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Clutch Cable / Helper Spring Replacement & Adjustment
 
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Pelican Technical Article:

Clutch Cable / Helper Spring Replacement & Adjustment

Time:

2-3 hours

Tab:

$205

Talent:

***

Tools:

Metric socket set, metric wrench set, WD-40, long flathead screwdriver, vise-grips, floor jack, two jack stands, two wheel chocks, safety glasses, torque wrench, snap ring pliers, Dremel tool with cut-off wheel, helper, tape measure or micrometer

Applicable Models:

Porsche 911 (1965-89)
Porsche 912 (1965-69)
Porsche 930 Turbo (1976-89)

Parts Required:

Clutch cable, helper spring

Performance Gain:

A clutch pedal that offers the right amount of travel and feel for shifting your 911 with ease

Complementary Modification:

Replace the clutch
Before you decide that your clutch needs replacement, serious consideration should be given to your clutch cable.  I had a 911 that I recently purchased (the subject of all these tech articles), and I thought for sure that the clutch was going bad.  It was getting worse everyday, and I thought that a complete clutch job would be the answer to fixing it.  It turned out that it did need a new clutch, but it would have also lasted quite a bit longer had I not replaced it.

The symptoms that it was exhibiting were a really stiff pedal, combined with a very long throw to disengage the clutch.  It was so bad that the only way to get the car to release the clutch was to remove the floor boards and push the pedal all the way to the floor.  Needless to say, I removed the engine, replaced the clutch, and then reinstalled everything, only to find that there was little or no improvement in the feel of the clutch!  Frustrated, I replaced the clutch cable and helper spring, and the problems vanished.  It is with a little egg on my face that I confess that I was mistaken about the clutch going bad.  My suggestion, based on this experience is to replace all the easy components first, and then move on to the really tough stuff later on.  Don't replace the clutch without replacing the clutch cable and helper spring first.

The photos that accompany this article are taken of my 1982 911SC, and may differ slightly from your car depending upon the year and transmission.  The procedure should be the same for all of the later model 915 transmissions (1973-89).  I will add some details on the clutch cable replacement procedure for cars with the 901 transmission in the near future.  In general, the principles of cable replacement are the same, and you should be able to garner enough information from this example to apply to your own 911.  Besides, you can always feel free to ask us questions.

Replacement of the cable is a really simple job.  I like to start at the end of the cable that is located underneath the pedals on the driver's side.  You can gain access to this end of the cable by removing the wooden floorboard that protects the pedal cluster.  Start by taking out the driver's side floor mat and carpet.  The wooden floorboard is attached to the chassis by a few nuts.  Remove these, and you should be able to negotiate the board out of its position.  Once you have the floorboard removed, the pedal cluster should be visible, as shown in (Figure 1).

The first step is to locate the end of the clutch cable that is attached to the pedal cluster.  The cable has a trunion pin on the end, and a small retaining clip in order to hold it onto the pedal cluster end.  The trunion pin and retaining clip are shown in (Figure 2).  Depending upon the age of your car, and the amount of corrosion in your pedal cluster area, the retaining pin may be difficult to remove.  I would spray the entire area with some WD-40, and let it sit for awhile as the lubricant gets into the retaining pin.  A long screwdriver, a pair of vise-grips, and plenty of elbow grease should loosen it up enough for you to get the retaining pin off.  Don't worry about damaging the pin either, as they are pretty inexpensive to replace.

Once you get the retaining clip removed, you need to remove the trunion pin.  This is because you will pull the cable out of the car from the rear.  When you have the cable disconnected and the trunion pin removed, your car should resemble (Figure 3).

Now it's time to move to the other end of the cable, located under your transmission.  Unless you are really, really thin, you will need to jack up the car.  Refer to our Pelican Technical Article, 911 Engine Removal Made Easy for instructions and pictures on the best methods to jack up and secure your car.  Once the car is elevated, take a closer look at the clutch lever arm assembly.  You need to remove the clutch cable from where it is clamped to the transmission.  (Figure 4) shows the clutch cable adjustment nuts, which both adjust the throw of the clutch, and secure the cable in place.  Loosen up these two nuts, and the cable should slide right off.   When there is slack in the cable, the end should slide off of the hook, shown in (Figure 5).  Now pull out the cable from underneath the car.  If you have properly removed the trunion pin from the other end of the cable, it should just slide out underneath the car.

