Parts Catalog Accessories Catalog Tech Info Tech Forums
 
Follow Pelican Parts on Facebook Follow Pelican Parts on Twitter Follow Pelican Parts on Instagram Follow Pelican Parts on YouTube Follow Pelican Parts on Pinterest Follow Pelican Parts on Tumblr
  Search our site:    
View Recent Cars  |   Cart  | Project List | Order Status | Help    
 >  >
N62 8 Cylinder Valvetronic Motor and Seal Replacement
 
Bookmark and Share

Pelican Technical Article:

N62 8 Cylinder Valvetronic Motor and Seal Replacement

Nick Czerula

Time:

3 hours3 hrs

Tab:

$200

Talent:

****

Tools:

4mm Allen bit, T25 Torx bit, flathead screwdriver

Applicable Models:

BMW 545i Sedan (2004-05)
BMW 550i Sedan (2006-10)

Parts Required:

Valvetronic motor seal, Valvetronic motor

Hot Tip:

Work with a cool engine

Performance Gain:

Removal for access to other components and remedy oil leaks

Complementary Modification:

Replace both banks at same time

The naturally aspirated engines used in BMW E60 cars are equipped with a system in which the conventional throttle is no longer used to control engine airflow. Instead, Valvetronic technology uses an electromechanical system to control intake valve lift. A Valvetronic stepper motor, bolted to the top of the valve cover, controls a secondary shaft underneath the valve cover. The secondary shaft is manufactured with eccentrics, which actuate rocker arms to control the degree of intake valve lift. At idle and during low throttle operation, minimal valve lift is required. As power demand on the engine increases, the engine control module (ECM) signals the Valvetronic motor to increase valve lift, thus opening the "throttle". In this system, the conventional throttle itself is kept open at all times while the engine is running except in case of an emergency in which case the throttle butterfly is used as a failsafe.

The advantages of the Valvetronic system include:

  •  Free breathing engine with lower emissions
  •  Improved performance with smoother and more immediate power
  •  Lower fuel consumption
  •  Improved cold start and cold running

The Valvetronic motor used in BMW E60 models with an 8-cylinder (N62 or N62 TU) engine is pretty reliable and does not fail too often. However, you will have to remove it for other engine repairs. The gasket that seals the mounting surface of the Valvetronic motor fails and leaks oil. When repairs are performed on the Valvetronic assembly, the limit stops have to be relearned. You will need access to a BMW scan tool to do this procedure. The limit stops are the mechanical limit stop, end to end of rotation of the eccentric shaft. The DME (digital motor electronics) records these stops via the eccentric shaft sensor to determine mechanical adjustment limits of the eccentric shaft. With that said, when removing the motor to replace the gasket you are not changing the mechanical position of any Valvetronic assembly components. A relearn is not always needed. Use this with caution and when in doubt, perform the relearn. Do your research and check with up-to-date repair information before beginning.

In this article, I'll go over the steps involved with replacing the Valvetronic motor and Valvetronic motor gasket on BMW E60 models with an 8-cylinder engine. Be sure to work with a cool engine.

Keep in mind that when your car was serviced before, parts may have been replaced with different size fasteners used in the replacement. The sizes of the nuts and bolts we give may be different from what you have, so be prepared with different size sockets and wrenches.

Protect your eyes, hands and body from fluids, dust and debris while working on your vehicle. If you're working with the electrical system, disconnect the battery before beginning. Always catch fluids in appropriate containers and properly dispose of any fluid waste. Recycle parts, packaging and fluids when possible. Do not work on your vehicle if you feel the task is beyond your ability.

Vehicle models change and evolve as they grow older, so the vehicle shown in our illustrations may vary slightly from yours. If something seems different, let us know and share your info to help other users. Do you have questions or want to add to the article? Leave a comment below. When leaving a comment, please leave your vehicle information.

Remove the engine covers. See our tech article on engine cover removing.

