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VW / Audi Turbocharger Rebuild
 
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Pelican Technical Article:

VW / Audi Turbocharger Rebuild

Peter Bodensteiner

Time:

3-4 hours

Tab:

$100 to $300

Talent:

*****

Tools:

8mm and 10mm wrenches and sockets, punch, hammer, rubber mallet, two-jaw puller, bench vise, Phillips screwdriver, flat-blade screwdriver, circlip pliers, inch-pound torque wrench, carb cleaner and other solvents, brushes, rags, rubber gloves, propane torch, engine assembly lubricant, protective eyeglasses

Applicable Models:

 
Audi A4 (1997-01)
Audi A4 Quattro (1997-01)
Audi TT (2000-04)
Audi TT Quattro (2000-04)
VW Beetle (1999-02)
VW Golf (2000-02)
VW Jetta (2000-02)
VW Passat (1996-00)

Parts Required:

actuator, gaskets and new bolts and studs for reinstallation

Hot Tip:

Take photos as you go and keep loose parts in baggies to help identify and replace parts during the rebuild process

Performance Gain:

If you're rebuilding a malfunctioning stock turbo, you'll regain your stock performance

Complementary Modification:

Exhaust manifold replacement or gasket replacement, O2 sensor replacement, air filter replacement, oil change

If your turbocharger isn't working, you're just left with a naturally aspirated engine saddled with an exhaust restriction. As such, a dramatic loss of power is one way to tell if your turbo is on its way out. You can confirm this by measuring boost under full throttle (and under load Â"not revving in neutral).

If you're not getting over 10 lbs of boost from a K03 or K04 turbo in your 1.8T, there's a problem. Bear in mind that it could be a leak in your intake plumbing or a plugged up catalytic converter rather than a bad turbo. Other signs of a turbo problem are excessive smoking from the exhaust, specifically oil burning Â"which would indicate a bad seal in the turbo. You can also diagnose a turbo in need of a rebuild by measuring endplay or up-and-down movement in the shaft that connects the compressor and turbine wheels through the center of the turbo. The best way to measure this is with a dial indicator, as the amount of movement you'll see is quite small.

Many people may look at a blown stock turbo as simply an opportunity to upgrade to a more powerful unit. However, it's not a bad idea to tear your old turbo down to see what caused it to fail. If it's a problem with the oiling or cooling system, it's possible this problem will take out your fancy new turbo too. And, of course, there are many folks who simply want to repair their car and restore stock performance without forking over more than $1,000 to a dealership for a replacement unit. Either way, this project will show you how to dig into a turbocharger. My best advice is to go slowly and take pictures and notes along the way so that you can put all those strange and unusual parts back together at the end.

Here's the starting point for your rebuild.
Figure 1

Here's the starting point for your rebuild. Roughly speaking, this is what any turbo will look like before you rebuild it. Of course, if you're not rebuilding a K03 or K04 turbo, you should probably take your own photographs at this stage rather than relying on this one. Your photos will help you get the turbo "clocked" correctly, Â"meaning how the turbine, center, and compressor sections are oriented--when you put it back together at the end of the rebuild.

This is the compressor side of the turbo, also known as the
Figure 2

This is the compressor side of the turbo, also known as the "cold" side. Note the ID tag (green arrow). This will give you information that can be used to source the correct replacement and rebuild parts for your turbo. I found that the blue paint on the tag didn't hold up to the carb cleaner I used to clean the turbo parts, but the ID numbers are etched onto the tag and did were not affected.

Before you start disassembly, mark the three sections of the turbocharger in a line; when you reassemble the turbo, you will line up the marks to re-orient everything correctly.
Figure 3

Before you start disassembly, mark the three sections of the turbocharger in a line; when you reassemble the turbo, you will line up the marks to re-orient everything correctly. I used a punch to mark the compressor side in line with the oil line inlet on the top of the center section of the turbo. I marked the exhaust side with a permanent marker, as the exhaust housing won't see any solvent that would remove the mark.

First step is to remove the wastegate actuator.
Figure 4

First step is to remove the wastegate actuator. Loosen the 10mm nut that secures the wastegate actuator rod to the lever arm that moves the wastegate inside the turbine housing.

Leave the remaining nut in place on the actuator rod.
Figure 5

Leave the remaining nut in place on the actuator rod. This will ensure that you can replace the rod in the same position later.

Two 10mm bolts hold the wastegate actuator bracket to the compressor housing (green arrows).
Figure 6

Two 10mm bolts hold the wastegate actuator bracket to the compressor housing (green arrows). Remove these bolts and then remove the wastegate actuator.

The wastegate actuator and bracket are off.
Figure 7

The wastegate actuator and bracket are off. The rebuild kit should have replacements for the mounting bolts.

Six 10mm bolts hold the turbine section to the center section of the turbo.
Figure 8

Six 10mm bolts hold the turbine section to the center section of the turbo. Some of these bolts are easy to reach, and some are not. In addition, some of the bolts basically have to be removed as you separate the two sections from each other because access to them is limited. This picture shows three of the six bolts on one side of the turbo housing (green arrows).

Because these bolts push against the center section of the turbo as you back them out, you can use this action to help separate the two sections from each other.
Figure 9

Because these bolts push against the center section of the turbo as you back them out, you can use this action to help separate the two sections from each other.