Installation of the new cable is relatively easy.  Take the new cable, and guide the threaded end into the tube located on the firewall.  (Figure 6) shows where the cable should go.  Once you have the new cable pushed up against the firewall (Figure 7), then make sure the protective sheath surrounds the tube, as shown in (Figure 8).  Once the cable is in place, you can move back to the front of the car, and screw on the trunion pin and reattach the cable to the pedal cluster.  I advise using a new retaining clip.  Don't reattach the floorboards just yet, as you might need to adjust the position of the trunion on the clutch cable later on.

Now it's time to replace your helper spring, shown in (Figure 9).  I highly recommend doing this when you replace your clutch cable.  The helper spring does what its name implies - it helps with the motion of engaging and disengaging the clutch.  With many cycles on the clutch, it can lose it's ability to 'help.'  To replace the helper spring, you need to remove the clutch cable lever arm assembly, shown in (Figure 10).  Start by removing the small return spring that helps remove the backlash from the linkage, as shown in (Figure 11).  Make sure that you disconnect and remove the spring , because it will most likely get lost.  Now, remove the small circlip on the small lever arm, as shown in (Figure 12).  Slide this arm off its shaft using a small screwdriver.  This is shown in (Figure 13).  Once this arm is off, the main arm assembly should be able to be slid off.  Beware of the force of the 'U-shaped' clutch arm helper spring, as this is loaded pretty tight, and will spring back when you pull off the arm.  The helper spring can only move within a small radius, so you don't have too much chance of getting hurt unless you purposely stick your fingers in there.  (Figure 14) shows the entire lever arm assembly being removed.  After the entire assembly is removed, the bottom of your transmission should look like (Figure 15).

Getting the helper spring off of the shaft on the lever arm is probably the hardest part of this job.  The Porsche factory manuals recommend that you press out the entire little shaft that the helper spring is attached to.  I feel that's not necessary and a bit too much work.  Start by removing the small circlip that appears to hold in the helper spring on.  In reality, this circlip basically does nothing because the helper spring is pressed onto the small shaft that it rotates on, as shown in (Figure 16).  I removed my helper spring by cutting it off with a Dremmel rotary tool.  The Dremmel tool is one of the most important tools in my collection.  I used it to cut the outer 'layers' of the helper spring, and most of the last layer.  If you are careful in your cutting, you should be able to cut close enough so that you can then snap off the remaining helper spring 'layer' with a screwdriver.  This seemed to be better than replacing a whole bunch of parts in the arm assembly that got ruined when you pressed out the helper spring shaft.

Installing the new helper spring is a breeze; just tap it on with a hammer.  Just make sure before you tap it on that it's facing the correct way, otherwise you might have a difficult time getting it off.  If you happened to damage the circlip when removing it (I did), then use a new one.  Make sure that you install all of the washers in the proper order.  Refer to (Figure 17) for guidance.  Once you have the new helper spring installed on the clutch lever arm assembly, install the assembly back onto the transmission.  Be careful to align the splined small lever arm into the correct position.  There should be an adjustment screw that should be very close to contacting the larger lever arm, as shown in (Figure 18).

Once you have the entire assembly installed, you are ready to adjust your clutch cable.  With the cable completely disconnected, adjust the small adjustment screw, shown previously in (Figure 18), until you have a clearance gap of 1.2 mm.  This procedure is shown in (Figure 21).  Tighten up the adjusting screw with the lock nut.  Now, attach the new clutch cable end (Figure 19) to the small hook on the lever arm, as previously shown in (Figure 9).  Tighten up the clutch cable until the clearance gap between the small arm and the release arm decreases to 1.0 mm.  This procedure is shown in (Figure 22).  If you have trouble meeting this distance within the range of travel of the adjusting nuts, then you might need to readjust your trunion pin on the other end of the clutch cable.  Now, check the clutch release travel.  Reinstall the floorboard over the pedal cluster.  Measure the distance that the release lever travels when the pedal is pressed (you will need an assistant for this one).  (Figure 23) shows the length that you should measure.  Take a measurement of this distance, and then have your assistant step one the clutch pedal.  Then take another measurement.  This travel, which is the result of the first measurement minus the second measurement, should be 25 mm +- 0.5 mm.  If this travel is not within this range, then adjust the floor stop on the floorboards (Figure 24) to obtain this travel distance.

