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Pelican Technical Article:

Changing Engine Oil

Time:

1 hr

Tab:

$30

Tools:

15 or 19 mm wrench, 10mm Allen wrench on early cars, Paper Towels, Oil Pan & bucket

Applicable Models:

Porsche 911 (1965-89)
Porsche 930 Turbo (1976-89)

Parts Required:

Oil Filter, Motor Oil, Drain plug seals

Hot Tip:

Make sure that you have a big enough bucket

Performance Gain:

Prolonged engine life and reliability

Complementary Modification:

Fill with Synthetic Oil
101 Projects for Your Porsche 911

This article is one in a series that have been released in conjunction with Wayne's book, 101 Projects for Your Porsche 911. The book contains 240 pages of full color projects detailing everything from performance mods to changing your brake pads. With more than 650+ full-color glossy photos accompanying extensive step-by-step procedures, this book is required reading in any Porsche 911 owner's collection. See The Official Book Website for more details.

One of the most common tasks to perform is the replacement of your engine oil. Frequent oil changes are supposedly the most important thing that you can do to maintain and prolong the life of your engine. With the better oils that are available today, the requirement for frequent changes is diminishing. Even though Porsche now recommends oil changes every 15,000 miles or so, it's usually recommended to keep the changes under the 5000 mile limit. If you don't drive your car too often, then the changing of the oil should be done at least once a year to keep things fresh.

The first thing you need to do is to make sure that you have everything that is required for the job. Nothing is more frustrating than emptying your oil, only to find out that you don't have a replacement filter, or not enough oil. You will need an oil filter, a wrench, a roll of paper towels, a very large oil pan or bucket, and about 12 quarts of oil. Check the bottom of your oil tank for the appropriate sized wrench that you need: it's not uncommon for the older cars to have different sized drain plugs than were originally installed. Start by driving the car around, and letting it heat up to operating temperature. You want to empty your oil when it's hot, because the heat makes the oil flow a lot easier, and more particles of metal and dirt will come out when the oil is emptied.

Once you get the car parked, place the oil pan bucket underneath the oil tank of the car. The 911 uses a dry-sump system which holds the majority of the oil in the oil tank instead of at the bottom of the engine. There is still plenty of oil at the bottom of the engine, but there isn't enough for the engine to run properly, so the oil tank holds the reserve. The oil tank for all 911s (except 1972) is located on the right side of the car, inside the rear fender just behind the wheel. At the bottom of the tank there is a plug that is used for draining oil. Remove this plug carefully, and make sure that you have a very large oil pan underneath. The oil pan should be capable of holding about nine quarts of oil. Place a drip pan underneath in case you underestimate. The oil will be very hot, and will empty out extremely quickly, so be careful not to burn yourself. There will be no time to grab any more buckets or oil pans, so make sure that the one you choose is big enough.

Now is a good time to remove the oil filter. You want to make sure that you remove the filter with the oil pan still underneath the oil tank because the oil filter is full of oil, and this oil will have a tendency to drip down out of the filter into the tank and out the drain hole. The filter should only be on finger tight, but you may need a filter wrench to remove it. If the filter is really on tight, you may need to resort to more drastic measures. One sure-fired way to get the oil filter off is to poke a hole in one side of it and out the other with a long screwdriver. Using the handle of the screwdriver gives you the leverage that you need to remove the filter. It doesn't matter that you are destroying the filter, because you are going to be installing a new one. Be aware though, that this method will leak oil out of the filter into your engine compartment, so have some paper towels handy.

After the oil tank is empty, proceed to the center of the bottom of the engine, where you will find a similar plug on the bottom of the engine. In a similar manner to the oil tank, remove this plug, and empty the oil into your oil pan. The bottom of the engine sump will contain significantly less oil than in the oil in the tank. Starting in late 1983, Porsche moved the location of this drain plug from the bottom of the engine to the side of the case.

While all of your oil is draining, take the two plugs from the engine and the tank, and carefully clean them with a paper towel. The plug at the bottom of the engine is magnetic, and attracts all the little bits and pieces of metal that get trapped in the engine oil. Sometimes the plug on the bottom of the oil tank is magnetic as well, depending upon whether it has been previously replaced. When both plugs are clean, replace them in the car and make sure that you install new metal gaskets around the plugs. If you don't use the gasket, they will leak oil. Torque the two plugs to spec.

Now head back into the engine compartment, and install the new oil filter. Install the oil filter with the seal wet: wipe a small bit of oil on a paper towel, and use it to make sure there is oil on the seal all the way around the filter. Screw on the filter and make it snug tight. No need to use the iron grip of death when tightening the oil filter: these don't have a tendency to leak.