As you loosen the bolts, you can rotate the triangular tabs out of the way and lift the center section out of the turbine housing.
Figure 10

As you loosen the bolts, you can rotate the triangular tabs out of the way and lift the center section out of the turbine housing. These six bolts will be replaced.

The next step is to separate the compressor housing from the center section.
Figure 11

The next step is to separate the compressor housing from the center section. Opposite the two bolts that secured the wastegate are two more 10mm bolts that you must remove. These two bolts hold a semicircular brace between them that overlaps the seam between the center bearing section and the compressor housing. These two bolts, like the two holding the wastegate in place, should be replaced (green arrows). Also note the mark made on the compressor housing to the center section (purple arrow). This will help you when you line the compressor housing back up.

Next, secure the whole assembly in a bench vise, using the end of the shaft beyond the exhaust turbine to hold the assembly.
Figure 12

Next, secure the whole assembly in a bench vise, using the end of the shaft beyond the exhaust turbine to hold the assembly. You need to protect the fins of the turbine. A paper towel isn't enough. Â"I ended up using a cotton towel between the vise jaws. You need to be careful not to put any sideways pressure on the assembly while it's in the vise.

Use a two-jaw puller to remove the compressor housing from the center section.
Figure 13

Use a two-jaw puller to remove the compressor housing from the center section.

Secure the jaws of the puller on the
Figure 14

Secure the jaws of the puller on the "ears" of the compressor housing through which the bolts pass. This will give the jaws enough purchase to separate the compressor housing without also pulling on the center section. There is some anaerobic sealer between the compressor housing and the center section, so you may need to apply some heat with a propane torch around the perimeter of the turbo assembly to soften up the sealer. You can rotate the assembly while it's in the vise in order to apply the heat all around the perimeter. In my case, the puller was sufficient to separate the two parts.

The threaded center portion of the two-jaw puller has a pointed end.
Figure 15

The threaded center portion of the two-jaw puller has a pointed end. I used a small socket to protect the end of the turbo's central shaft from damage.

The compressor housing lifts up and away.
Figure 16

The compressor housing lifts up and away.

The next step is to remove the compressor wheel.
Figure 17

The next step is to remove the compressor wheel. To eliminate the need to balance the turbo before reassembly, you need to mark the position of the turbine and compressor wheels in relation to each other. I used some white paint to do this (green arrows), but I found that the paint was removed by the solvents I used to clean the turbo components. I recommend you make two very small scratches, one on each wheel, where they align with one another. You don't want to change the mass of either wheel in any way, as that would defeat the purpose and would make rebalancing necessary, not to mention that any damage to these high-RPM components could cause them to become unstable during operation.

Removing the 10mm nut on the end of the compressor wheel makes the disassembly of the center section possible.
Figure 18

Removing the 10mm nut on the end of the compressor wheel makes the disassembly of the center section possible. It may be reverse-threaded, so be careful as you twist it one way or the other, and if you feel resistance for more than a few degrees, try turning the nut the other way. If you twist too far in the wrong direction you will snap the central shaft that connects the two wheels, and this will cost upwards of $200 to replace and rebalance these componentsâÂÂÂÂ"and honestly, you can buy another used K03 turbo for that amount. Remember that the other end of the shaft is clamped in the vise, so don't apply any lateral pressure and risk bending the shaft.

You may need to heat the compressor wheel to remove it
Figure 19

You may need to heat the compressor wheel to remove it. The heat expands the wheel, increasing the clearance to the shaft and allowing it to slide off. If you need to apply heat, make sure to use leather gloves when you grab the compressor wheel to protect your hands. In my case I was able to pry the wheel loose pretty easily, without applying heat. Be careful in handling the compressor wheel to prevent nicking or bending its fins.

Once the compressor wheel is removed, you can remove the assembly from the vise.
Figure 20

Once the compressor wheel is removed, you can remove the assembly from the vise. This seal plate slides off next.

Inside the center of the plate is a small, plain bearing that should be removed.
Figure 21

Inside the center of the plate is a small, plain bearing that should be removed. You should have a replacement bearing in your rebuild kit.

You should be able to push the shaft, which is attached to the turbine wheel, out the other side of the center section.
Figure 22

You should be able to push the shaft, which is attached to the turbine wheel, out the other side of the center section. If necessary, a tap with a rubber mallet should help you push it out. Being the hot side of the turbo, oil has a tendency to collect and overheat in this area, also known as "coking." These carbon deposits should all be removed during the rebuild process. Some carbon flakes are evident on the workbench in this photo, and on the turbine shaft and the shield that sits below the turbine wheel.

Just below the turbine wheel is a C-clip that rests within a groove in the shaft.
Figure 23

Just below the turbine wheel is a C-clip that rests within a groove in the shaft. This clip can be removed with a small screwdriver. Make sure to wear some protective eyewear when working with these clips, as they can fly away in random trajectories as you pry on them.

Turning back to the compressor side of the turbo, you'll next remove several small parts, all of which will be replaced by parts from your rebuild kit.
Figure 24

Turning back to the compressor side of the turbo, you'll next remove several small parts, all of which will be replaced by parts from your rebuild kit. First is this thin plate (a.k.a., oil deflector), which simply lifts up and away.

Use a small screwdriver to lift up this thrust bearing and remove it.
Figure 25

Use a small screwdriver to lift up this thrust bearing and remove it.