Disconnect the negative battery cable. See our tech article on battery replacing notes.

CLICK HERE FOR PARTS:

With the engine covers removed, both Valvetronic motors are visible (green arrows).
Figure 1

With the engine covers removed, both Valvetronic motors are visible (green arrows).

This photo shows oil residue (green arrow) and a fresh oil leak (yellow arrow) at the front of the Valvetronic motor.
Figure 2

This photo shows oil residue (green arrow) and a fresh oil leak (yellow arrow) at the front of the Valvetronic motor. If you have this issue, you can use this tech article to replace your Valvetronic motor seal.

Disconnect the Valvetronic motor electrical connector by squeezing the tabs and pulling the connector off the motor.
Figure 3

Disconnect the Valvetronic motor electrical connector by squeezing the tabs and pulling the connector off the motor.

This photo shows the right side Valvetronic motor with the electrical connector disconnected.
Figure 4

This photo shows the right side Valvetronic motor with the electrical connector disconnected. Before removing, you will have to back the motor out of the drive by rotating a 4mm bolt in the center of the motor. If the center of your motor is sealed (yellow arrow) like our subject vehicle, this is normal. The seal has to be broken away. Once you back the motor drive out, you will have to remove four, 4mm Allen fasteners (green arrows). Start by removing all but one of the Allen fasteners. Leave one finger tight for now.

Using a pick, break the seal out of the center of the Valvetronic motor until you can access the 4mm Allen fastener (green arrow).
Figure 5

Using a pick, break the seal out of the center of the Valvetronic motor until you can access the 4mm Allen fastener (green arrow).

Remove the final 4mm Allen fastener.
Figure 6

Remove the final 4mm Allen fastener. Hold the Valvetronic motor in place. Do not allow it to jump out. Using a 4mm Allen, rotate the Valvetronic motor counterclockwise manually. Rotate the motor slowly and guide it out of the cylinder head. Store the Valvetronic motor in a safe place.

With the Valvetronic motor removed, you can see one of the sealing O-rings still attached to the motor (green arrow).
Figure 7

With the Valvetronic motor removed, you can see one of the sealing O-rings still attached to the motor (green arrow).

To replace the Valvetronic motor pedestal seal, remove the four T25 Torx fasteners (green arrows).
Figure 8

To replace the Valvetronic motor pedestal seal, remove the four T25 Torx fasteners (green arrows).

Then lift the Valvetronic motor pedestal out of the valve cover in the direction of the green arrow.
Figure 9

Then lift the Valvetronic motor pedestal out of the valve cover in the direction of the green arrow.

Using a flathead screwdriver, gently lever the gasket out of the valve cover.
Figure 10

Using a flathead screwdriver, gently lever the gasket out of the valve cover. You will not need a lot of force to do this. The gasket should pop right out. Once the gasket is free from the valve cover, remove it and discard it.

Then press a new seal into the valve cover until it is fully seated.
Figure 11

Then press a new seal into the valve cover until it is fully seated. Lubricate the seal with clean engine oil, then install the Valvetronic motor pedestal and tighten the fasteners. Install the Valvetronic motor in the reverse order of removing it. Use a 4mm Allen bit to rotate the motor clockwise while installing it into the cylinder head. Once flush with the cylinder head, install the fasteners and tighten. Remember, if you removed aluminum fasteners, replace them each time they are removed. Be sure the wiring harness is routed as it was before and the engine covers are properly aligned. Turn the key to the ON position for 30 seconds, then OFF, then ON again for 30 seconds before starting the vehicle.

When repairs are performed on the Valvetronic assembly, the limit stops have to be relearned.
Figure 12

When repairs are performed on the Valvetronic assembly, the limit stops have to be relearned. You will need access to a BMW scan tool to do this procedure. The limit stops are the mechanical limit stop, end to end of the rotation of the eccentric shaft. The DME (digital motor electronics) records these stops via the eccentric shaft sensor to determine mechanical adjustment limits of the eccentric shaft. With that said, when removing the motor to replace the gasket you are not changing the mechanical position of any Valvetronic assembly components, so a relearn is not always needed. Now use this with caution and when in doubt, perform the relearn. Do your research and check with up-to-date repair information before beginning.

