Audi Parts Catalog Audi Accessories Catalog Audi Technical Articles VW-Audi Tech Forums
 
  Search our site:    
View Recent Cars  |   Cart  | Project List | Order Status | Help    
 >  >
VW / Audi Intake Manifold Removal
 
Bookmark and Share

Pelican Technical Article:

VW / Audi Intake Manifold Removal

Peter Bodensteiner

Time:

2 hr

Tab:

$10

Talent:

****

Tools:

10mm wrench/sockets, 5mm and 6mm Allen fastener wrenches/sockets, ratchet extension, locking pliers, Phillips and flat-blade screwdrivers, drain pan

Applicable Models:

 
Audi A4 (1997-01)
Audi TT (2000-04)
VW Beetle (1999-02)
VW Golf (2000-02)
VW Jetta (2000-02)
VW Passat (1996-00)

Parts Required:

New intake manifold gasket, O-rings for coolant line and fuel injectors, replacement hose clamps and hoses as needed, coolant

Hot Tip:

Lots of little steps to this one, but none of them are particularly difficult individually; take your time and be patient

Performance Gain:

Depends on why you are removing the intake manifold

Complementary Modification:

Replace fuel injectors, coolant replacement, intercooler flush, valve cover gasket

While there are a few reasons you might need to remove the intake manifold, it's more likely that you will be able to use the information in this project a) for another job that just happens to require removing the intake manifold (removing the cylinder head, for example), or b) as a guided tour to the driver's side of the engine bay, which contains many lines and components that might require your attention at some point.

The car in the photos has a drive-by-wire throttle system (and, despite having an ATW code stamped on it, the intake setup most resembles the AWM-coded engine). This means that the throttle plate on the inlet of the intake manifold is actuated by an electric motor and receives a signal from the ECU, rather than being connected by cable to the accelerator pedal. Earlier versions of the 1.8T are equipped with a cable-operated throttle and thus will require the extra step of disconnecting that cable at the throttle body. This cable runs to the throttle body via the gap between the first and second intake runner.

As with most intensive underhood work, you should disconnect the battery at the negative cable terminal and remove the plastic engine cover before starting. Also take a look at the Replacing Fuel Injectors project for information on how to move those components and the fuel rail out of the way. And, of course, disconnect the intake hose leading from the intercooler to the intake manifold itself.

You should also drain at least some coolant from either the radiator drain (hard to do if you still have the bumper on the car), or by disconnecting one of the coolant hoses under the hood and then draining a portion of the coolant that way. Because you only need to drain enough so that you don't splatter coolant all over when you do have to disconnect the necessary hoses, it seems logical that draining via these hoses would minimize the amount of coolant you lose.

It's not a bad idea to label the hoses and lines you remove during this project. You may not need labels to hook everything back up again when you're done, but it can't hurt. At the very least, take some photos for reference, particularly if it's going to be a while before you reconnect everything.

You need to get this coolant reservoir out of the way; first remove the three Phillips screws holding it in place.
Figure 1

You need to get this coolant reservoir out of the way; first remove the three Phillips screws holding it in place. Remember to disconnect the electrical connector at the bottom of the reservoir; this will allow you to move and position the reservoir as needed to control the draining of coolant and eventually to remove it from the car. Use some pliers to move the hose clamp of the smaller of the two hoses and then pull the hose off of the reservoir.

When you remove this lower hose, the coolant inside the reservoir will drain out; You can also use this lower hose to drain additional coolant.
Figure 2

When you remove this lower hose, the coolant inside the reservoir will drain out; You can also use this lower hose to drain additional coolant. Keep it upright while you drain the reservoir and then direct the hose to your drain pan. With this you should be able to lower the level of the coolant in the system enough that you won't experience any gushers when you remove the additional coolant connections, which are all at the top of the coolant system.

Remove the coolant reservoir and this is what you'll seeâ€
Figure 3

Remove the coolant reservoir and this is what you'll see - more room to work. Note that the fuel rail and injectors are out of the way, as is the intake hose leading to the throttle body.

Go to the front of the engine, next to the timing belt cover.
Figure 4

Go to the front of the engine, next to the timing belt cover. Remove the metal clip connecting the wiring harness to the camshaft position sensor and slip the connector off. This, again gives better access and more room to work.

Pull this vacuum hose off of the intake manifold.
Figure 5

Pull this vacuum hose off of the intake manifold.

On the back side of the manifold, disconnect this larger vacuum line, using some pliers to grip the hose clamp if necessary.
Figure 6

On the back side of the manifold, disconnect this larger vacuum line, using some pliers to grip the hose clamp if necessary.

Next, remove the wiring to the air intake temperature sender.
Figure 7

Next, remove the wiring to the air intake temperature sender. Like the camshaft position sensor, just slide the metal retaining clip up and then pull the connector straight off. (Tip: You don't need to remove the metal clip on the cam position and temp sensor to remove the plugs. Just squeeze them in to unlock the retaining tabs and then pull.)