Next, remove this small thrust washer from the very center.
Figure 26

Next, remove this small thrust washer from the very center.

There's a rubber O-ring around the perimeter of this central area of the turbo's center section.
Figure 27

There's a rubber O-ring around the perimeter of this central area of the turbo's center section. Simply slide a small screwdriver underneath the O-ring and gently pry it loose.

This small C-clip retaining ring is under some tension.
Figure 28

This small C-clip retaining ring is under some tension. Again with your small screwdriver, apply some pressure to it and/or try to get underneath it. The darker-colored metal beneath the clip is a part that you will replace, so feel free to use that as a surface upon which you can slide your screwdriver blade in order to get it underneath the clip.

With the C-clip out of the way, remove that thin, dark metal plate just underneath.
Figure 29

With the C-clip out of the way, remove that thin, dark metal plate just underneath.

All that's left on this side is the central journal bearing itself.
Figure 30

All that's left on this side is the central journal bearing itself. Place your screwdriver into the center, lever it against the inside of the bearing and lift it straight out.

Here's the whole central journal bearing.
Figure 31

Here's the whole central journal bearing. Remove it and add it to the collection of parts and pieces that you've removed.

Note the coking on the turbine end of the center section.
Figure 32

Note the coking on the turbine end of the center section. The last piece that needs to be removed is the circlip that sits in a groove inside the cylindrical passage in the center of the bearing housing.

Use a pair of circlip pliers to remove the circlip.
Figure 33

Use a pair of circlip pliers to remove the circlip. These pliers have points on the end that can be inserted into the holes at the end of the circlip. With the points inserted you can compress the clip with the pliers and then remove it.

Here's the circlip after it's been removed, and like the other components, it will be replaced with a new item.
Figure 34

Here's the circlip after it's been removed, and like the other components, it will be replaced with a new item. Inside the turbo center section, you can see the thin groove from which the circlip was extracted.

Now it's time to clean everything up.
Figure 35

Now it's time to clean everything up. I tried spraying some carb cleaner into an old pickle jar and letting some of the components soak in it. It was marginally successfulâÂÂÂÂ"it was hard to get enough cleaner out of the can to really soak things, but the lidded jar did keep the cleaner from evaporating.

Even after soaking in carb cleaner and some vigorous scrubbing, the tenacious carbon deposits wouldn't come off completely.
Figure 36

Even after soaking in carb cleaner and some vigorous scrubbing, the tenacious carbon deposits wouldn't come off completely. Looking through the central hole, note the open passage between central bearing hole and the hole for the oil drain. This passage must be free of any carbon deposits before you reassemble the turbo. This is critical!

A pocketknife blade was much more successful at removing carbon deposits from the turbo components.
Figure 37

A pocketknife blade was much more successful at removing carbon deposits from the turbo components. Light scraping pressure was all that was needed, and the carbon chipped off quickly and easily. Repeat this procedure for any carbon deposits on any other components.

The tip of the knife was helpful to remove carbon from this small groove in the turbine shaft, while the edge of the blade was used to scrape off the rest of the carbon deposits in this area.
Figure 38

The tip of the knife was helpful to remove carbon from this small groove in the turbine shaft, while the edge of the blade was used to scrape off the rest of the carbon deposits in this area.

After cleaning the components, I dunked them in some soapy water to remove any remaining residue from the carb cleaner.
Figure 39

After cleaning the components, I dunked them in some soapy water to remove any remaining residue from the carb cleaner.

I used a clean towel to dry the components and wipe off any residue.
Figure 40

I used a clean towel to dry the components and wipe off any residue.

A coat of WD-40 ensured that water was displaced from any nooks and crannies in the components.
Figure 41

A coat of WD-40 ensured that water was displaced from any nooks and crannies in the components. I used another towel to soak up any excess WD-40. On the center section, make sure to clean any debris from the central bearing passageâÂÂÂÂ"you don't want any dirt or grit in this area at all.

Minus the replacement parts from the rebuild kit, here are all the parts of the turbo, cleaned and ready for reassembly.
Figure 42

Minus the replacement parts from the rebuild kit, here are all the parts of the turbo, cleaned and ready for reassembly. The turbine housing and the wastegate actuator were the only components that didn't receive a full soaking in solvent and a rinseâÂÂÂÂ"they only needed superficial cleaning.

The first replacement part is the circlip that goes just inside the turbine end of the central passage.
Figure 43

The first replacement part is the circlip that goes just inside the turbine end of the central passage. Its home groove is the deepest ring you can see within the central passage in this photo. Use the circlip pliers to squeeze the circlip slightly so that you can position it properly. This circlip holds the central bearing in place on the turbine side of the center section of the turbo.

Use engine assembly lubricant on the rebuild parts as you reinstall them, particularly on anything that will experience any friction.
Figure 44

Use engine assembly lubricant on the rebuild parts as you reinstall them, particularly on anything that will experience any friction. This will ensure these parts have some lubrication before the engine oil reaches these components upon startup.

Insert the central bearing into the middle of the turbo center section.
Figure 45

Insert the central bearing into the middle of the turbo center section. The end of the bearing with a V-shaped groove should be facing toward you. With the turbine-side circlip in place, you can just drop it in and it won't come out the other side.