Now it's time to fill up your 911 with motor oil. A lot of people aren't really sure what motor oil to use in their car. Traditionally, the characteristics of motor oil were linked closely to their weight. Heavier weight oils protect well against heat. Lighter weight oils flow better in engines in cold environments. In general, if you live in a cold climate, you should use a 10W-40 or similar oil. This oil is a 10 weight oil that behaves and protects against heat like a 40 weight oil. In warmer climates, you should use a 20W-50 oil. This oil doesn't flow as well at the colder climates, but gives an extra âedge' on the hotter end.

The question of whether to use synthetic or âdinosaur' oil often comes up amongst car buffs. Consumer Reports (July 1996) did an extensive test a few years ago on both types of oil, and after tearing apart engines, and measuring wear, they couldn't find any discernable differences between the two. Still some people swear by synthetic oil. In general, you should not use the synthetic oil if you have an older car with old seals in the engine. There have been many documented cases where the addition of synthetic oil has caused an otherwise dry car to start leaking. If you own an older 911 that doesn't have fresh seals in the engine, I would stick to the non-synthetics.

Fill your oil tank from the oil filler neck in the engine compartment. I recommend removing the oil dipstick so that you don't pour oil all over the end that you need to hold. Add about eight quarts to the oil tank, and add an extra quart if you have a 1973 and later 911. Put the dip stick back in, and the oil cap back on.

Now, take the car out for a drive and bring it up to operating temperature. The oil level can only be checked with the engine running at idle and at operating temperature. If the oil level is low, then add more oil while the engine is running. One to two quarts of oil added to the tank will make the oil level on the dipstick rise from the low mark to the high mark. One rule of thumb is to fill the oil tank until the dashboard gauge reads just above it's half-way point. Make sure that you double-check the dipstick when you are finished. If you add too much oil, then the oil will eventually find it's way into the breather hoses, and could make a mess of your engine compartment. Make sure that you dispose of your old oil at a respectable recycling station.

On all 911s, the oil filter is attached to the oil tank.
Figure 1

On all 911s, the oil filter is attached to the oil tank. Be sure to arm yourself with paper towels, as it is almost impossible to avoid spilling at least some oil when removing the filter. The oil tanks on all 911s are located in the rear of the car inside the right rear fender, except for 1972 cars, when they were located towards the front of the car. The oil filler neck is also shown in this photo. The dipstick for measuring oil level is contained in a slot inside the filler neck.

Make sure that you plan to have a very large container below the oil tank.
Figure 2

Make sure that you plan to have a very large container below the oil tank. Approximately 4-6 quarts of oil or more will empty out of the tank very quickly. It's also wise to have a drip pan underneath your container. It's very easy to underestimate the amount of oil that will empty out of the tank.

Approximately three to four quarts of oil will empty out of the bottom of the engine.
Figure 3

Approximately three to four quarts of oil will empty out of the bottom of the engine. Although not necessary during each oil change, removal and cleaning of the sump screen on 1965-83 911s can help keep your engine oil cleaner. Remove the eight nuts that hold the sump plate on and clean the screen carefully. If you notice bits and pieces of metal or other debris in the screen, it may be a sign that it's time for you to rebuild your engine. Make sure that when you reinstall the screen, don't place the drain plug under the oil pickup tube: it can interfere with the oil pickup and circulation.

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Comments and Suggestions:
Nichole Comments: I drained the oil from my 1981 911SC in preparation to drop the engine and transmission. More oil seemed to drain from the engine than the reserve tank. Could this be because the car has sat parked in the garage for several months now? I was unable to start or drive the car to heat the oil. I am curious if this is an issue, or if I should expect an oil mess when removing oil lines and dropping the engine.
November 29, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: The engine usually doesn't have a lot of oil when off. The tank holds most, the engine sucking it in once started. let the drain plugs sit out for a bit, if all oil drains, you should not have a mess. Other than what may be left in the lines. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Jodi Comments: I recently had a new oil cooler, and oil lines, installed in my 1982 Porsche Targa 911. Yesterday I ran the car for about 15 minutes and noticed that there was a bit of smoke coming out of the passenger side, rear wheel well area. I felt the exterior of the wheel well, and the portion of the bumper near that wheel well, and it had became very hot to the touch. This has never happened before. Could this be because of the new oil cooler? If so, what to look for??
October 11, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: The smoke may have been from residual oil.

