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VW / Audi Fuel Pressure Regulator Replacement
 
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Pelican Technical Article:

VW / Audi Fuel Pressure Regulator Replacement

Peter Bodensteiner

Time:

1 hr

Tab:

$60 to $160

Talent:

***

Tools:

Locking pliers, needle-nose pliers, rags, small disposable cup or container, safety goggles and gloves

Applicable Models:

Audi A4 (1997-01)
Audi A4 Quattro (1997-01)
Audi TT (2000-04)
Audi TT Quattro (2000-04)
VW Beetle (1999-02)
VW Golf (2000-02)
VW Jetta (1998-05)
VW Passat (1996-00)

Parts Required:

New fuel pressure regulator

Hot Tip:

Old gasket may disintegrate on removal"make sure to remove any pieces left behind

Performance Gain:

A higher-pressure or adjustable FPR can help provide more fuel

Complementary Modification:

Replace fuel injectors, replace fuel filter, service intake manifold

The fuel pressure regulator (FPR) is a pretty simple device. It is a valve that is intended to keep the fuel pressure in the fuel rail at a consistent level. It receives a vacuum/boost signal from the intake manifold that influences a diaphragm within the FPR to open or close. The fuel pump, located back in the fuel tank, pumps out a consistent pressure and volume of fuel and feeds it to the fuel rail, which feeds fuel to the injectors. The FPR either lets a large volume of that fuel return to the fuel tank or restricts the flow back to the tank to adjust the pressure within the rail.

An FPR can fail, and when it does usually what happens is that an internal seal allows fuel to pass through the vacuum line and into the intake manifold. That's one reason to replace the FPR; the other is when your injectors are not providing enough fuel to the engine. This typically only happens when you're adding high levels of boost, i.e., modifying the turbo system. In this situation more air is being pushed into the engine, and the fuel injectors may be unable to provide the necessary amount of fuel to prevent the engine from running lean.

There are a number of ways to deal with this situation. They include upgrading the fuel pump, upgrading the injectors to ones that flow more fuel, and installing a fuel pressure regulator that sets the fuel rail pressure at a higher level. This last solution essentially overdrives the existing fuel injectors. In other words, the higher pressure in the fuel rail causes more fuel to be injected into the engine for a given period of time that the injector is "open."

The adjustable fuel pressure regulator provides the ability to change the fuel pressure relatively easily. This can be useful when tuning a high-performance engine, such as on a dynamometer; it's not something that you'd just crank up to give yourself more power. In any case, the project illustrated here will help you whether you're upgrading to an adjustable unit or simply replacing the stock unit--the fundamental task is the same either way.

Just as with the fuel filter, injectors, or any other component of the fuel system, it's best to relieve the fuel system of any pressure before you go opening it up. You can do this by opening the fuel filler cap and/or removing the fuel pump fuse from the car's fuse panel and then starting the car and allowing it to idle until it runs out of fuel. Also, be sure to use some protective gloves and goggles whenever you're working with fuel.

This is the fuel pressure regulator.
Figure 1

This is the fuel pressure regulator. It is located at the end of the fuel rail, and it is the last device in the fuel's path before entering the line that returns to the fuel tank. The braided line running to the lower right is the short hose that connects to the intake manifold. The fuel rail is the shiny metal tube running left to right underneath the FPR.

The FPR is secured in its boss at the end of the fuel rail by a metal clip.
Figure 2

The FPR is secured in its boss at the end of the fuel rail by a metal clip. Use a pair of locking pliers to clamp down on this clip and slide it out (toward the camera). Below the FPR in this photo, the fuel return line can be seen bending back away from the end of the fuel rail.

Grasp the clamp on the vacuum line with your pliers and pull it away to remove the vacuum line from the FPR.
Figure 3

Grasp the clamp on the vacuum line with your pliers and pull it away to remove the vacuum line from the FPR. The line on this car was fairly degraded from age and heat and will be replaced.

The FPR is ready to come out.
Figure 4

The FPR is ready to come out.

Despite looking like it would just lift right up and out of the fuel rail, the FPR was in fact held in quite tightly.
Figure 5

Despite looking like it would just lift right up and out of the fuel rail, the FPR was in fact held in quite tightly. This is because of the tight fit of the gaskets that keep the fuel and air separate from each other. I used another pair of locking pliers to grab the FPR and remove it, with a rag between the jaws and the FPR to keep from damaging it.

Once the FPR is out, you may notice that a) there's a good amount of dirt collected in the cup-shaped boss.
Figure 6

Once the FPR is out, you may notice that there's a good amount of dirt collected in the cup-shaped boss. In my case, one of the FPR's O-rings (in green), as well as a brown debris screen, remained in the fuel rail. First I used a rag to clean the debris away, hoping that would keep it from falling into the fuel rail.

Using a pair of needle-nose pliers, I removed the O-ring first.
Figure 7

Using a pair of needle-nose pliers, I removed the O-ring first.

Then I removed the debris screen.
Figure 8

Then I removed the debris screen. It was quite fragile. Even though the screen was not held in very tightly, its years of exposure to gasoline had weakened it. It came apart easily.