The V shape in this metal tab rests in the V-shaped groove of the bearing, holding it in the proper position so that the oil feed holes in the bearing are aligned properly.
Figure 46

The V shape in this metal tab rests in the V-shaped groove of the bearing, holding it in the proper position so that the oil feed holes in the bearing are aligned properly.

Inserting this C-clip is probably the hardest part of the reassembly.
Figure 47

Inserting this C-clip is probably the hardest part of the reassembly. Coax it into place with a small screwdriver.

Here the C-clip is in place.
Figure 48

Here the C-clip is in place. I placed the gap in the clip out of alignment with the oil passage shown here at the 7 o'clock position, but I'm not sure it mattersâÂÂÂÂ"that's just how the C-clip was oriented during disassembly.

Next, place the rubber O-ring around the center of the turbo.
Figure 49

Next, place the rubber O-ring around the center of the turbo. I put a little engine assembly lube on it.

Next is the small thrust washer.
Figure 50

Next is the small thrust washer. It simply sits in place within the inner circumference of the C-clip we just installed.

This gold-colored thrust bearing is next.
Figure 51

This gold-colored thrust bearing is next. Note how the large cutout in the washer aligns with the oil passage. It also holds the small silver bearing in place.

The largest downward-facing tab on this metal oil deflector clip goes into the oil passage and holds the gold-colored washer in the correct orientation, along with the other, smaller tabs.
Figure 52

The largest downward-facing tab on this metal oil deflector clip goes into the oil passage and holds the gold-colored washer in the correct orientation, along with the other, smaller tabs.

That's it for the rebuild components on the compressor side of the center section.
Figure 53

That's it for the rebuild components on the compressor side of the center section.

This C-clip goes into the groove closest to the turbine wheel.
Figure 54

This C-clip goes into the groove closest to the turbine wheel. Place it like so and then slide it down into the groove.

This oil shield goes into place on the exhaust side of the center section
Figure 55

This oil shield goes into place on the exhaust side of the center sectionâÂÂÂÂ

and then the turbine shaft can be inserted through the center of the turbo.
Figure 56

âÂÂÂÂand then the turbine shaft can be inserted through the center of the turbo. Be sure to apply some engine assembly lube to the turbine shaft beforehand.

Prepare the new bearing that goes into the center of the aluminum plate that seals off the compressor side.
Figure 57

Prepare the new bearing that goes into the center of the aluminum plate that seals off the compressor side. It has a new C-clip that should be installed into the groove as shown.

With the C-clip providing a touch of resistance, the bearing should snap into place in the center of the aluminum plate.
Figure 58

With the C-clip providing a touch of resistance, the bearing should snap into place in the center of the aluminum plate. This is another spot where a drop or two of assembly lube provides good insurance.

Slide the plate into place and then place the compressor wheel onto the shaft.
Figure 59

Slide the plate into place and then place the compressor wheel onto the shaft. If you had to heat up the compressor wheel to remove it from the shaft, you may need to heat it up again to put it back. This is where you want to make sure the two wheels are aligned as they were before if you want to avoid having to rebalance the assembly.

Before you tighten down the 10mm nut on the outside of the compressor wheel, make sure the turbine shaft is inserted fully into the turbo's center section.
Figure 60

Before you tighten down the 10mm nut on the outside of the compressor wheel, make sure the turbine shaft is inserted fully into the turbo's center section. At first the turbine wheel may stand about 1/8 inch proud of the oil shield, but if you have it inserted properly, it will look like this. You should be able to push the shaft into place by hand, but it will offer a few pounds of resistance before it snaps into place. Moving to the compressor wheel lock nut, lightly oil the threads of the shaft if you have reverse threads; apply medium-strength thread locker for standard threads. Hand-tighten the lock nut until it touches the thrust collar. Torque the nut to 28 in-lbs and then: turn an additional 1/8 turn for reverse threads; turn an additional 1/4 turn for standard threads. Please contact Audi for exact torque specs. 

The next step is to reattach the compressor housing to the turbo's center section.
Figure 61

The next step is to reattach the compressor housing to the turbo's center section. Orient the pieces roughly as shown, noting the location of the two-bolt brace, and insert the two replacement bolts (note that the rebuild kit bolts are equipped with threadlocker).

Put the two-bolt brace in place and then insert the bolts into the correct holes.
Figure 62

Put the two-bolt brace in place and then insert the bolts into the correct holes.

Don't tighten the bolts down all the way--you may have to reposition things slightly as you align all three major sections of the turbo at the end of the rebuild.
Figure 63

Don't tighten the bolts down all the way--you may have to reposition things slightly as you align all three major sections of the turbo at the end of the rebuild. Just tighten them down enough so that the center and compressor housing are not rotating against each other.

Place the six 10mm bolts into the compressor housing, orienting the triangle-shaped tabs as shown so that you can insert the turbine wheel into the hole.
Figure 64

Place the six 10mm bolts into the compressor housing, orienting the triangle-shaped tabs as shown so that you can insert the turbine wheel into the hole. Don't tighten them down all the way.

Here you can see my alignment marks for the three portions of the turbocharger assembly.
Figure 65

Here you can see my alignment marks for the three portions of the turbocharger assembly. The punch mark on the compressor housing (green arrow) and the Sharpie mark on the turbine (yellow arrow) housing seem to be aligned, but the oil feed hole is slightly out of line. Here I had to move the compressor housing slightly relative to the center section first and then align those two with the turbine housing.