Was oil temp normal?
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
portia Comments: My 2.2 dipstick has only a max line. There is one of the bent half circles about an inch below the line. My mechanic has me paranoid about overfilling.
September 15, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Fill to MAX, follow instructions in the owner's manual for checking level. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Ron Comments: good morning , 1989 - 911 turbo bottom valve cover . Do I need to install gasket between cover and engine even if I use LOCTITE 574 thank you
August 28, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Yes. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Arnie Comments: The Bentley book has a oil drain plug torque of 51 ft lbs while the Pelican Tech Info states 31 ft lbs. Which is right?
August 3, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: You didn't mention what vehicle you have so I can;t check if I have that info. I would go with Bentley's for now. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Bob Comments: I was having an issue with my 1973 911T, as someone else described in another Pelican thread. Oil pressure dropping and the car stalling on deceleration with the alternator light coming on. One recommendation here was to use a heavier non synthetic oil for summer driving. It has been awhile since I changed the oil. So I followed all of these directions. Went smoothly. Added 8.5 quarts of 20 W 50. Took it for a spirited drive. Temp got to 220-230. Oil guage just above red and pressure seemed low. Certainly well below 80 psi at 4500-5550 RPMs. Brought it back and let it idle on a flat pad. Dipstick registers no oil. I added another 1/2 quart and repeated. Still no oil registers. Also smoking more than I recall. Is it possible that this car needs more than 9 quarts of oil? I am concerted about adding too much. Also, does the oil pressure have anything to do with the alternator light/stalling? Batteries should be good and kept on a trickle charge.
July 11, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: If the engine is stalling or RPM drops too low, the alternator light and oil pressure will drop. Your issue may be related to the engine stalling issue. I would address that item first.

Your engine may not have enough oil in it from what you describe, if smoking, it is burning it. - Nick at Pelican Parts
 
MinusF117 Comments: Can I just say....once you get that sump bolt loosened....holy cow. Be READY! I was not prepared. It's like Niagara. Just a heads up for everyone.
June 28, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Agreed. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
JCFL Comments: Excuse me for the stupid question - I am planning to do an oil change and valves adjustment in one 24 hrs period. I do not remember if I should do the adjustment first, or the oil change first ? Thanks for your reply and for the excellent service at Pelican !
April 23, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Save the oil change for last. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Mark Comments: I cannot, for the life of me, remove the oil filler tube cover. I can turn it and press down and turn it... but it won't come off. Help!
March 15, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: What vehicle? You may be missing the slots for the releasing points by a small amount.- Nick at Pelican Parts  
RERL Comments: I have 911 Targa 1975, when i try to remove oil tank lid to check level, engine stops.. this is the same issue mention in the forum with a 84 Carrera?
March 12, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: There is a hose under the oil tank cap that has a brass cone that restricts airflow to the engine when the cap is removed. Yours may be missing.

You could also have a vacuum leak. - Nick at Pelican Parts
 
buckeye nut Comments: how, many qrts motor oil does 1987 mercede benz take
February 28, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: What model and engine? - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Ronny Comments: I can't check my oil level. When I take the lid off the oil tank at idle, the engine stops. 1984 Carrera coupe.
December 5, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: There is a hose under the oil tank cap that has a brass cone that restricts airflow to the engine when the cap is removed. Yours may be missing.