This meant that I needed to carefully search for any broken pieces of the debris screen so I could remove them.
Figure 9

This meant that I needed to carefully search for any broken pieces of the debris screen so I could remove them.

Here is the replacement FPR.
Figure 10

Here is the replacement FPR. Note the two green O-rings and the brown debris screen just below the larger O-ring. To adjust the new FPR, loosen the nut on top and use a small Allen wrench to turn the threaded piece. Then lock the threaded portion down by retightening the nut.

With the old FPR on the top and the new one on the bottom, it's easier to see where the O-ring and debris screen were installed on the old FPR.
Figure 11

With the old FPR on the top and the new one on the bottom, it's easier to see where the O-ring and debris screen were installed on the old FPR.

12
Figure 12

Set the new FPR in place, taking care to orient the vacuum nipple toward its counterpart on the intake manifold (the old hose is still in place in this photo)

You need to apply a little pressure to seat the new FPR properly.
Figure 13

You need to apply a little pressure to seat the new FPR properly. I centered a deep-well socket on top of the FPR and struck it with the wooden handle of a hammer (not the metal end--you don't want to have a chip come flying off of the chrome socket). A few solid taps and the new FPR was fully seated.

You have to seat the FPR in order for it to sit low enough in the fuel rail that you can install the securing clip.
Figure 14

You have to seat the FPR in order for it to sit low enough in the fuel rail that you can install the securing clip.

15
Figure 15

Once you've inserted the clip to hold the new FPR in place, attach the vacuum hose and you're done.

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Comments and Suggestions:
Thomas Comments: I have a 2001 a4 1.8t and at idle there is a loud ticking coming from what i think is the injectors and the KOEO pressure is at about 80 psi, which is alot higher then what it should be. do you think it is the FPR or something else?
October 23, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: If pressure is too high, fault regulator or restriction in return line. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Jay Comments: Thanks for the feedback Nick. I have consulted widely and it appears that the pump doesn't send fuel when it is hot. I have been advised to replace it. Do you have it available? Mine is an AWT engine. If so what is the cost and can you ship to Nairobi, Kenya?
September 23, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: I’m not the best with part numbers.

Give The Pelican Parts parts specialists a call at 1-888-280-7799. They can figure out what part or repair kit you need. - Nick at Pelican Parts
 
jay Comments: Hi I have a passat b5.5 1.8t 02 model. It starts ok morning but after driving about 10kms it hesitates then stalls; have to wait 10 min or so for it to cool then it goes repeats the same. I've changed plugs oil and filters. Could it be fuel pump or regulator?
September 17, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Could be an issue with the fuel pump. I would perform a fuel delivery system test. Check fuel pressure, volume and quality.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
Gregorski Comments: Nick, you're a legend. Passat B5 wagon here with an issue similar to weevies above, though for me the sucking sound is more like a gulping imagine old fashioned hand bellows for grandma's wood stove. Similar hard start after a fill up then and only then and the faint beeping sound also - wondered if some kind of vacuum/pressure thing related to clogged filter. Changed it but only improvement was in mileage. Could you tell us what the orvr is please? And by venting do you mean that little charcoal? filter thing that sits behind one of the wheel well liners?
Thanks mate.
June 10, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: orvr is on-board vapor recovery. There are hoses and valves to grab the HC vapors that occur during refueling.

the filer is for fresh air, if restricted it can cause fueling issues. - Nick at Pelican Parts
 