Here the center section of the turbo is inserted into the turbine housing, but is not fully seated.
Figure 66

Here the center section of the turbo is inserted into the turbine housing, but is not fully seated. You want to have the bolts loose enough that you can lift the six metal tabs onto the flange of the center section and rotate them into place.

Push each tab clockwise onto the center section flange as far as it will go.
Figure 67

Push each tab clockwise onto the center section flange as far as it will go.

Once the tabs are in place, use your 10mm wrench to tighten the bolts down.
Figure 68

Once the tabs are in place, use your 10mm wrench to tighten the bolts down. This will pull the center section further into the turbine housing, seating it in place.

With the three major sections of the turbo back together, it's time to reinstall the wastegate actuator.
Figure 69

With the three major sections of the turbo back together, it's time to reinstall the wastegate actuator. Align the two holes in the mounting bracket with the two remaining holes in the compressor housing.

Insert the two new bolts from the rebuilt kit into and attach the wastegate actuator bracket.
Figure 70

Insert the two new bolts from the rebuilt kit into and attach the wastegate actuator bracket.

Insert the wastegate actuator rod into the hole in the arm that actually moves the wastegate within the turbine housing.
Figure 71

Insert the wastegate actuator rod into the hole in the arm that actually moves the wastegate within the turbine housing.

Press the end of the actuator arm (actually, the attachment at the end of the arm through which the actuator rod threads) against the nut on the actuator arm.
Figure 72

Press the end of the actuator arm (actually, the attachment at the end of the arm through which the actuator rod threads) against the nut on the actuator arm. You didn't move that nut since you disassembled everything, right? Then thread the nut onto the end of the actuator rod and tighten it down.

That's it
Figure 73

That's it, Â"your turbo is now rebuilt. It's and ready be installed and run for another 100,000 miles or so. Reverse the instructions in the Turbo Removal project to reinstall the turbo.

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Comments and Suggestions:
captain_video Comments: Great write-up and photos. I frequent the Passat World forums and these instructions are just what the folks there like to see as most of them are DIY mechanics. Do you mind if I post a link to this article in the forums?
May 16, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Of course not. Go ahead and share the links. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
zethe Comments: Thanks you so much, this was very helpful
April 12, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thanks for the feedback. Glad we could help.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
Hymans Comments: i have an Audi A4 1.8T 1997 model and has a problem its very slow and powerless wen accelerating i can hear rattle like sound from the engine sometimes and wont accelerate
March 24, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Check exhaust back-pressure, the cat may be faulty. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Newtoturbo Comments: What seals/gaskets do i need to replace the old turbo with used if any on 2001 vw golf1.8t
March 11, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff:
I’m not the best with part numbers.

Give our parts specialists a call at 1-888-280-7799. They can figure out what part or repair kit you need.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
Phumlani Comments: My 1.8t Audi A4 emits a lot of white smoke from the exhaust when I start the engine in the morning and disappears after a few minutes, what could be the cause
February 28, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: White smoke is likely coolant. I would pressure test the cooling system. If the system will not hold pressure and there are no external leaks the head gasket may be faulty.
if the cooling system hols pressure, the smoke may be normal condensation escaping the exhaust. - Nick at Pelican Parts
 
Matthew Comments: hello, I'm new to the turbo family and didn't know much about them until I picked up a 1997 audi a 4 1.8t the turbo was just replaced with a new unit, as I was informed by the seller, and at first I was concerned about the smoke and burning oil in the exhaust but eventually that cleared up and that was expected. The car has driven probably 400 miles and no longer smokes out the tailpipe, but now the car seems to accelerate faster but has a point where the engine hiccups or loss of all power happens just after entering 3rd or whenever a large wind up would be induced from the turbo. I deffinitely was loosing a little oil and found splatters under the car a few times before this happened when it seemed to drive fine with the exception of burning residue in the exhaust manifold. There is now the smell of what I believe to be coolant on the left side under hood approaching from the front of the car. There is a coolant leak I don't believe to be related to the issue, but I am not sure why the car looses power at 2,100 rpm respectively and I added oil to appropriate level and still having a problem. The whine of the turbo does seem higher pitched than it did before the issue and the car runs with a very light whistle. I have not driven the car much since this finding, only to next door where those speeds are not required. Thanks so much this is a very informative thread.
October 13, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Check the engine for external oil leaks to start. Also, locate the source of the coolant odor. Once you deal with the external leaks, you'll be bale to determine if the turbo is using oil. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
mlmS4 Comments: Comment on figure 8. I found that if you use a punch and a hammer on the tabs and tap counter clockwise on the tabs, these bolts are easy to remove. Otherwise, they tend to strip with just an open end wrench as they are torqued tightly.
August 29, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thanks for the additional info. We appreciate it.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
JoeBuddy Comments: Hi Pelican Staff, I have a 2000 Passat 145K miles and after reading your comments about of the turbo is bad than the car should be using oil excessively. mine doesn't use any more oil than maybe a half quart over three months. Problem is when I stomp on the gas and eng revs above 2000 rpms it immediately stalls. I've replace the intermodals, plugs and the gas pump any ideas???
August 14, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: When the vehicle stalls, you want to monitor the engine vitals to see what is going away, Fuel, spark, etc. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
sa3edooof Comments: Hi, Thank you for your great helpful information.
I removed my 1.8t engine to replace the cracked oil pan and to do some other modifications, then I replaced the engine again.my problem is when I started the engine about 15 min on idle the turbocharger overheated and became red and when I increased the rpm to 25-30 the display screen showed me "OIL PRESS STOP MOTOR" and the oil lamp light on. I don't no if there is a relation between the turbocharger and the oil pressure. please tell me where is the problem. very urgent!!
thank you again...
August 11, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Have you checked oil level and pressure? Sounds like an oil line is restricted. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Ben Comments: I've found numerous other sources quoting the Compressor Nut torque as 28 lbf-in plus 1/8 turn or 1/4 turn rather than 18 lbf-in.