You could also have a vacuum leak.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
Larry Comments: When replacing the large round gaskets on the strainer, is it normal or necessary to put any sealant on the gaskets? I've always been told to avoid putting silicon seal anywhere on a engine as it might get in the oil system.
October 15, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: No sealant is needed. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Chris Comments: Nick, I don't think you understand the problem. With the car running there is a constant flow of oil slashing in the top of the oil tank and the top of the dipstick. This may be unique to the 1972 model. Not only is the oil hot, which burns ones fingers trying to get the dipstick out, but there is a constant flow of oil running down the dipstick, which makes checking the level impossible. The only way I see that the level could be checked is with the engine not running.
July 9, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: If the oil is splashing around that bad, engine RPM is too high. Check for causes of high engine rpm. Once you lower it, the oil level will be easier to check with the engine running.- Nick at Pelican Parts  
Chris Comments: I have 1972 911T. The owner's manual says check the oil with the engine idling. The dipstick is in the top of the oil tank. With the engine running oil is splashing all mover the dipstick, and it is impossible to check the level.
July 4, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: It should be checked with the engine running, warm engine, on level ground. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Rene Comments: Hi! I have a 911 3.0 1977, I changed oil but I have problems adjusting oil level. I used 12 qtrs, the gauge level indicador mark empty and using the dipstick marks the minimum. I follow the instructions, I mean checking the level with the engine running at idle and at operating temprerature. If I add more oil causes smog because the oil excess... Colud you help me?
June 17, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: I usually like to drive the car hard and recheck if the amount you put in doesn't add up with what is on the dipstick. Sometimes the thermostat doesn't fully open when the car is idling, a quick spirited drive should bring the level up on the stick. - Casey at Pelican Parts  
911 Joe Comments: I just change the oil in my 85 911 Carrera. Both the oil level gauge and the pressure gauge are stuck ion the high mark when the car is running - any ideas on what the problem could be?
June 11, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Could it be overfilled with oil? If you turn the ignition on but don't start the car, do the gauges still read high? - Casey at Pelican Parts  
Havolas Comments: My sump plate doesn't have a drain plug. Do I just remove the 8 bolts and drain the rest that way? Why would my '77 911 not have a drain plug here? This also appears to be the location of a considerable amount of leaking. Should I replace the sump plate with one with a drain plug?
March 16, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Can you share a photo of the area of the leak? I can better advise of what you may need. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
1-ev.com Comments: Just wanted to link Great Pelican Article here http://www.pelicanparts.com/techarticles/mult_gas_and_oil/mult_oil_article.htm
February 27, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thanks for the Info. We appreciate it.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
89 Silver Anniversary Comments: I have a 1989 Cabriolet with a whale tail. The whale tail has a oil cooler built into it. Do I need to add more oil than the usual? Also what do you think of the dinasor/synthetic blend oil?
February 13, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: I imagine you will need to add more oil. It all depends on how much is drained. I would drain, then measure what comes out. I also prefer full synthetic. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
MikeN426 Comments: What's the torque spec for the 8 plate sump nuts?
January 18, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: I don't have that info handy.
I would grab a repair manual. It will have the procedure, special tools and torque specs.

Give our parts specialists a call at 1-888-280-7799. - Nick at Pelican Parts
 
Balloonmeister Comments: Is it OK to change the weight of motor oil, e.g., use 20W50 during the summer and 10W40 during the winter I live in Albuquerque, NM? I change the oil and filter every December and June.
November 26, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Personally, I would stick with whatever your owner's manual states for the climate you are in. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Steve Comments: 1975 911s targa , 3000 rpm 30 psi with 210 temp , just got it running after 11 years of storage should I be alright with these no.s after a 20 minute test drive ?
November 9, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: I feel like it should be a lot higher. Closer to 73, which is the Porsche spec (going by memory). - Nick at Pelican Parts  
mike Comments: any others out there have trouble removing sump cover on '68 912? Mine seems stuck and the washers seem like they are stuck as well, not allowing me to remove the sump cover. I've removed it in the past with no problem?

thanks
October 4, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: I have not.

I opened a post in our forums. A Pelican community member may be able to answer your question.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
John Comments: I have a 1988 911, I had the engine out for about a year to replace clutch, etc, reinstalled engine this week and cannot get oil pressure gauge to work or oil idiot light to go off. I checked oil line from front left pumpto front cooler,oil comes out when you crank engine, same for oil sending unit on back right of the engine, but no pressure???
August 26, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Check if the wires have voltage on them, if not, they may have been damaged when the engine was installed. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
JJ Comments: I forgot to mention that the oil filter or the area just under it is also dry. Is there any way overfilling the oil tank can cause it to leak?
August 3, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Sure, if it id overfull, it can leak. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
JJ Comments: I just changed the oil and filter of my 1973 911E. There was no leak before at all incredible as it sounds but now there seems to be a steady leak. It isn't coming from either drain plug so it doesn't seem like I did anything wrong directly. Of course, I used new a washer for the plug. I do notice that the oil level is a little over max running engine at temperature even after a week of leaking. Could overfilling oil cause a leak? There is no smoke or any other symptoms.
August 1, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Check the oil filter, I would suspect that is the issue if the drain plug is dry. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
steve320ise Comments: 911 1985, the car has been off the road for about 5 years with the oil tank off , also cooler and pipes what is the best way to fill up with oil and star the engine, cheers Steve
June 25, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Fill it like you would when changing the oil. Before starting it, disable the fuel pump and crank the engine a few times to build oil pressure. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Lashmc Comments: I have an '83 911 3.0 SC. You recommend cleaning the oil screen behind the sump plate during oil changes. Is there a gasket or seal on the sump plate that will need to be replaced ?
March 17, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: If I remember correctly, yes a seal is present. Give our parts specialists a call at 1-888-280-7799. They can help you find the right part.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
italo Comments: hello out there,can anyone help just wondering i have a 1967 porsche 911 ,would there be any oil indication or oil on the dip stick when the car is not running,