Just behind that sensor connection you'll see another vacuum line connected to an L-shaped pipe extending from the intake manifold.
Figure 8

Just behind that sensor connection you'll see another vacuum line connected to an L-shaped pipe extending from the intake manifold. Loosen the hose clamp and slide the line off.

Next is the electrical connector for the throttle valve control module.
Figure 9

Next is the electrical connector for the throttle valve control module. This is a different connector than the two earlier ones, but it's similar to many others around the car. Insert a screwdriver into the rectangular hole in the side of the connector and lever the connector arm up so that the connector can slide off the notch that holds it in place.

The connector slides off like so.
Figure 10

The connector slides off like so.

This is one of the three bolts holding the â€Ã...
Figure 12

This is one of the three bolts holding the "magic triangle" in place. It is the one to the rear of the car. You have to feel around a bit to find the three bolts. The middle bolt (at the "point" of the triangle) is closer to you when viewing from this position, not on the engine side of the triangle. The bolt closest to the front of the car is best reached from the other side of the throttle body. Remove all three bolts.

This is the upper radiator hose, where it meets the coolant pipe that runs along the top of the intake manifold.
Figure 13

This is the upper radiator hose, where it meets the coolant pipe that runs along the top of the intake manifold. Use your pliers to slide the hose clamp away from the end of the hose and then pull the hose off of the pipe.

The coolant pipe is secured to the intake manifold with this 10mm bolt, although the Bentley manual indicates that this may be an Allen-head bolt on some cars.
Figure 14

The coolant pipe is secured to the intake manifold with this 10mm bolt, although the Bentley manual indicates that this may be an Allen-head bolt on some cars. Either way, you need to remove it (tighten it to 7.5 ft-lb upon reinstallation).

Here's another area that is hard to photograph.
Figure 15

Here's another area that is hard to photograph. At the rear of the engine, between the engine and the firewall, the coolant pipe that runs across the top of the intake manifold makes a turn and connects to a flange with two 10mm bolts (7.5 ft-lb). The pipe and the upper bolt can be seen here, looking in from above on the driver's side of the car. The lower 10mm bolt can be seen just peeking out below the pipe.

With the bolts removed, it's easier to see how and where the pipe connects behind the engine.
Figure 16

With the bolts removed, it's easier to see how and where the pipe connects behind the engine. Inside the pipe is an O-ring that should be replaced.

Last hose: Disconnect this vacuum hose that leads to the grey ACF (Activated Charcoal Filter) on the right, My finger indicates where this line hooks up to the intake manifold.
Figure 17

Last hose: Disconnect this vacuum hose that leads to the grey ACF (Activated Charcoal Filter) on the right, My finger indicates where this line hooks up to the intake manifold.

The intake manifold is supported by this black rod that reaches down to the bracket that was removed in the Water Pump project.
Figure 18

The intake manifold is supported by this black rod that reaches down to the bracket that was removed in the Water Pump project. You don't need to remove this lower 6mm Allen bolt (15 ft-lb). Just loosen it enough that you can rotate it out of the way once you remove the upper bolt.

Speaking of the upper bolt (15 ft-lb), use an extension to reach itâ€
Figure 19

Speaking of the upper bolt (15 ft-lb), use an extension to reach it--it's directly under the inlet of the manifold.

Now you can swing the bracket down and away from the intake manifold.
Figure 20

Now you can swing the bracket down and away from the intake manifold.

Remove the oil dipstick, which is situated between the second and third intake runners.
Figure 21

Remove the oil dipstick, which is situated between the second and third intake runners.

The bracket that holds the orange plastic oil dipstick receptacle in place attaches to the intake manifold at the cylinder head, using these two 5mm Allen-head bolts.
Figure 22

The bracket that holds the orange plastic oil dipstick receptacle in place attaches to the intake manifold at the cylinder head, using these two 5mm Allen-head bolts. Note that the plastic was brittle from exposure to the heat of the engine and has cracked.

Now you can start on the fasteners that connect the intake manifold to the cylinder head.
Figure 23

Now you can start on the fasteners that connect the intake manifold to the cylinder head. At each lower outside corner you will find a 10mm nut, mounted on a stud that will prevent you from using a standard-depth socket or nut driver.

Here's the nut at the lower corner toward the rear of the engine.
Figure 24

Here's the nut at the lower corner toward the rear of the engine. Note the bracket that this nut also holds in place and try to remember it when you reinstall the intake manifold.

Remove the rest of the 10mm Allen-head bolts using a socket or Allen wrench.
Figure 25

Remove the rest of the 10mm Allen-head bolts using a socket or Allen wrench.

Now you can remove the intake manifold.
Figure 26

Now you can remove the intake manifold. Rock it back and forth a bit to work it loose and then pull it straight away from the head to lift it off of the two studs on the lower outside corners.

27
Figure 27

With the intake manifold removed, the engine bay looks a lot roomier!

