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Replacing A4 Engine Mounts
 
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Pelican Technical Article:

Replacing A4 Engine Mounts

Peter Bodensteiner

Time:

4 hours4 hrs

Tab:

$100 to $300

Talent:

***

Tools:

Lift or jack and jack stands, metric wrenches and sockets and ratchet handle, torque wrench, penetrating lubricant, utility knife

Applicable Models:

Audi A4 (1997-01)
Audi A4 Quattro (1997-01)

Parts Required:

New mounts

Hot Tip:

It's easy to substitute OEM S4 or RS4 mounts--but you may need to have the turbocharger out to gain access to the right-side mount.

Performance Gain:

Firm up the connection between your engine and chassis.

Complementary Modification:

Transmission mount replacement or upgrade

Look under the hood of an old Ford hot rod and its engine mounts will likely be simple metal brackets bolted to the car's chassis; in mass-produced passenger cars like your A4, engine mounts serve a dual purpose of connecting the engine to the chassis and keeping the engine's vibrations from being transmitted to the passengers. Usually this is achieved by incorporating rubber into the mounts.

Like any other rubber parts on a car, the rubber used in engine mounts can wear out over time. A cracked, torn, or deteriorated engine mount will do a poor job of isolating engine vibrations, or you will notice disconcerting clunks as the engine moves around as it runs.

For performance or track-day enthusiasts, the stock engine mounts may be a bit too flexible whether they are worn out or not. If you are one of these people, you may want to consider getting mounts from an S4 or RS4. Stiffer mounts do make for a less luxurious driving experience, but they do resist the twisting of the engine more than softer mounts, ensuring a more direct transmission of power from the engine to the drivetrain.

The A4 engines use three mounts. The two side mounts are large, rubber and metal parts that use a single, central bolt to connect the engine to the chassis. The third mount is a rubber bumper that attaches to a boss on the bottom of the radiator support panel. This "snout mount" rests in a metal "cup" that is attached to the engine just below the crankshaft pulley. Thus, you have to move the radiator support panel forward into the service position (see the service position article for additional help) to remove and replace this mount.

Let's start at the front mount, which is really more of a bumper than a proper mount.
Figure 1

Let's start at the front mount, which is really more of a bumper than a proper mount. It consists of the circled rubber piece, which is clearly visible from above when the radiator support panel is in the service position--you'll need to move the panel to this position to replace this mount.

You'll do your work from below the car, where the front mount is more visible.
Figure 2

You'll do your work from below the car, where the front mount is more visible. Here you can see the aluminum cup-shaped bracket where the rubber piece inserts when the radiator support panel is moved back into its normal position. Note the red arrow, which indicates the left, or driver's-side engine mount.

I found it easiest to cut the rubber mount in order to remove it from its protrusion on the radiator support panel.
Figure 3

I found it easiest to cut the rubber mount in order to remove it from its protrusion on the radiator support panel. I used a utility knife first and then a screwdriver to pry it off. However, this ended up scratching the paint a bit, so I'd advise using a more careful hand or a duller tool.

Put some lubricant on the inside of the new mount and slide it into place.
Figure 4

Put some lubricant on the inside of the new mount and slide it into place. I recommend a little common dish soap, do not use a petroleum or silicone based lubricant as it will harm the rubber. It is difficult to get enough leverage to push the rubber piece fully onto the protrusion. Try putting something between the end of the rubber mount and the engine; then you can push on the radiator support panel to force the mount into place.

Now move underneath the car to access the other two mounts.
Figure 5

Now move underneath the car to access the other two mounts. This is the left side mount--the red arrow points to the mount itself, while the aluminum piece below attaches to the front sub frame and also locates the front sway bar (it's been removed in this photo). Use a 13mm wrench or deep socket to remove the nut that is threaded onto the bottom of the mount.

This is the passenger-side, or right-side mount, seen from below.
Figure 6

This is the passenger-side, or right-side mount, seen from below. Just as with the mount on the other side, you'll need to remove the 13mm nut from the threads that extend from downward from the center of the mount (blue arrow). Note the three other holes in the aluminum brace to which the mount is attached. The red arrow points to a circular bump on the bottom of the mount that should up with this hole.

This photo shows the top of the right-side mount, with a socket and ratchet removing the 13mm nut at the top of the mount.
Figure 7

This photo shows the top of the right-side mount, with a socket and ratchet removing the 13mm nut at the top of the mount. You can see, however, how it could be very difficult if not impossible to access this nut without having first removed the airbox and the turbocharger. I even had to bend the heat shielding out of the way above the mounting nut. If the turbo is still in place you may be able to reach this nut from below, reaching forward from behind the nut, but access will be very limited. If you find yourself in this situation, you may be best served by lifting the engine. Having removed the bottom nuts, the mounts will lift up along with the engine and you may gain a little more room to work.