Well, that's about it.  The clutch cable and helper spring are two items that seem to wear out consistently on these cars, and it is a very wise idea to replace them when you are doing a clutch job, or before you do any major clutch work.  This Pelican Technical Article was brought to you by the good people at Pelican Parts, who depend upon your business to help support this FREE and growing website.  Please make sure that you tell all your friends about the internet's largest Porsche and BMW site, and also make sure that you consider letting Pelican Parts earn your future business.  If you have any questions, concerns or (heaven forbid) any complaints, as always you can send us email, or give us a call at 1-888-280-7799. 

Click here to look at comments, suggestions, and feedback from other people who have read this article. Or, add your own feedback, and help everyone else out by learning from your experience!

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Figure 1

Foot Pedal Assembly

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Figure 2

Clutch Cable End

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Figure 3

Clutch Cable End Removed at Pedal Assy

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Figure 4

Clutch Cable Adjustment Nuts

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Figure 5

Clutch Cable End

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Figure 6

Clutch Cable Tube at Firewall

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Figure 7

Threading New Cable into Firewall

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Figure 8

Clutch Cable at Firewall

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Figure 9

Clutch Helper Spring

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Figure 10

Clutch Lever Arm Assembly

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Figure 11

Disconnect Return Spring

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Figure 12

Remove Circlip

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Figure 13

Sliding Off Clutch Arm

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Figure 14

Removing Large Clutch Lever Arm

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Figure 15

Clutch Arms Removed

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Figure 16

Helper Spring with Shaft

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Figure 17

Clutch Arm Assembly

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Figure 18

Clutch Cable Arm

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Figure 19

New Clutch Cable

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Figure 20

New Clutch Cable Installed

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Figure 21

Setting Clutch Play Clearance

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Figure 22

Tightening Clutch Cable

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Figure 23

New Clutch Cable Installed

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Comments and Suggestions:
Tommy Comments: I have a 1987 Porsche 911 Targa. It only has 70k miles. The clutch and shifting had all been working fine until the car sat for 4 months. The clutch pedal seems to be functioning properly normal feeling press and release, but it is not engaging the clutch. Everything shifts normally with engine off. The clutch is definitely engaging as the car will move when attempting to start it in gear. From reading some of your articles, I feel it is either cable or slave . I have not seen any fluid leaks, so I am leaning to cable, but it is funny how it just stopped working while it sat all of that time. Thanks for your inputs.
November 6, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: I would suspect the hydraulics before a cable. Especially after sitting., Try to bleed the system. If it comes back, replace the master and slave. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
johnnybegood Comments: I have 1988 porsche 911 carrera, I had the car up in the air on the lift, and with the emergency break off, the two back wheels do not spin freely, you can spin them by hand, but take some effort, what could be causing this, and any recommendation to fix this issue, will it hurt the car??
April 16, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: This may be the transmission holding them up. What makes you suspect the brakes? Some drag it normal. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
johnny be good Comments: I have 1988 porsche 911 carrera g50 transmission, the clutch pedal is to the floor, it will not return by its self, the car will not go into gear, the brake fluid reservoir was empty, so i filled it, any sugestions as to what I check.
April 9, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: I would assume the clutch master or slave cylinder is faulty. Start there. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
JCFL Comments: Hello sir,

My car is a 1982 911 SC, photo enclosed. It was parked for 2013 and 2014, and I recently brought it out again. With a new battery, it started almost on first crank. It has 155,000 miles on the engine, burning one quart of oil per about 2000 miles.

The transmission shifts very well in all gears. However, I find the pedal extremely hard to push.

Is it likely that my helper spring is shot ?
Even more, is it possible that previous owner removed the helper spring entirely ?

Again, I repeat that the transmission shifts very well, but the clutch pedal is very hard to press.

I should also mention that I have raised my pedal level by taping a wooden block on top of it, so that I would not have to press so far with my leg. It has worked well for me for about 4 years now.

Your comments are much appreciated, and so is your extraordinary web site. When I can, I give my business even though I am 5000 miles away in Eastern Canada.

