Audi Parts Catalog Audi Accessories Catalog Audi Technical Articles VW-Audi Tech Forums
 
  Search our site:    
View Recent Cars  |   Cart  | Project List | Order Status | Help    
 >  >
Replacing Your Audi A4 Rear Springs
 
Bookmark and Share

Pelican Technical Article:

Replacing Your Audi A4 Rear Springs

Steve Vernon

Time:

1 hour1 hr

Tab:

$250

Talent:

**

Tools:

Jack, jack stands, 18mm socket, spring compressor, T25 Torx

Applicable Models:

Audi A4 (2002-05)
Audi A4 Cabriolet (2003-06)

Parts Required:

New springs

Hot Tip:

Check your bushings

Performance Gain:

Better handling

Complementary Modification:

New Shocks

The springs on your car are an import component of the suspension system and along with the shocks should be checked at least once a year. You want to look for worn out bushings/mounts along with any damage including rust to the spring. People also like to change out there springs when performing suspension modifications on their cars. If you are interested in changing your springs out for after market or a sportier spring rate make sure you match up the shocks to go with your new springs. The shock and springs work in tandem and just changing one may result in worse performance than when you started.

People complain about how difficult the rear springs are to replace on the Audi A4 and suggest all kinds of things to try, from having someone jump up and down on the hub to using pry bars to help remove the springs. If you follow each step of the instructions the springs are relatively easy to remove, they just involve a few more steps than a 'normal spring' would. Taking short cuts trying to replace them will probably end up adding time rather than saving it.

Begin by safely lifting and supporting the vehicle. Please see our article on safely raising and supporting your vehicle for further assistance. Remove the rear wheels, wheel well liners and shocks. Please see our articles on these procedures for additional information.

With the shock removed you want to place the spring compressors as far apart from each other as possible (red arrows) while still allowing enough room to access them and compress the springs.
Figure 1

With the shock removed you want to place the spring compressors as far apart from each other as possible (red arrows) while still allowing enough room to access them and compress the springs. You will want to compress the springs as much as you can; this will take a little time as there is not a lot of room to get your wrench in. If you can compress the springs far enough that you can safely remove them from their mounts you can skip the next four steps but if you find yourself reaching for a pry bar continue on with these instructions.

You are going to lower the side of the sub-frame you are working on.
Figure 2

You are going to lower the side of the sub-frame you are working on. Each side of the sub-frame is held in place by two long 18mm bolts. To access the front bolt use a T35 Torx and remove the three Torx screws holding the lower guard in place (red arrows).

With the lower guard removed you can get easy access to the from sub-frame bolt (yellow arrow).
Figure 3

With the lower guard removed you can get easy access to the from sub-frame bolt (yellow arrow). Note that the spring is almost completely compressed at this point (yellow arrow).

With the rear sub-frame bolt still safely secured loosen the front bolt (yellow arrow).
Figure 4

With the rear sub-frame bolt still safely secured loosen the front bolt (yellow arrow). You can see in this picture that the bolt can be lowered approximately 1 inch and still have plenty of thread to safely support the sub-frame.

Slowly lower the rear sub-frame bolt (red arrow) until the sub-frame has lower approximately one inch.
Figure 5

Slowly lower the rear sub-frame bolt (red arrow) until the sub-frame has lower approximately one inch. This will give you plenty of room to remove the spring. When reinstalling it is best to lift the sub-frame assembly with a jack and then retighten the sub-frame bolts.

With the sub-frame lowered and the spring compressed the spring and rubber isolator will easily come out of its mounts.
Figure 6

With the sub-frame lowered and the spring compressed the spring and rubber isolator will easily come out of its mounts.

If you are installing new springs it is important to get the compressors in the same spot on the new springs as they were on the old (red arrows).
Figure 7

If you are installing new springs it is important to get the compressors in the same spot on the new springs as they were on the old (red arrows). It is a tight fit and failure to install the compressors correctly may not allow you enough room to un-compress them once installed into the mounts. Also make sure the rubber pucks or isolators are installed in the correct position or this will affect the ride and also the life of the pucks. Installation is the reverse of removal.

Bookmark and Share

  Search our site:    

View Cart & CheckOut | Project List | Order Status |  Help    

 

[Home] [Customer Service] [Shopping Cart] [Project/Wish List]
  [Privacy Statement]  [Contact Us] [About Us] [Shipping] [Careers]

Copyright © Pelican Parts Inc. -    DMCA Registered Agent Contact Page

Page last updated: Sat 12/3/2016 02:46:54 AM