Here's the top of the right-side mount with the top nut removed.
Figure 8

Here's the top of the right-side mount with the top nut removed.

This is the left-, or driver's-side engine mount.
Figure 9

This is the left-, or driver's-side engine mount. It's easier to access, but harder to photograph. The red arrow points to the 13mm nut that secures the mount to the engine mount bracket that extends from the engine.

Figure 10

Remove the 13mm nut with a wrench or socket

Place a block of wood or some other protection between your floor jack and the engine oil pan before you raise the engine.
Figure 11

Place a block of wood or some other protection between your floor jack and the engine oil pan before you raise the engine. You only need to raise it up a few inches, just enough to give the mounts enough clearance to be removed.

This photo shows how much the engine was raised in order to remove the engine mounts.
Figure 12

This photo shows how much the engine was raised in order to remove the engine mounts. It doesn't look like much until you compare it to the last photo in this project, which shows the engine in its normal position. This lift was achieved without touching the transmission mounts at all.

When the engine is lifted, the bracket attached to the top of the mount lifts away from the mount itself.
Figure 13

When the engine is lifted, the bracket attached to the top of the mount lifts away from the mount itself. When it is lifted adequately, the mount can be removed.

Here's a good view of the left-side mount after its removal.
Figure 14

Here's a good view of the left-side mount after its removal. Note that the rubber portion is the top of the mount.

This photo is to the same as picture 13, except that it shows the right-side mount.
Figure 15

This photo is to the same as picture 13, except that it shows the right-side mount.

This mount looks different than the other one until.
Figure 16

This mount looks different than the other one until...

Voila! Because of its proximity to the turbocharger, which gets very hot, this mount is protected with a rubber cup that rests on the top of the mount.
Figure 17

Voila! Because of its proximity to the turbocharger, which gets very hot, this mount is protected with a rubber cup that rests on the top of the mount.

Because the holes in the mounting brackets are rather small, and the threaded portions of the mounts are long, it can be a bit tricky to reinstall the mounts.
Figure 18

Because the holes in the mounting brackets are rather small, and the threaded portions of the mounts are long, it can be a bit tricky to reinstall the mounts. Work slowly, raising and lowering the engine in small amounts.

Thread nuts onto the mounts as soon as you can, but don't tighten them down until you have all of the nuts on and have lowered the engine back down.
Figure 19

Thread nuts onto the mounts as soon as you can, but don't tighten them down until you have all of the nuts on and have lowered the engine back down. That will retain the flexibility of movement that you'll need to get all the holes and threads aligned. When you do get the nuts on, go ahead and lower the engine and tighten all four nuts down.

Again, contrast this photo with picture 12; here the engine has been lowered back onto its mounts.
Figure 20

Again, contrast this photo with picture 12; here the engine has been lowered back onto its mounts.

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Comments and Suggestions:
Chris Comments: I love your DIY's! What are the torque specs for the nuts on the left and right motor mounts? I think they're the 12mm or 13mm. Thanks!
November 15, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: I don’t have that info.


I would grab a repair manual. It will have the procedure, special tools and torque specs.


Give our parts specialists a call at 1-888-280-7799. - Nick at Pelican Parts
 
ProfileTrader Comments: Thanks for this hard to find good write-ups - Couple questions. I have a 1997 A4 B5 V6 FWD.
1. Instead of jacking up the engine can I just drop the Bracket that the mounts sits in and which the sway bar is attached? If I can remove the bracket is there any danger of engine dropping at all?
2.If not do I need to loosen/disconnect any hoses if engine is raised?
3.What are the bolt torque specs of the bracket bolts? Thank you.
September 15, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: The bracket won't out how you expect it. You'll have to raise the engine to get it out

The hoses should have enough travel to move up and down enough for servicing.

I don't have the torque info.- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
audisucker Comments: Before jacking up the engine did you have to disconnect or loosen any hoses?
August 16, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Only if removing the radiator support. Otherwise they connections should have enough movement. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
audisucker Comments: how about a link to the article about the radiator service position.
August 16, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Yes, I will have the article updated. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Tab Comments: Thank you this was very informative , finally someone talks about the elusive snub mount. Thanks again I understand much better.
June 22, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thanks for the feedback. Glad we could help.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 

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