Thanks.
May 24, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Sweet ride!!
Most likely time to replace the clutch cable.
http://www.pelicanparts.com/techarticles/911_clutch_cable/911_clutch_cable.htm
- Casey at Pelican Parts
 
911 sc Comments: Thank you Wayne and pelican for the great resources. This was yet another awesome technical article that saved me a lot of time and money.
September 19, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thanks for the feedback. Glad we could help.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
Frank Comments: Hi, Is there a clutch adustmnet on a 1990 Carrera?
Thanks Frank
September 13, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: I don't believe so, it is hydraulic. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Casper Comments: Hi,
When my 911S from 74 is idling I can't shift to 1st and reverse. When I turn of the car I can engage all gears with out problems. Does this suggest I need a new clutch or transmission?
July 5, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: COuld be the clutch. Try double clutching it, pressing the clutch two consecutive times before shifting. If it works, the clutch may be worn. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
jay Comments: Hi I was wondering if you can please help me I have a 911sc porsche 1982 and I need to take it out the transmission so I can get to my clutch and replace it.so I loosened all the bolts and disconnected evey thing but it wont come out I need help how do you do it
February 7, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Did you remove the clutch fork? - Nick at Pelican Parts  
MotoLiam Comments: Hi There; do you have a parts package for everything described above to change the clutch cable and helper spring on a 1983 911 SC, including the circlips, and "likely to be damaged during removal" pieces? I would like to order everything at once, instead of bouncing around between screens. Thanks!
December 4, 2013
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Give our parts specialists a call at 1-888-280-7799 and they can help figure out which part or repair kit you need.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
Rekoob Comments: i did the adjustment process, very helpful and well explained. however, my question is this: Why does it seem the photo of the old and new cable where attached tot he transmission are both set at the same place. should the new cable start at the beginning of the threads and progress to the end as the cable stretches?
secondly, after adjustment and even adjusting the pedal stop i still get rough shifts and gears griding in first and reverse. Time for a new cable i presume? or more adjustments anywhere?
thanks,
Booker,
October 1, 2013
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: The cables don't stretch much, usually you are making up for wear in the clutch. If you are getting grinding and hard shifting, the clutch may be worn. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Nixx_911sc Comments: In my 1983 911sc Targa... I've replaced the Clutch cable, and helper spring and followed the adjustements to the letter. BUT, I cannot get the 25mm travel on the release lever. The only way i can get even close to that distance is without the floorboard installed. What am i missing.
April 8, 2013
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: I would inspect the clutch disc and be sure it isn't worn. Also double check you have the right parts.



This portion of the article desribes the adjustment procedure:


Once you have the entire assembly installed, you are ready to adjust your clutch cable. With the cable completely disconnected, adjust the small adjustment screw, shown previously in Figure 18, until you have a clearance gap of 1.2 mm. This procedure is shown in Figure 21. Tighten up the adjusting screw with the lock nut. Now, attach the new clutch cable end (Figure 19) to the small hook on the lever arm, as previously shown in Figure 9. Tighten up the clutch cable until the clearance gap between the small arm and the release arm decreases to 1.0 mm. This procedure is shown in Figure 22. If you have trouble meeting this distance within the range of travel of the adjusting nuts, then you might need to readjust your trunion pin on the other end of the clutch cable. Now, check the clutch release travel. Reinstall the floorboard over the pedal cluster. Measure the distance that the release lever travels when the pedal is pressed (you will need an assistant for this one). Figure 23 shows the length that you should measure. Take a measurement of this distance, and then have your assistant step one the clutch pedal. Then take another measurement. This travel, which is the result of the first measurement minus the second measurement, should be 25 mm +- 0.5 mm. If this travel is not within this range, then adjust the floor stop on the floorboards (Figure 24) to obtain this travel distance.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
John Comments: Do all 915 tranny's have "helper springs"? I am having the same symptoms, hard pedal, has to go to the floor in order to disengage and not grind gears. Clutch is recent. I even replaced my cable two years ago and rebuilt the pedal cluster.
February 8, 2013
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Not all 915 transmissions have helper springs. They were introduced in 1976 with the 911 Turbo and then used on the 1978 and later 911SCs. If you have a stiff clutch and early car then you might have an issue with the clutch helper spring that is located underneath the clutch pedal and is attached to the pedal cluster. This is a very strong spring that very often breaks when it gets old. I would pull up your carpet and take a look to see if the spring is there or if it's broken. Replacement is fairly easy but you might need a helper to assist you in stretching the spring to attach it to the pedal cluster. - Wayne at Pelican Parts  
Peggy Comments: Hi Wayne. This is Peggy Spiers. I sold you some 930 parts awhile back. I have a question that I think you maybe able to help me with. I have some Clutch Release Bearing Forks that I was told fit a 911 '72-'86. However, someone else told me that this not the proper application because they do not have the splines where the shaft fits. Can you give me any suggestions? Thanks again for your help.
December 11, 2012
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Give our parts specialists a call at 1-888-280-7799. They can help sort out the application data. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Frank Falcone Comments: Nick: Thanks for the response to my question of 7/14/12. I don't believe my car has a cable, I believe its hydraulic.
Clutch is stuck in the engaged position, not sure what to do.
July 28, 2012
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Check the fluid level in the clutch master and operation of the slave cylinder. if the slave cylinder is functioning, the clutch mechanical components may be faulty.- Nick at Pelican Parts  
Frank Falcone Comments: I have a 1991 911 Carrera 2. When shifting from 1st gear to second, the transmission would not go into second gear. I got it back into first and it appeared that the clutch remained engaged and pushing the clutch pedal had no effect. I as able to drive very slowly in first gear and got the car home 1 mile. With the engine off, the car shifts smoothly. When the clutche pedal is pushed down, the transmission remains engaged. I was wondering if it's the linkage or the clutch/transmission.