regargs luis

February 21, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: You want to have the engine warm and switched OFF. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
DanPez Comments: Thanks for this valuable information. I was wondering if someone can help me out on this. I have a 73 911 Sportomatic so decided to use mineral instead of synthetic mainly for the fear of oil leakage. The oil previously used was Swepco 306 20-50W. Here in Canada, as one reader mentioned, they are not typically shelf items. Looking at the workshop manual the manufacturers recommends 30W for summer use. I found a distributor 40 miles away that has Brad Penn SAE 30 High Performance oil. Not the Break-in type
How can I completely flush the old oil? Note: I also have the oil going in the torque converter
I don't want to go crazy with this but is there a simple method?
September 22, 2013
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: If your vehicle has an external cooler, you can have a shop with a transmission flush machine, flush all the old out using the cooler lines while filling it with the new fluid. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
motts911 Comments: Thank you Nick for your help regarding proper torque measurements, and I do enjoy this site...thanks again...
September 12, 2013
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thanks for the feedback. Glad we could help. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Motts 911 Comments: What does 42 N-m equal in pounds of torque when tightening drain plugs? Thx...
September 11, 2013
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: 30.9 ft-lbs - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Ken Comments: Thank you for the advice on how to change the oil in my 1975 911s. You saved me hundreds of dollars. Great tips too.
August 10, 2013
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thanks for the kudos - Kerry at Pelican Parts  
Hal Comments: I found minute particals total mass less than one half of the head of a stright pin of metal on my magnetic drain plug. Is some presence of metal particals common or should I be concerned?
May 12, 2013
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: A small amount of metal particles are okay if you just did a rebuild. Otherwise you may want to check you oil pressure and verify you have adequate lubrication to your bearing surfaces. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
donagain1 Comments: I too am curious about the oil which may be remaining in the front cooler tubing and/or the long hoses beeding it. I suppose that it may be a non-issue, in that it wasn't mentioned by the expert who wrote this procedure, but with a roadtrip to hellishly hot Phoenix in my future, i sure would like to know that a circulation affecting air bubble or gunky sludge hasn't built up somewhere.
May 10, 2012
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: You do not have to drain the oil cooler or lines. Just drain your engine oil, refill with the correct amount. Idle engine until warm. Then check oil level and top up if needed.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
Kissov356 Comments: What about the oil in the front cooler and the lines that go to and return from it?
April 3, 2012
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: You do not have to drain the oil cooler or lines. Just drain your engine oil, refill with the correct amount. Idle engine until warm. Then check oil level and top up if needed.

- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
Patio Comments: By the way that was not the Swepco Supreme that Pelican sells a great choice btw rather it was a generic shelf brand in Canada, sorry for the mis spelled words - week 2 with an iPad,
March 31, 2012
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thanks for the correction - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Patio Comments: Actually the synthetics are well established as providing superior protection throughout all viscosity ranges. The reason for the persistent mythology around seal shrink is that in early years the group 3 and group 4 base Oils for synthetics lacked the high wax content that kept seals in great condition. Those same waxes crystallize and gel the oil at cold temps where the synthetics are far superior. The adition of diesters in synthetic oils has long since taken care of that problem. Diesters break down with water however so a coolent leak on a synthetic oil run vehicle can amplify problems and may be why some of the "seal breakdown" legend persist.
Since few of us revev this northern -Alberta driverwill run our baby at below -10 the need for synthetic oil is a tough sell. The additive package in a high quality group 2 or 3 base oil becomes more critical than the synthetic vs mineral argument. Keep in mind a synthetic oil is simply a severely "hydro cracked" base oil -a man made oil because it does not exist in nature.There are some specialty oils that replicate original design spec additive oils but they are not a typical shelf item at least not in Canada. At least one local has destroyed an engine. Running an API SN product supreme 20W50 they have too little anti wear additive for the older 911's. One product recommended but our lube tech dept and it is a competitor so I took the reco seriously, was Penrite. Always check against OEM reps though. At day's end we should be aware that the great advances in lube oil development were occurring as our cars rolled off the production lines the last 30 -40 yearsn . This is likelythe reason for such diverse opinion and confusion on the topic, By the way that was not the Swepco Supreme that Pelican sells a great choice btw rather it was a generic shelf brand in Canada, sorry for the mis spelled words - week 2 with an iPad,
March 31, 2012
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thanks for the info. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
saredsox Comments: thanks for the great advice
March 20, 2012
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: No problem. Glad to help. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Curt Comments: The "Click here to order" link doesn't work on this page: http://www.pelicanparts.com/techarticles/101_Projects_Porsche_911/02-Oil_Change/02-Oil_Change.htm
December 3, 2011
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thank you for the heads-up. We are still building these pages and hope to have them up soon. - Scott at Pelican Parts  

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