Could you check this figure.

July 29, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Ben,

We suggest checking with factory repair information regarding the torque specification. I can't confirm either of those numbers.- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
gman Comments: I have a 2007 past 2.0t with fsi engine. Do you sell a rebuild kit for the turbo in this car?
June 29, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: I'm sure we can get one.

Give our parts specialists a call at 1-888-280-7799. They can figure out what part or repair kit you need.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
raah Comments: Hi i had a question about the turbine shaft nut.Is it normal to have a large notch on one side of the nut?
June 3, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Do you mean like in fig 11? Then, yes. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
sheila Comments: Nick, There's no smoke coming out of the exhaust. I have had to add 2 quarts over the last 2 1/2 months. Driving less than 2000 miles. There is nothing oil external.
April 1, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Then the issue may not be with the turbo. Usually leaking turbo cause smoke. Your engine may be burning oil - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Sheila Comments: I am burning about a quart of oi a month and it appears to be through turbo. Do I need to rebuild or replace turbo ? It is a 2004 Audi 1.8 Cabriolet.
March 29, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: In how many miles? Is the vehicle smoking? - Nick at Pelican Parts  
vag Comments: thanks for this the torque settings were so helpful
March 13, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thanks for the feedback. Glad we could help.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
Anton Comments: Using this article I successfully rebuilt my turbo for my 2002 A4. I don't see it listed but is there any reason this would not apply to the K03 on the Audi 2.7t BEL?
January 30, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: All turbos are pretty similar, but I am sure there are some differences. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
See_me Comments: regeneration turbocharger without balancing? very nice!
December 2, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thanks for the feedback. Glad we could help. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
lincoln302 Comments: Hi thanks for the description on rebuilding these turbos. I have one question that might of been answered. What might be the things i should look for if i keep having to drain the oil out of the inter cooler. So much comes out it looks like im changing the oil.
November 19, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Bad turbocharger seals or PCV system issue,. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Styles2Italy Comments: Thanks for this write-up, it was quite valuable when rebuilding my turbo for the first time. After the rebuild my oil pressure light has gone non-stop and I began getting a valve tick after running for a few minutes.

Is there anything in this rebuild that could affect oil circulation? I'm fairly certain that I did everything correctly. I'd honestly prefer it be this than something else failing.
October 26, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Debris may have entered on oil passage. I would check engine oil level and pressure.- Nick at Pelican Parts  
Deuter Comments: Nick at Pelican Parts,

Thanks. From other remarks a leak at the intercooler seems a likely candidate, but I will certainly check the turbo ducts as well.
October 24, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Cool, let us know what you find. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Deuter Comments: There is a definite loss of power on my 2005 VW Jetta. Around the point when the turbo usually kicks I just hear a whooshing noise. Do I have a turbo problem or is it just a hose?
October 22, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: If you hear a "whoosh", there may be a detached turbocharger duct or a leak at the intercooler. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Marshall Comments: Thanks for reply nick. No, there is no smoke from exhaust and I never would have thought something wrong with turbo until it blew intercooler hose off exhaust port. The oil spitting did cover entire engine compartment and after driving about 250 miles with nothing on exhaust turbo port I had lost about 1/4 quart oil from exhaust. Normal?
September 18, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Yeah, that is likely normal. I would keep driving. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
marshall Comments: my turbo, a kkk 03 is spitting oil out the exhaust flange which runs to the intake of the intercooler. i found this out because my intercooler hose blew off the exhaust and the rear of my vw vanagon was covered in a grease film from the spitting oil. what you think? still gets 14 pounds boost
September 12, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Some amount of oil always gathers in the intercooler pipes, in the lower spots. Is the vehicle actively smoking? If so, the turbo seals my be faulty. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
DorkOz Comments: Thank you for your great write up. My A4 B5 1.8T had all the problems that you described. I've sourced a Turbo rebuild kit, actuator and a KKK K03 Turbocharger Turbo Turbine Housing 5303-100-9019 / 53031009019.
Also recommend to everyone to clean out the oil lines to and from the Turbo. Mine had carbon sludge built-up. Used Carby Cleaner for the rubber lines, but Subaru Upper Engine Cleaner Part No. SA459 is more effective for cleaning the metal lines and internal metal parts. Ensure that you read the Safety Instructions. This stuff is CAUSTIC, and will ruin paint instantly!!
August 28, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thanks for the additional info and sharing your experience
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
kingarthur0001 Comments: hello, I just replace my ko3 because of smoke from exhaust,but unfortunately still smoke from exhaust and some kind of liquid oily and brownish compression is ok so no head gasket blowned when I got the new turbo had a little play in shaft do you think something went wrong with the new turbo now I'm thinking to rebuild my old turbo any ideas? thank you.
July 7, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff:
It depends on what color the smoke is. White smoke - coolant, black smoke - fuel , grey - engine oil. Was it a new or used turbo? If not new, it may be faulty. - Nick at Pelican Parts
 
