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Rear Brake Pad Replacement
 
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Pelican Technical Article:

Rear Brake Pad Replacement

Jared Fenton

Time:

2 hours2 hrs

Tab:

$50

Talent:

****

Tools:

13mm/15mm wrenches, brake piston retraction tool, floor jack,

Applicable Models:

Audi A6 (1997-04)
Audi S6 (2002-03)

Parts Required:

Rear brake pads

Hot Tip:

Use a brake piston tool to retract the piston

Performance Gain:

Better braking

Complementary Modification:

Replace brake discs

Replacing your brake pads is one of the easier jobs to perform on your C5 Audi A6. In general, you should inspect your brake pads about every 10,000 miles and replace them if the brake lining of the pad has worn down enough to risk damaging the rotors.

If you ignore the problem after inspection and keep driving, the brake lining of the pad will wear away completely and the metal backing plate will start to grind into the metal face of the rotor. Using the brakes during this condition will not only give you inadequate braking, but will also begin to cut grooves in your brake discs. Once the discs are grooved, they are damaged, and there is often no way to repair them. Sometimes you will be able to resurface the discs, but often the groove cut will be deeper than is allowed by Audi specifications. The smart thing to do is to replace your pads as soon as possible.

The procedure for replacing pads on all the wheels is pretty much the same. There are slight configuration differences between front and rear brakes, but in general the procedure for replacement is very similar.

This procedure requires jacking up the rear of the car and removing the rear wheels. Please see our article on Jacking up your C5 Audi A6 for more information.

When you are finished, press on the brake pedal repeatedly to make sure that the pads and the pistons seat properly. Also check the master cylinder brake fluid reservoir and top off the fluid if necessary. Brake pads typically take between 100 and 200 miles to completely break in. It's typical for braking performance to suffer slightly as the pads begin their wear-in period. Make sure that you avoid any heavy braking during this period.

Shown here is the complete rear brake assembly for the Audi A6.
Figure 1

Shown here is the complete rear brake assembly for the Audi A6. In order to replace the brake pads (green arrow), the caliper must first be removed.

Left and Right Sides - The caliper is secured to the caliper mount by two lock nut connections (green arrows) at the top and bottom.
Figure 2

Left and Right Sides - The caliper is secured to the caliper mount by two lock nut connections (green arrows) at the top and bottom. Both of these will need to be removed to remove the caliper. Check that the emergency brake is disengaged. If the brake is on, you won't be able to remove the caliper.

Left and Right Sides - Use a 15mm wrench to hold the locking pin (green arrow) while removing the 13mm locking bolt (blue arrow).
Figure 3

Left and Right Sides - Use a 15mm wrench to hold the locking pin (green arrow) while removing the 13mm locking bolt (blue arrow). Do this for both the top and bottom connections. Once the bolts are removed, carefully pull the caliper off the mount and pads. Keep in mind that you may need to use a narrow profiled 15mm wrench to fit.

Left and Right Sides - Now pull the caliper up and off the mounting frame.
Figure 4

Left and Right Sides - Now pull the caliper up and off the mounting frame. You may need to use a wrench or screwdriver to carefully pry it up and off. If the caliper doesn't budge, make sure the emergency brake is off. 

Left and Right Sides - Don't let the caliper hang from the brake lines once removed.
Figure 5

Left and Right Sides - Don't let the caliper hang from the brake lines once removed. You can place the caliper on the rear control arm as shown here using the "ears" (green arrow) to hold it in place.

Left and Right Sides - Now slide the brake pads (green arrows) off the caliper-mounting frame.
Figure 6

Left and Right Sides - Now slide the brake pads (green arrows) off the caliper-mounting frame.

Left and Right Sides - It's a good idea to pull the caliper guide pins (green arrow) out of the caliper and clean/lubricate them with brake grease.
Figure 7

Left and Right Sides - It's a good idea to pull the caliper guide pins (green arrow) out of the caliper and clean/lubricate them with brake grease. You should be able to pop the rubber boot right off the caliper frame. If the boot is damaged, you should replace it.

Left and Right Sides - Take note of the metal clips on the rear of the old brake pads (green arrow).
Figure 8

Left and Right Sides - Take note of the metal clips on the rear of the old brake pads (green arrow). You should receive a set of new clips with the pads. Be sure to fit them before installing the new pads.

Left and Right Sides - As the brake pad wears, the piston will extend further out of its bore.
Figure 9

Left and Right Sides - As the brake pad wears, the piston will extend further out of its bore. Installing new pads requires pushing the piston back inside the bore. The rear calipers have the parking brake assembly integrated into the caliper. Hence, you also need to turn the piston as you press. You need a brake piston tool as shown here to do the job. Installing the new pads is the reverse order of removal.

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Page last updated: Tue 9/19/2017 03:31:58 AM