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Transmission Mount Replacement
 
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Pelican Technical Article:

Transmission Mount Replacement

Peter Bodensteiner

Time:

2 hours2 hrs

Tab:

$75 to $150

Talent:

**

Tools:

8mm Allen socket, 15mm, 13mm sockets, ratchet, extension, torque wrench, L-shaped Allen wrench, penetrating lubricant

Applicable Models:

Audi A4 (1997-01)
Audi A4 Quattro (1997-01)

Parts Required:

New mounts

Hot Tip:

Choose appropriate mounts for OEM freshness, street performance, or racing

Performance Gain:

Even replacing worn-out stock mounts will make your shifts easier and more direct, and will improve drive train power delivery

Complementary Modification:

Engine mounts

For most of you, this project is simply a part of the larger job of removing the transmission. But for some, you simply need to remove your transmission mounts in order to replace old, worn-out mounts, or to upgrade to different mounts that, in most cases, provide a more rigid connection between the transmission and the body of the car.

When upgrading these mounts, the question becomes how far you want to go? Like engine mounts, equipping your car with firmer mounts will have two major effects. First, it will keep your transmission from moving around as much, which makes shifting more positive and helps the transmission more effectively transmit the engines torque to the rest of the drive train. On the other hand, it will most likely transmit more vibration to the body of the car, which can annoy you and your passenger to a degree that you don't want if you're talking about a street car. If you're going racing, such concerns aren't as important.

At the less-firm end are mounts like the standard rubber OEM mounts and OEM-plus upgrades, such as mounts from higher-performance models such as the S4 or RS-4. Above that are various aftermarket offerings that incorporate polyurethane and other, harder materials instead of rubber.

This is the right-side transmission mount, where it is connected to the car.
Figure 1

This is the right-side transmission mount, where it is connected to the car. The front axle (blue circle) runs just in front of the mount. The mount attaches to the front sub frame of the car through a metal bracket that is welded to the sub frame. Once you have the car in the air and supported on jack stands, remove these two bolts with a 13mm (17 ft-lbs).

This view is looking straight up at the whole transmission mount, with the front of the car toward the bottom of the photo.
Figure 2

This view is looking straight up at the whole transmission mount, with the front of the car toward the bottom of the photo. Again, you can see the front axle in this photo (blue arrow). The two bolts mentioned in <a href="#" style="color:000080" id='In_text_1' onClick="PopUpMessage('In_text_1','images_small/Pic02.jpg',0);return false;">Figure 1</a> have been removed (green circles). The thin aluminum heat shielding you see is also part of the transmission mount. The mount is attached not only to the transmission and the sub frame, but also to the exhaust down pipe (red arrow) with a strange bracket-and-spring apparatus (this apparatus connects to the down pipe in the orange box). The yellow circles indicate two of the three Allen-head bolts that attach the mount to the transmission. If you need more room to work, you can remove the cross-piece marked with the purple arrow without consequence.

It's difficult to photograph, but there is a bolt that passes through one of the metal brackets pictured, through the rubber donut that is attached to the transmission mount (red circle), through the other metal bracket, and then is secured with a nut.
Figure 3

It's difficult to photograph, but there is a bolt that passes through one of the metal brackets pictured, through the rubber donut that is attached to the transmission mount (red circle), through the other metal bracket, and then is secured with a nut. Technically you might be able to remove just this bolt and leave the lower bolt in place, where this mount attaches to the down pipe, but it will make it more difficult to remove the down pipe from the car if it is still attached to the catalytic converter (I removed the cat and down pipe by lifting it up and out of the engine bay, after removing the turbocharger). Nevertheless, you do need to remove the 8mm Allen-head bolts that hold the mount to the transmission. The lower rear bolt is being removed here.

Here's the lower front 8mm Allen bolt (30 ft-lbs).
Figure 4

Here's the lower front 8mm Allen bolt (30 ft-lbs). It's clear to see how close the mount is to the front axle.

Here I'm removing the 13mm bolt that holds the transmission mount-mounting bracket to the down pipe.
Figure 5

Here I'm removing the 13mm bolt that holds the transmission mount-mounting bracket to the down pipe. It's not necessary if you're only removing the mount. However, this photo gives you an idea of how the exhaust system crowds the space above the transmission mount.

The top Allen bolt is the last fastener attaching the mount to the transmission.
Figure 6

The top Allen bolt is the last fastener attaching the mount to the transmission. Obviously the exhaust is out of the way here, which makes it much easier to see this top bolt.

It takes a little experimentation, but eventually you'll be able to maneuver the right-side transmission mount out of the car.
Figure 7

It takes a little experimentation, but eventually you'll be able to maneuver the right-side transmission mount out of the car. Installation is the reverse of removal

On to the left side of the car.
Figure 8

On to the left side of the car. This mount is more straight forward, if slightly different in configuration to the other mount. This one attaches to the car with a 15mm bolt (and locating pin, red arrow). Four Allen-head bolts attach the mount to the transmission this time, but they're the same size as before. Note that the axle is detached here, but that is not necessary to remove the mount.

If you were just removing the mount in order to remove the transmission, you could unbolt the aluminum bracket from the rubber mount by removing this Allen bolt (red arrow).
Figure 9

If you were just removing the mount in order to remove the transmission, you could unbolt the aluminum bracket from the rubber mount by removing this Allen bolt (red arrow). Mine stripped out when I tried to remove this bolt, so be cautious.

Once all the bolts are removed you can rotate the mount vertically to remove it from the car.
Figure 10

Once all the bolts are removed you can rotate the mount vertically to remove it from the car.

This close-up view of the left-side mount shows that the rubber inside it is in good shape.
Figure 11

This close-up view of the left-side mount shows that the rubber inside it is in good shape. Obviously if yours is visibly torn you'd want to replace it. Higher-performance mounts use harder rubber, polyurethane, or even solid metal here, all of which transmit more vibration to the passengers, as you would expect. Installation is the reverse of removal





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