Socal Comments: Hello I have 2003 audi a4 1.8t .. I recently changed the oil pump ... I thought my oil pump failed because there's was alot of white smoke coming from my exhaust and on the right side on my engine.... Does that mean that I just blew my turbo? I lost power too
May 28, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: White smoke is likely coolant. I would pressure test the cooling system. If the system will not hold pressure and there are no external leaks the head gasket may be faulty.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
ZA Comments: Hi Nick. My turbo had its glory years... I would just want to know if the KO4 will work on the jetta mk4 1.8T or is a straight fit job without any alterations. BTW great write up.
May 18, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: I have not tried the swap myself. But I do think it should, I stress should work with minimal modifications. Give our parts specialists a call at 1-888-280-7799. They can help you answer the question and see what else might be needed.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
terryp Comments: I have a 2002 1.8 Turbo Jetta gas there ia a lot of blue smoke,making some winding noise .When i add oil it all end up in the tha exhaust.Could you tell me what is the problem....
April 29, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Sounds like a faulty turbocharger. I would check if it is leaking oil into the exhaust. Check the intercooler pipes for large amounts of oil. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Cspauldingmd Comments: I had my K03 rebuilt a few weeks ago and I threw it in. I made sure I had primed the turbo and cranked the motor a little bit before I started it. I put about a tank of gas on it and I decided to spool it up to check how it was spooling. It spooled fine until I hit about 5 grand then it gave me a nasty high pitch screeching whistle. Could it be the turbo just needs to break in more or could it be a problem? it only whistle at higher rpms but it spools fine as I first get into it.
April 3, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Sounds like the bearing was not oiled when you spooled it. I would check to see if there was any damage. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
redspider Comments: I have 2002 jetta1.8t I hear a noise and when I give kt gas it smokes bad also before the smoke started last week I have to put oil in it like every three days or so for the last 2 months. Also I got a new oil pump about 4 months ago. Last week I got my thermostat change after driving about 10 miles is when I noticed all the smoke big clouds of smoke. What colir shoukd it be? Mines is white Grey but someone told me they can see a little blue I never hve. So my questions is could when I got thermostat done could something in that area cause or do I need another turbo charger?
March 21, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Grey smoke can be oil, black can be fuel. If the engine is noisy, there may be internal damage. Can you narrow down the noise to an area? You mentioned you suspect the turbocharger.- Nick at Pelican Parts  
besi Comments: Hi I have a 2004 passat 1.8t gls 4motion my problem is with my turbo everything is fine but when I drive the car more then 20 min and drive more than 60miles the turbo gets really hot and becomes red but but if you stop it goes away so I just wanna to ask you is that dangerous to drive the car like that here is the picture I would appreciate your help.
February 5, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: I would check if the exhaust is restricted. Check exhaust backpressure. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
1.8turbo Comments: Hi, real quick stupid question. How do I know if my turbo is blown? What obvious sign of a blown turbo? thanks
January 9, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Smoke, noise, no boost. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Jan Comments: Good job posting it with nice pictures. On pics. 21, 57, 58 I have about 1mm play of this bearing in aluminum plate. Clip holds it in place fine. Is this something to worry about?
January 7, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: It looks like the housing for the bearing is scored. If it is, you will have to replace it. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Johnathan Comments: Hello, I have a lot of white smoke and I think my turbo is blown. Do you sell K04 parts to rebuild a K03 from a 1999 AEB 1.8T A4?
January 4, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Give our parts specialists a call at 1-888-280-7799 and they can help figure out which part or repair kit you need.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
Mrrman Comments: What would a kit cost to rebuild a 2005 Beetle 1.8 turbo model? Do you sell rebuilt turbos already done?
December 16, 2013
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Give our parts specialists a call at 1-888-280-7799 and they can help figure out which part or repair kit you need.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
1.8turd Comments: Hello,

Great write up, I may have missed it but does this rebuild kit fix everything from oil leaks to shaft play? If so, where do I buy one of these kits?

Thanks
November 14, 2013
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: There bearings in the rebuild kit. Like the one shown in this photo. Give our parts specialists a call at 1-888-280-7799. They can help you find the right parts kit. - Nick at Pelican Parts
misterk03 Comments: @Nick at Pelican Parts