Thanks
July 14, 2012
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Sounds like the clutch cable has failed. Have somebody press the clutch pedal while you monitor the clutch cable end at transmission: http://www.pelicanparts.com/techarticles/911_clutch_replace/pic13.JPG If the end at transmission isn't moving, the cable has failed.- Nick at Pelican Parts  
otto in norway Comments: I have now inspected the fork. Sure enough, it was starting to break....
So now my car will get new helper spring, cable, throw out bearing and fork. Should take care of it..!
June 27, 2012
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thanks for the feedback. Glad we could help.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
otto in norway Comments: Hi there.
I've got a '79 SC, and I've just replaced the clutch cable, thinking it was going bad. I have a bit hard pedal at the moment, but loose when I adjust the large arm to be at rest closer to the front.
This makes sense, because this is where the helper spring "springs" into action.
My problem is that it does not release the clutch properly, unless I set the distance beween the actuator arm and the large arm to 0, or even applies some pressure to the actuator.
Do I have a problem with the clutch release fork?
June 12, 2012
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Sounds like you might. if the clutch pedal and cable are good. The next place to look is the clutch fork. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Groundzero Comments: Thank you for your responses. I have checked with my local Porsche mechanic and it appears that the clutch pedal feel is correct. He thinks the tight pedal response I used to have was due to an issue the the throw out bearing before the clutch change.

Have a good new year.
January 2, 2012
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thanks for the info. Great to know. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Groundzero Comments: Would that be the case if I never opened the clutch hydrolic system? When changing the clutch I didnt disconnect the slave cynlinder. I just hung it up as technical article 37.

With the help of your 101 Projects for my Boxster book I was able to perform the Rear Main Seal, IMS, Clutch, and CV Boot projects. I also disassembled my transmission and replaced 2nd Gear and Syncro. Thank you for all of your help!
December 30, 2011
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: It may or may not be. I can't tell over the Internet. However, that is the first thing that I would recommend if the system is not working properly. When you change the clutch, you alter the geometry of how the slave interacts with the throwout arm. You need to push it back, and sometimes this causes issues that can be resolved with bleeding. Heck, bleeding is the quickest and easiest solution, so I would try that first before starting to replace items. - Wayne at Pelican Parts  
Groundzero Comments: I have a Boxster S and just replaced the clutch. Now the clutch pedal is very soft. How do I adjust it for a more stiff response?