Bookmark and Share
Comments and Suggestions:
SA Comments: With the valve cover off, I locate shaft on which in the center has half circle with threads on it on which motor travels. Looking from this center either left or right I see no damage at all. I see two springs, one on each side equally spaced from the center. I have attached an image. Wonder if you can point where this stop is. Thanks.

if I look for the smaller camshaft run by the valvetronic motor, I don't see anything broken or damaged. There is a round nub close to the shaft on which are threads on which motor travels. I believe you meant this knob.
November 23, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: On the end of the shaft, not at the gear. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
SA Comments: If I can see and recognize eccentric shaft stop have no damage and both of my valvetronics are at the maximum extension position, at least it seems like due to size, how would I handle reinstalling these valvetronics valves? Thank you again.
November 23, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: With an advanced BMW scan tool. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
SA Comments: This may be stupid question! I can't recognize what exactly is the eccentric shaft stop. Is there a way you have an example or image to share.
November 23, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: With the valve cover off, look for the smaller camshaft run by the valvetronic motor. On the end of the shaft, there should be what looks like a nub or lever. this will be the stop. I do not have a photo to share. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
SA Comments: My additional question! If for some reason I don't see any issues now, when I reassemble everything and run re-learn procedure, if cars works the same as before that would me no damage has occurred? Thanks.
November 22, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Yes, if you reassemble and perform relearn and all is ok, all is ok. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
SA Comments: Thank for your reply. How would I know if they slammed to the limit stop? How can I find out? I did open valve cover to replace its gasket. I don't see any damage. Is is it possible to see it if I was holding it from jumping out and it clicked? Thanks.
November 22, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Remove the valve cover and inspect the eccentric shaft stops for damage. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
SA Comments: Hi, I removed both valveservos without loosing 4mm allen bolt on one side accidentally not knowing. The other side I also did not remove allen bolt but I did hold it from jumping out and simply unscrewed valvesero. Could this possible cause damage to shafts?
November 21, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: if they slammed to the limit stop, yes. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Eric Comments: I replaced the valve cover on bank 2 and now have a P0393 code. I switchedexhaust cam sensor with bank 1 but still a P0393. I traced the wiring back to the connection points and everything looks fine. With car on I get a goodground signal and the other two pins measure 12 volts. Strange thing is that with the car off, pin 3 give 900 ohm resistance using positive meter lead but reads open using the negative lead. I checked bank 1 and measure 400 ohms both ways. I pulled all cam actuator solonoids and they seem to work fine. When I pulled the valvetronic motor and reinstalled, I didn't need to use the hidden center screw. It seemed to go back in fine. I tried a new battery and alternator is rebuilt. Any ideas?
November 10, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: I don't have resistance specs, so I can't confirm your tests.

Possible the valvetronic motor isn't seated or needs to be adapted. - Nick at Pelican Parts
 
BinMO Comments: One more thing..

I have a strange "ticking" from the front of this side of the engine now. Would a faulty injector cause these issues without throwing a lean/rich/fuel issue code?

October 8, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Not likely. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
BinMO Comments: He didn't give the exact codes, but the O'Reilly guy said I am getting camshaft position sensor errors on but on bank 2 the side I worked on. It is also throwing a p115a which I can't find ANYTHING about. I know the cps aren't switched. Trying to fix this, I have cleaned and swapped the vanos solenoids, but that did not change anything. I also tried to reinstall the valvetronic, following the instructions listed above. Still nothing has changed. when it starts the hesitation I sometimes get the engine failsafe mode warning, but turning the truck off, then starting it back up, that "goes away".