Where do you get the torque specs for the shaft wheel nut? How am I to be certain that it is the correct torque setting
November 12, 2013
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: The torque spec likely originated from a factory information. Also, there are general torque specs for bolt size and type. I'll try to put together some information and get it onto the Pelican tech site soon. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Lindy Comments: I just had new timing belt and plugs installed on 2001 turbo beetle. Turbo does not seem to engage now. Is there anything I can do to troubleshoot this before going back to the dealer?
October 6, 2013
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Check that all the intake and turbo hoses are properly installed. If one is loose the boost will bleed off. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Anton Comments: Was the anaerobic sealer not replaced with new?
October 1, 2013
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: You have to clean the sealing surface and use new anaerobic sealer. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
eddie Comments: im just wonder why after driving my car for like 15 min my turbo start to get hot to the point that its super red hot and my temperature gauge on my car stay normal .
thank you
September 25, 2013
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: This could be from poor oil or coolant flow, or a blocked intercooler. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Chewy Comments: In the event you accidently move the waste gate adjustment nuts, is there a basic "rule of thumb" adjustment for that? Thanks for your help.
September 17, 2013
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: There is an adjustment procedure for setting the wastegate. A quick way to do it without tools is to adjust it until it slightly presses against the spring tension of the actuator.- Nick at Pelican Parts  
kelly Comments: I just rebuilt this ko3s I'n my 03 jetta and have ran it about 30 miles when will it stop smokeing
September 3, 2013
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: It should stop smoking shortly after the oil in the exhaust system is gone. if it continues to smoke, a sealmay have been damaged during the rebuild. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
NJNightRider Comments: Thanks Nick. The whining sound occurs AFTER relatively cold engine turned OFF. Everything is stopped, except for the turbo spining down. The whine is not terribly loud, but it is definitely louder than "normal" , i.e. sound has now reached the threshold of perception. Still has great power, quickness ... do I need to rebuild ASAP or can wait a thousand miles or two ... Doing a 1,500 mile trip in October over 4 days ... Recomendations? Thanks again! Will
August 26, 2013
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: The turbo is not spinning when the engine is off. So it should not be the source of the noise. I would guess that you are hearing the coolant pump or fan. Check to see if one of those are making your noises. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
NJNightRider Comments: Hi,
2004 Passat 1.8T, ten years old, 61k on everything. Changed fully synthetic oil every 3k,. Has plenty of power, fast. Just started noticing whining sound sounds like bearingcoming from turbo area when engine is started after sitting overnight, i.e. cold start. If shut engine off while engine is still "cold", whinning sound continues ... seems to come from the turbo as it spins down. Time for rebuild?
GREAT ARticle THANKS! .. Is this for a 1.8T K03 Turbo rebuild?
Will
August 24, 2013
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: I would confirm the area the noise is coming from. It could bea bearing on a belt driven component as wel. Try starting it cold with the drive belt removed. Check if then oise still comes from the turbo area. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
kamyar Comments: Thank you
I have the turbo water inlet and outlet Hoses, connected to water Hoses Throttle Valve. Is this true? If not, please guide me that what Kia forte is correct way?
Sorry for the many questions you ask. Me in "Iran" live. Here is a low information about this.
Again, thank you
August 16, 2013
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: I don't have a lot of experience with Kia. I would look for a repair manual or contact a Kia parts seller. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
RASHIDR Comments: Hi. I noticed that you do not mention using "Anaerobic Sealer" when assembling the Compressor side. Is that not necessary? What is anaerobic sealer...?
August 15, 2013
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: There are O-rings in the turbo housing that seal it. Anaerobic sealer is a liquid or paste gasket maker that does nto require air to cure. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
kamyar Comments: Thanks for your help
Intercoolers is necessary for Turbo or Turbo can be installed without it?
Thanks
August 14, 2013
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: I would suggest keeping the intercooler in place. The engine needs it to run efficiently. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
kamyar Comments: Hi
I have a new turbo apr b6 k04 1.8t on the car engine is 2000 cc, was installed. After 2 h, the engine will slow the water pipe was isolated and I did not notice. After a few minutes the problem was fix. Afterwards, I saw the smoke coming from the exhaust was removed. And also when engine speed goes up, the sound of wheels with aluminum case can be heard. I've lost the turbo? I beg you to help me.
Thank you for everything
August 12, 2013
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: if the turbocharger was overheated you may have ruined it. I would locate the source of the noise. It could be a faulty bearing making the noise. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Rikki Tikki Comments: I'm in the process of rebuilding my turbo after leaking oil and starting to whine at 225K miles. My turbine blades are missing small chunks. Is it worth continuing or is a new turbine wheel or new K03 in order?
June 26, 2013
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: if the turbo is missing pieces I would replace it. You can try to source parts to repair it or install a new one. Personally I would go with a new unit. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
kamyar Comments: Thank you for the tips.
What might happen if a new Turbo? I oil part turbo turbo middle section turned down a bit. In your pictures, I saw that it did not. This problem may be because of this displacement?
Please show me which is part need to change.
Thank you for your assistance
May 19, 2013
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: If you are installing a new turbo you do not have to worry about the shaft moving during installation. Just make sure the oil supply and return lines are clear for proper lubrication. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
kamyar Comments: thise my problem
April 26, 2013
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thanks for the photo, see my replay in the other thread. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
kamyar Comments: Hi
Being drawn turbine noise. When the engine speed rises. After visiting turbo saw a with section aluminum turbine have a low hit. I'm very grateful for your help.
Do I need to replace a part? If so, what must be replaced?
April 26, 2013
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: The plain bearing could be faulty. Use this tech article to see how to rebuild it. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
kamyar Comments: Hi
Thank you for your efforts
I have bought a new turbo. apr b6 k04 I have it installed in the car. The problem is that when I give gas, behind the turbine air is drawn to the page. And the sound is bad.
What is the problem?
Thank you
April 23, 2013
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: What type of sound? Do you have an air leak under boost? - Nick at Pelican Parts  

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