J Comments: I have a 2000 Audi TT with the Xenon type head light system and have trouble removing headlight assy from the car to trouble shoot it. The bulb is good. Swapped them and bulb works on other side. Any suggestions? Is there a thread explaining how? Access is limited to the bottom side which is hanging on after removing screws from the top. Thanks
June 8, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: The only option now is to swap the igniter. it is likely faulty, if the bulb tested good. Give The Pelican Parts parts specialists a call at 1-888-280-7799. They can figure out what part or repair kit you need.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
Jim Comments: I have a. Hard start problem, takes 4 to 5 seconds to start and then feels as if it's flooded. Once started it runs fine. I can shut it off and restart after a few moments and have the same thing. Do you think it could be the fuel regulator or pump? I have a 2000 model Audi TT . Non Quattro thanks
June 8, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Could be lack of spark or fuel delivery issue. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
G Comments: 2007 VW Jetta GLI, EPC lightand engine light blinks when trying to accelerate, and then engine eventually dies. Blogs I've read recommend changing fuel pressure regulator but unsure if that will help. Any suggestions? Or opinions what the problem could be? Dont know much about cars.. Pls help
April 18, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: It could be many things. I would start by checking the DME for fault codes. If the system is not working properly, a fault code will be set. This will be your best bet when diagnosing.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
Vin Comments: I've got a 1996 Audi A4 non turbo, the problem is when i open the fuel cap theres air preasure coming out after the engin has run for few munites
March 23, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Check if the vent or purge line is restricted. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
kellzzzz Comments: hie i have a vw golf 4 which is idling and accelerating with loud explosions in the engine. this started when i installed a new pump and the engine is stalling/losing power everytime it pops. could this still be a faulty pump
February 26, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Is the check engine light on? Sounds like an engine misfire. I would check spark, fuel and compression on all cylinders.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
bradj Comments: Is it possible for the FPR to be sticky or slightly fail without tossing up a code of any sorts? I've got an 03 GTI that runs like a bag cyl 1 and 2 injector and coil codes cold but once warm it runs perfect. I'm assuming any low pressure symptom would trigger a code like a lean system though.
January 16, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: It would cause the issue on all cylinders, not two. Is the check engine light on? Sounds like an engine misfire. I would check spark, fuel and compression on all cylinders.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
Ben Comments: Literally a three minute job. Thanks for the write up.
December 7, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thanks for the feedback. Glad we could help.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
Nass Comments: Hi Nick , I have 1.8T Audi 2004 quattro , last time I packed the fuel was empty . After 4 days I refill it with 5 liter , uunfotunatly it didn't start . What would be the problem ?
November 5, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Could be a bad fuel pump. I can't help without knowing what is missing from the system when you are trying to start it. When your engine doesn’t start you’ll want to check the basics. Check spark, fuel injector pulse and fuel pressure, volume, quality and engine compression. Are there any fault codes? Once you figure out what is missing, it will be easier to diagnose.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
cody Comments: I have a 2000 audi a4 quattro 1.8t, my fpr makes a hissing sound like a vacuum leak, I have taken this part off before to see if anything was broken or clogged a while back. And I'm overboosting and running rich, there isn't fuel leaking back through the line to the intake manifold, do you think the gaskets just aren't seated all of the way or something like that?
October 21, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Could be the vacuum hose to it has a leak. Inspect the hose. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Audiwan Kenobi Comments: Is the little screen that broke up replaceable?...where can I find the part because ECS Tuning only sale the o rings.
September 11, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: No, it is part of the regulator. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Day Comments: Thank you for the feedback. Yes the part looks similar. I will give it a try.
April 23, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Let me know how it works out. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Day Comments: Hi Nick,

I have an Audi 2005 that has a P0089 code fuel pressure regulator related. I was glad to come across this thread http://www.pelicanparts.com/techarticles/Audi_Tech/13-FUEL-Fuel_Pressure_Regulator_Replacement/13-FUEL-Fuel_Pressure_Regulator_Replacement.htm. Will this apply to my vehicle as well? mine is not Quattro - it is a turbo 2.0
April 21, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Does your regulator look similar? The procedure may be close, but not exact. You could use this as a rough guide.



Applicable Models:




Audi A4 (1997-01)
Audi A4 Quattro (1997-01)
Audi TT (2000-04)
Audi TT Quattro (2000-04)
VW Beetle (1999-02)
VW Golf (2000-02)
VW Jetta (2000-02)
VW Passat (1996-00)
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
Mostafa Berg Comments: I think what Razvan Chioaru is asking about is the fuel regeneration valve, it does click a lot yes, it shouldn't be really loud though
February 4, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: The purge solenoid does click when the engine is running, but not overly loud. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
weevies Comments: Thank you for the response! I will advise the auto tech.
January 2, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thanks for the feedback. Glad we could help.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
weevies Comments: I have a 2005 VW Jetta 5 cylinder. I had the fuel pump changed 2x and fuel sensor as well. Finally I am told by the auto mechanic it probably is the Fuel Regulator. I think this will solve the problem? Symptoms: very loud sucking sound from rear passenger side, when filling up at gas station I would start the car and sometimes it would not fire up very well and when it does I have to rev it up a lot. Also, I hear a beeping sound sometimes in the rear passenger side which sounds like a clock alarm going off. Anyway just checking to see if these sound like symptoms off a bad fuel regulator. thanks,
January 2, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Sounds like an issue with the vent line or orvr system. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
GARRY Comments: I have a turbo 1.8 t new beetle with stock ko3s turbo but have other mods including software , 3 inch exhaust fcai , running high boost ,etc...I want to get the adjustable 4 bar fpr but how do i know what the correct adjustment on it would be ?
December 9, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: I do not. Check with the manufacturer of the turbo or software. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
steven Comments: I have a 2007 audi a4 with a EVAP problem I sent smoke to eny part u gesture still is given me a same code what's u perform?
November 16, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Could be a faulty solenoid or canister. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Andre Comments: If an AUDI a4 seldom stalls while in motion, or does hard start, is it that the fuel filter, fuel pressure regulator or fuel pump is bad?
June 22, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: It could be a fuel delivery issue. I would perform a fuel delivery system test. Check fuel pressure, volume and quality.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
Mike Comments: Very well written and easy to follow. Good pics help a lot. I have a 1999 jetta that has this exact regulator. I will be replacing it shortly. Thanks
June 14, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thanks for the feedback. Glad we could help.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
ned Comments: So far replacing the far has stopped my a4 from misfiring in 2nd cylinder
May 23, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thanks for the follow up. We appreciate it.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
Razvan Chioaru Comments: is this the one that "ticks" alot when its working good?
does a fast tick tick tick tick under the air intake cover.
February 26, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: I don't think so. What component are you referring to? Can you share a photo? - Nick at Pelican Parts  

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