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Changing Your Audi A4 Torque Mount Bushing
 
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Pelican Technical Article:

Changing Your Audi A4 Torque Mount Bushing

Steve Vernon

Time:

1 hour1 hr

Tab:

$7 to $40

Talent:

**

Tools:

13mm socket, 6mm Allen

Applicable Models:

Audi A4 (2002-05)
Audi A4 Cabriolet (2003-06)

Parts Required:

New torque bushing

Hot Tip:

Use a stiffer aftermarket bushing if you have upgraded the motor

Performance Gain:

Eliminate wheel excessive engine movement

Complementary Modification:

Replace motor mounts

The Audi A4 has a four-cylinder turbocharged inline engine. This engine is mounted in the traditional fashion in the car, which means the front of the engine or crankshaft faces the front of the vehicle. Like all engines the motor will want to twist as it tries to put the power to the ground -- this is referred to as the engine torqueing around its mounts.

To help eliminate some of this movement or torque Audi has installed a non-solid contact torque mount. The mount does not have a solid connection between the motor and the chassis but has a mount both on the motor and one on the chassis with a rubber or polyurethane bushing between them. When the engine starts to twist, the bushing mounted to the engine side makes contact with the mount on the chassis side and starts to compress and absorb the torque. This stops the engines movement and transfers that energy into the bushing. These bushings wear out over time and wear out quicker if the engine has been modified to produce more power.

Replacing the bushing is easy; the only issue being is that you need to move the lock carrier into the service position. While you can remove the engine side mount to perform this work, please be aware that Audi considers the hardware to be single use only and must be replaced after removal.

If you are replacing the bushing you may want to consider an aftermarket replacement. There are many options for aftermarket insert that will help stiffen up the bushing and decrease movement. These bushings traditionally offer a bushing that is made of a much stiffer compound and reduces the amount of flex the motor can produce. Be warned that by doing this you will also be transferring more vibrations to the cabin.

If you are going to remove the mount from the motor you do not need to move the lock carrier to the service position, but you will need to replace the hardware.
Figure 1

If you are going to remove the mount from the motor you do not need to move the lock carrier to the service position, but you will need to replace the hardware. This article was performed with the lock carrier in the service position. Begin by safely jacking up and supporting your car. With the car safely off the ground you can remove the trays. A great many of these cars have had the engine trays removed over the years and not replaced or replaced with different hardware or fasteners. The front tray and transmission tray share three common fasteners (green arrows). To remove the front tray, remove the three common fasteners (green arrows), the eight under tray fasteners (red arrows) and the two fasteners in the wheel well (yellow arrows). Then lower the tray down and out from the engine area. Use care when lowering it. If you have had any leaks there can be fluid stored up in the tray.

With the lock carrier in the service position you can see the mount with its three 6mm single use Allen bolts (red arrows) as well as the bushing (yellow arrow).
Figure 2

With the lock carrier in the service position you can see the mount with its three 6mm single use Allen bolts (red arrows) as well as the bushing (yellow arrow).

If you have not moved the lock carrier you can remove the mount by removing the three 6mm Allen bolts (red arrows) and replace the bushing with the mount off the car.
Figure 3

If you have not moved the lock carrier you can remove the mount by removing the three 6mm Allen bolts (red arrows) and replace the bushing with the mount off the car.

You can see in this picture that this bushing is almost completely destroyed and has been allowed to go long past its change out date (red arrow).
Figure 4

You can see in this picture that this bushing is almost completely destroyed and has been allowed to go long past its change out date (red arrow). If you leave a bushing in this condition in place it can eventually cause damage to the mounts by having metal on metal contact. Inspect and replace your bushings long before they get to this point.

Pull the old bushing off and clean around the mount (red arrow).
Figure 5

Pull the old bushing off and clean around the mount (red arrow). When installing your new bushing, whether factory or aftermarket, always try to dry install it or at the very least if you are using a lubricant make sure it will not cause the bushing to deteriorate at a quicker rate.

This photo illustrates the receiver mount on the lower cross frame (red arrow) that the bushing sits in.
Figure 6

This photo illustrates the receiver mount on the lower cross frame (red arrow) that the bushing sits in. If you let the bushing go to the point that there is damage from the metal on metal contact between the mounts and this mount gets cracked, you can replace it by removing the three 13mm nuts and installing a new mount.


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