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HomeAccessories > Car Care > Meguiar's Car Care > Meguiar's Testimonials
Meguiar's Q&A
Page 1

You Have Questions...Meguiar's Has Answers!

There is too much confusion about the right way to care for your car's appearance. By selecting one of the questions below, you'll get honest tips that should help dispel the many myths and lies that have been spread around over the years. If there's a question we haven't answered, e-mail Meguiar's today.

Why does Meguiar’s have so many products?
Combine the many materials found in today's automobile with the wide range of environmental hazards to which they're exposed, and it takes a broad spectrum of surface care solutions to treat them all. Just as a master mechanic's tool chest holds many subtly different types of wrenches, screwdrivers and other items, Meguiar's provides a comprehensive range of products to optimally satisfy every surface care need. Whether it's for paint, plastic, rubber or metal, and whether it's for easy hand application by the average consumer or for use by a highly trained professional detailer with a rotary buffer, Meguiar's extensive family has precisely the right answer for the job.


What products should I use?
The best combination of surface care products for your car depends on a number of factors such as your vehicle's condition, environmental exposure, local climate conditions and your own appearance goals. Meguiar's exclusive online Paint Care Rx will instantly create a free, customized recommendation for you. And if you own a boat or personal watercraft, our Marine Rx can help with that, too.


What causes swirl marks?
Swirl marks are actually microscopic scratches in the finish. These are often caused by the use of a buffer with the wrong type of polishing pad and/or wax/polish. Automatic car washes also can cause swirls, especially on clear coat paints. Another culprit is hand application or removal of product using a harsh material, or pads and cloths that have picked up micro abrasives from falling on the ground or improper storage. To avoid swirls, thoroughly wash all dirt particles from your finish before applying polish or wax. And always use a 100% terry cloth towel, because its nap draws any contaminants on the surface up into the towel instead of letting them scratch the sensitive paint. Visit Barry Meguiar's Swirl Marks Clinic to learn even more.


How do I remove swirl marks?
If you have light swirls, swirl removers such as ScratchX or Mirror Glaze Swirl Remover will help safely restore your finish. Moderate to deep swirls, however, will probably require a safe paint surface prep, followed by a pure polish and then a protective wax. If this process won't remove the swirl marks, you will need to take your car to a local professional who can determine whether the scratches are so deep that painting or other work is needed.


What is clear coat paint?
Today, over 90% of all factory finishes are clear coated. A clear coat finish is a multi-layer paint system comprised of a primer, a base coat (the pigment color of your car), and a clear coat. Although a clear coat does protect the base coat, it is very sensitive to scratches and swirl marks because it is clear, unpigmented layer and light reflects through it. Clear coat paints require special care and should never be treated with harsh abrasive waxes or rubbing compounds, unless you are a experienced detailer using the proper equipment.


Do I have clear coat paint?
An easy way to tell whether you have clear coat paint is to look at your applicator when applying a surface prep or wax. If you see the color of your car on your applicator, you do not have a clear coat.


Can a clear coat oxidize?
Most modern car finishes consist of a base coating that contains the color, topped with a protective clear coat that is designed to keep the pigmented paint from oxidizing. This outer clear coat adds UV protection that helps prevent the sun's rays from drying out the base paint. Oxidation was an obvious problem ten years ago because you quickly saw the color fade. Now that the outer layer is usually clear, oxidation is less obvious, yet it still occurs. The sun dries out top paint layers and natural oils are lost. If these oils aren't replaced, the paint oxidizes and the surface gradually becomes duller and duller.

Even more than yesterday's paints, today's clear coat finishes look faded whenever the surface becomes contaminated by airborne pollution, acid rain, industrial fallout, and countless other factors. If the contamination isn't removed frequently, it reduces the reflective quality of the finish until it looks dull and lifeless. If the contamination is left on the car for some time, it can begin to etch into the thin clear coat paint layer and expose the base coat to direct UV rays and even greater damage.

Once the clear coat protection is gone the car usually requires costly repainting.


Can a clear coat fade?
Most modern car finishes consist of a base coating that contains the color, topped with a protective clear coat that is designed to keep the pigmented paint from oxidizing. This outer clear coat adds UV protection that helps prevent the sun's rays from drying out the base paint. Oxidation was an obvious problem ten years ago because you quickly saw the color fade. Now that the outer layer is usually clear, oxidation is less obvious, yet it still occurs. The sun dries out top paint layers and natural oils are lost. If these oils aren't replaced, the paint oxidizes and the surface gradually becomes duller and duller.

Even more than yesterday's paints, today's clear coat finishes look faded whenever the surface becomes contaminated by airborne pollution, acid rain, industrial fallout, and countless other factors. If the contamination isn't removed frequently, it reduces the reflective quality of the finish until it looks dull and lifeless. If the contamination is left on the car for some time, it can begin to etch into the thin clear coat paint layer and expose the base coat to direct UV rays and even greater damage.

Once the clear coat protection is gone the car usually requires costly repainting.


Can a clear coat get dull?
Most modern car finishes consist of a base coating that contains the color, topped with a protective clear coat that is designed to keep the pigmented paint from oxidizing. This outer clear coat adds UV protection that helps prevent the sun's rays from drying out the base paint. Oxidation was an obvious problem ten years ago because you quickly saw the color fade. Now that the outer layer is usually clear, oxidation is less obvious, yet it still occurs. The sun dries out top paint layers and natural oils are lost. If these oils aren't replaced, the paint oxidizes and the surface gradually becomes duller and duller.

Even more than yesterday's paints, today's clear coat finishes look faded whenever the surface becomes contaminated by airborne pollution, acid rain, industrial fallout, and countless other factors. If the contamination isn't removed frequently, it reduces the reflective quality of the finish until it looks dull and lifeless. If the contamination is left on the car for some time, it can begin to etch into the thin clear coat paint layer and expose the base coat to direct UV rays and even greater damage.

Once the clear coat protection is gone the car usually requires costly repainting.


How can I prevent oxidation?
(fading, dulling)
Protect your finish by waxing at least 3-4 times a year.
Meguiar's Protection
Remove embedded contamination by applying a surface prep once a year. ScratchX
Whenever possible park under cover.
Use a car cover to shield against airborne contamination and UV.


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