle housing sealing O-ring (green arrow). For the throttle housing adaptation MS 43: Turn the ignition key to the ON position for 10 seconds, (do not start engine). Next turn the ignition key to the OFF position for 10 seconds. Start the engine.

Working at the brake booster, remove the brake booster vacuum hose (red arrow) by pulling it straight out of the brake booster.
Figure 27

Working at the brake booster, remove the brake booster vacuum hose (red arrow) by pulling it straight out of the brake booster.

Working below the intake near the throttle housing mounting surface (purple arrow), locate the intake manifold mounting bracket.
Figure 28

Working below the intake near the throttle housing mounting surface (purple arrow), locate the intake manifold mounting bracket. Then remove the 16mm nut from the mounting bracket (green arrow).

Working at the front of the intake manifold, pull the evaporative emission purge solenoid off the mounting bracket.
Figure 29

Working at the front of the intake manifold, pull the evaporative emission purge solenoid off the mounting bracket. It is mounted in a rubber bushing and pulls straight off the bracket (purple arrow). Disconnect the electrical connector by squeezing the release tab and pulling it off.

Then disconnect the canister connection hose by squeezing the release tab and pulling it off the solenoid (green arrow).
Figure 30

Then disconnect the canister connection hose by squeezing the release tab and pulling it off the solenoid (green arrow).

Working at the rear of the intake manifold, disconnect the solenoid electrical connector by squeezing the release tab and pulling it off (green arrow).
Figure 31

Working at the rear of the intake manifold, disconnect the solenoid electrical connector by squeezing the release tab and pulling it off (green arrow). Then, reach between the firewall and intake manifold to disconnect the vacuum line at the solenoid.

Remove the nine 11mm intake manifold nuts (green arrows).
Figure 32

Remove the nine 11mm intake manifold nuts (green arrows). Once the fasteners have been removed, lift the intake manifold up and off the cylinder head. Cut the wire ties securing the wiring harness to the intake manifold. Continue to lift the intake manifold off the cylinder head, disconnecting hoses or electrical connectors. Then remove the intake manifold from the engine. Once removed, seal the intake ports to prevent debris from entering the cylinder head.

Before installing, replace the intake manifold gaskets.
Figure 33

Before installing, replace the intake manifold gaskets. Remove the gaskets by prying the gaskets out with a small flathead screwdriver. Install the new gaskets by pressing them in. Check that all gaskets are properly seated before installing the intake manifold. If you plan to replace your crankcase breather valve now is a good time. You have great access to it, and you can easily connect the hoses. See our tech article on crankcase breather valve replacing. Remove items you used to seal the intake ports on the cylinder head. Then install the intake manifold to the cylinder head and tighten the fasteners in an alternating pattern. Reconnect the knock sensor electrical connectors and then reconnect the fuel lines. Reinstall the evaporative emission purge valve. Reconnect the fuel injectors and intake air temperature sensor. Reinstall the remaining items in the reverse order of removal. Double check the wiring harness routing and fuel line connections. Once complete, let the engine idle for about 10 minutes. If you left something disconnected or an item is misrouted, it is best to find out before driving the car.

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Comments and Suggestions:
spinyard Comments: man what a great tutorial, helped me out big time to fix a vacuum leak under the manifold. My car was slightly different didn't have the vacuum line at the rear of the manifold or electrical connector.
March 5, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thanks for the additional info and feedback. We appreciate it.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 

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Page last updated: Fri 12/9/2016 02:42:48 AM