I'm at a total loss as to what is going on
October 8, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: P115A is mass or volume air flow "A" Exceeded.

If an adaptation doesn't fix this fault, you have either an air leak or an engine wear issue, low vacuum. I have seen this code set due to intake pressure not as expected.- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
BinMO Comments: 05 x5 4.4 vvt motor jumped out. when reinstalling it, I was able to spin the whole motor, and the shaft screwed back into the gear. spun it all the way back down until it met the pedestal. starts, idles great, revs up to 6k, no problem, but sputters under load acceleration unless I feather the gas pedal. Was not an issue before. Is this possibly the shaft not screwed in far enough?
October 2, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Not likely, maybe ad adaptation issue. I would assume it is a misfire. Are there any fault codes? - Nick at Pelican Parts  
NL Comments: hi there,i have a problem with valvetronic motor on 2004 750li bimmer,it all begun after repairing the alternator which got damaged due to oil leak coming from tappet cover seals.after all was done putting back the valvetronic motor has produced engine rough running,engine check light,stalling at some point.I used launch to diagnose the problem and retrieved code 2A6C.Please help
September 26, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Start by confirming the valvetronic motor seals are properly seated. Then try to perform a valvetronic limit adaptation. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
alex Comments: Where can i find info on how to do the relearn procedure. Also I just rotated the body of the motor to screw the shaft into place until the motor was seated. the shaft stopped and the whole motor body was just spinning around the shaft. I did not break the plastic seal on the motor to access the allen screw. Is this OK it did not seam necessary? i dont want to break any seals which i can not replace without showing signs of tampering. At the factory this motor was placed with the seal so there must be a way for me to do it. no?
July 29, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: The relearn procedure is perform using an advanced BMW scan tool, in the drive menu under system tests / functions. No instructions are available as they are integrated in the tool. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Jason Comments: I had a valvetronic motor jump out while reversing the 4mm Allen on a early v8 ! Is there a possibility of valve damage when this occurs ? I did screw it back in but when starting the car it runs very rough ! Like a dead miss ! Thanks for taking my question !
June 6, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: If the eccentric shaft hits too hard, it can be damaged. Remove the valve cover and inspect the shaft stops. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
ZF Comments: The 4mm allen hidden in the center of the motor, does that rotate the shaft? Or is to rotate the entire motor body? I am trying to understand figure 6 and why I wouldn't be able to just rotate the whole motor body with my hands instead of a wrench.
March 26, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: It rotates the shaft. Rotating the shaft with a tool slowly unscrews it from the gear. If released too quickly damage can occur. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
aceman Comments: You say that you may have to reset the limit stop with a BMW scan tool. Where on earth can I rent a BMW scan tool? The dealer or an independant is not going to lend you one and no autoparts store will have one. So what am I to do? And, how do you know if you need to do it? If the stops are off, how would you even know?
March 24, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: You know via a fault code or possible rough running. The information here is provided as a service and most times these repairs are requested by users. If special tools or scan tools are needed, we do our best to note the items. You can, perform the repair yourself, then take the vehicle to a shop and have them set the limits using a BMW scan tool. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
JF Comments: i get P0020 code after i removed it it jumped out and just came out, do i have to do the relearn program i got Rheingold can i do it with that...
November 27, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Removed and jumped what? - Nick at Pelican Parts  
ron2n Comments: Hi guys, i have a problem. During removal of 4 allen bolts vvt motor jumped out. What should i do now, please help. What can a consequence of that? Can i rewind it using allen and then put it back?
regards
August 28, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Yes, wind it back in, - Nick at Pelican Parts  

  Search our site:    

View Cart & CheckOut | Project List | Order Status |  Help    

 

[Home] [Customer Service] [Shopping Cart] [Privacy Statement]
 [Contact Us] [About Us] [Shipping] [Map to our Location] [Careers]

Copyright © Pelican Parts Inc.

Page last updated: Wed 12/7/2016 02:23:43 AM