Thanks again.
December 29, 2011
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: It probably just needs to be rebled. Check out the article on clutch hydraulics bleeding for details. - Wayne at Pelican Parts  
sharky95127 Comments: I can't tell if my spring helper is bad or not. It is hard to press down but it release normal. This is my first 911 so I am not sure this is normal, I have BMW but they don't seems to be this hard to press. I would love to replace it help me press a little lighter, I am problem with my feet arch so this is not helping. Any advice on to assess if a replacement is warranted I would be ready to roll up my sleeve. Nathan
November 14, 2011
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: If it feel as if the helper is not doing its job, assisting in pressing the clutch, I would think it is time to replace it. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Jack Comments: Greetings,
Here is a question for you. Check your figure 9. Why do we need to eat away some of the heat exchanger for the clutch spring clearance?
Jack
September 20, 2011
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: I do not think you have to remove any material during the procedure. There should b e room for it to fit. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Charles Comments: 1984 911 Carrera. I'm thinking about buying it, but when test driving it, the clutch didn't engage until the pedal was very high. I have long legs and my knee was at the steering wheel when the clutch engaged. Very difficult to control when my leg is that at angle. Owner says there's about 20,000 miles on a new clutch. I'd like it to engage earlier, closer to the floor board. Can this be adjusted?
September 17, 2011
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Try this tech article to help you with adjusting: http://www.pelicanparts.com/techarticles/101_Projects_Porsche_911/09-Clutch_Cable/09-Clutch_Cable.htm - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Gotporsche Comments: When letting the clutch out, how much travel should there be to the friction point? Should the friction point be near the end of the clutch pedal travel or should it be midway. If it is midway, does this cause any problems, ie: premature wear.
June 13, 2011
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: You want the clutch to start engaging just off the floor. 1.5 to 2 inches is a good rule of thumb. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
vando Comments: wayne,thanks for your response,i,m not sure if this tranny has a helper sring as it is an older trans from a 71.is there any pictures of what it should look like where the cable connects to the trans.i don't see any spot for a helper spring attachment
September 22, 2010
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: All bets are off if you're combining older units with a more modern car. The 1971 transmission isn't even a 915 - it's a 911 transmission with a similar pull-clutch system, but is somewhat unique to that year car (1970-71). - Wayne at Pelican Parts  
vando Comments: adding to my e-mail,checked pedal cluster,all is well,checked where cable connects to trans,nothing broken,must be inside which means my attempt to fix this myself is probably done ,right?
September 14, 2010
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: I'm guessing that the u-shaped helper spring is broken. This is a common symptom and the spring is a wear part. I would replace that spring first, and see if that fixes the problem. It also might be a sign that the clutch pressure plate is having issues. - Wayne at Pelican Parts  
vando Comments: i have a 77 911 with a 2.2 replacement motor and tranny,great driver,recently clutch pedal went to the floor,so went ahead and removed cable,doesn't seem to be snapped,moves back and forth in the tube.could it be shreaded inside where i can't see or something worse?
September 13, 2010
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: If you can pull on the cable and it does resists when holding the other end, the problem might be with the clutch itself. Put one end of the cable in a vise, then pull the other end, if it does not move, inspect the mechanical clutch components. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
87924gt Comments: She's back on the lift tonight to work on the cable again, now that I've got a better look see at the "real" adjustments I need to make.
March 22, 2010
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thanks for the follow up. We appreciate it.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
LS Dave Comments: I have a 1978 SC and am trying to remove the large arm attached to the shaft. It appears there is a pin but I am having trouble getting it out. Have tried punch and hammer with no success. Any suggestions?
November 6, 2009
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: I've had difficulty with this too. Drill it out if you can't get it out, that's how I've gotten some of these out in the past. - Wayne at Pelican Parts  
Jdub Comments: Early SC owners should look for a pin holding the arm to the shaft. Clean the assembly and look closely - also a possibility if the arm will not budge.

Consider OEM when you purchase a new spring. You REALLY want a spring with thick spring leaves - some of the repro.s have thin leaves, break, and you are back at this job again.
October 12, 2009
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thanks for the additional Info. We appreciate it.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
peter Comments: am just now attempting clutch adjustment 911s, 1977; clutch has 10k on it. although following instructions, cannot get any space between positioning lever and adjustment bolt gap should be 1.2mm.what to do?
August 27, 2009
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: I would try loosening up the clutch cable under the pedal cluster to give you more play in the cable. - Wayne at Pelican Parts  
Brian Stocking Comments: Not only was this a good article, but many other ones I have read here on Pelican Parts. Well written and well explained.
Before I start a project I'll do a quick google search on the subject and first up is Pelican parts with the answers and know-how.
I can't thank you all enough for all the support. Hats off to you!

Brian Stocking
St. Augustine, Fl
July 26, 2009
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thanks Brian, the Google search engine is indeed our friend! - Wayne at Pelican Parts  
Moony Comments: You just saved me $3000 and a bunch of craziness THANKS!!!!
May 9, 2009
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Great looking car, thanks for posting a picture! - Wayne at Pelican Parts  

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