Here's another look at the rear of the head with the intake manifold removed.
Figure 28

Here's another look at the rear of the head with the intake manifold removed. You can see the bracket that attaches to the mounting stud, as well as the old intake manifold gasket in place. Note the amount of dirt and debris surrounding the intake ports - place some rags inside the intake ports before you clean this up to keep the dirt from entering the intake ports.

This is a wider view of the intake ports, with the gasket still in place, after the removal of the intake manifold.
Figure 29

This is a wider view of the intake ports, with the gasket still in place, after the removal of the intake manifold.

Look straight down into the intake port and you can easily see the unique three-intake-valve configuration of the 1.
Figure 30

Look straight down into the intake port and you can easily see the unique three-intake-valve configuration of the 1.8's cylinder head.

Remove the old intake manifold gasket.
Figure 31

Remove the old intake manifold gasket. Look for any gasket material that may have remained on the surface of the cylinder head.

If you're so inclined, you can clean your intake manifold before you reinstall it.
Figure 32

If you're so inclined, you can clean your intake manifold before you reinstall it. Mine was particularly gunky around the injectors. Here I've cleaned the #4 runner, while the others are still as-removed.

After you've cleaned out the areas around the intake ports, put the new gasket in place, locating it with the two outer studs.
Figure 33

After you've cleaned out the areas around the intake ports, put the new gasket in place, locating it with the two outer studs. Note the triangular mounting plate (the one that mounts to the underside of the intake manifold) to the right side of the photo.

Put the intake manifold back in place and tighten the bolts that hold it to they cylinder head to 7.
Figure 34

Put the intake manifold back in place and tighten the bolts that hold it to they cylinder head to 7.5 ft-lb, tightening in a spiraling pattern from the center bolts to the outside.

Bookmark and Share
Comments and Suggestions:
Topman511 Comments: How long does it take on avergae to remove the inlet manifold on an A4 1.8T
December 1, 2016
colinmverduzco Comments: I was just wondering what the name of the part in picture 33 is. The part on my car is broken in two places, and I have a pretty bad oil leak. I thought the car was a vacuum hose, but when I look at it I see it covered in oil. I've outlined the hose in red in a picture I've attached to this comment. Thank you so much!
September 4, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Looks like a breather pipe. Give The Pelican Parts parts specialists a call at 1-888-280-7799. They can figure out what part or repair kit you need.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
Brommer Comments: The Inlet Camshaft control valve is at the top right rear end of motor just below valve cover it has three bolts on top into block and an electrical connection
May 19, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: You can't use then engine without that connected and working with the DME. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Brommer Comments: Thanks Nick.
I am fitting a AUM 1,8T 20 Valve motor in a Combi T25/T3
it previously had a AGU motor in, the AGU did not have this control valve, do I have to connect it or will it run without it. I think this valve only works on warm up.
May 18, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: What control valve are you referring to? - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Brommer Comments: love your instructions and advice spot on.

could you advise on the function of the Inlet Camshaft control valve on the AUM 1,8 t motor

by the by I found the bolts on the clutch to be 12mm not 10mm triple square

regards
louis
May 11, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Advise? Are you looking for traning info? i don;t have any to share. The actuator changes camshaft angle depending on the driving condition per a programmed map in the DME. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Kem Comments: You don't need to remove the metal clip on the cam position and temp sensor to remove the plugs. Just squeeze them in to unlock the retaining tabs and then pull.
February 17, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thanks for the additional info and feedback. We appreciate it.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
Jyoti Comments: Hey Peter and Wayne,

My passat has a cable-operated throttle. Do you have any description of how to disconnect the cable and other related operations to remove the intake manifold?

Cheers,
Jyoti
August 31, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: We don't currently have that tech article.

To remove the cable, open the throttle, then pull the cable end out of the throttle lever, it will unclip.
'
I would grab a repair manual. It will have the procedure, special tools and torque specs.

Give our parts specialists a call at 1-888-280-7799. - Nick at Pelican Parts
 
old and lost Comments: I need to remove throttle body on 1998 vw jetta gt. How do I remove the plenum, and what tools will I need, and parts to reinstall.
God bless you for the help.
November 23, 2013
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: What size engine? I'm guessing the VR6. I guess if I were you I would remove the air intake duct and then the 4 bolts that mount the throttle body to the intake manifold. Then Disconenct one by one the hoses and electrical connector attached to the throttle body. Mark everything as is comes off or take pictures with your phone or camera so you know how each part goes on the new throttle body. You can also call our parts specialist at 888 280 7799 and purchase a manual with photos of all the steps. - Kerry at Pelican Parts  

  Search our site:    

View Cart & CheckOut | Project List | Order Status |  Help    

 

[Home] [Customer Service] [Shopping Cart] [Project/Wish List]
  [Privacy Statement]  [Contact Us] [About Us] [Shipping] [Careers]

Copyright © Pelican Parts Inc. -    DMCA Registered Agent Contact Page

Page last updated: Sat 12/3/2016 02:01:58 AM