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Home > Technical Articles > Concours Corner: The Basics: Washing Your Car

Guest Technical Article
Concours Corner:
The Basics: Washing
Your Car


Bev Frohm
bev@pelicanparts.com

Intro by Wayne:

     DriveWerks is excited to announce a new series of technical articles written by long-time friend Beverly Frohm.   A winner of many concours events, Bev's insight into making your car look and feel pristine can be applied to your own car, whether it's a concours winner, or a work in progress.


     A couple people tugged at my arm to write a monthly tid-bit on Concours preparation. I’ll be honest, I did not feel like I was an expert to impart valuable information, but they convinced me I did know a thing or two about prepare your car for a show.

     This first article will deal with the basics, washing the baby.

     When I wash Bevees, I do it one of two ways. The first way is to use plain water. This is the preferred method if the car has just been sitting in the garage and collecting dust. I use a wash mitt that I throw in the washing machine between car cleaning gigs. I do not use a chamois, some people prefer them, but I have found they trap fine particles of dirt in the pores. This can cause small scratches in the paint. I learned this at a tech session at McGuires one rainy afternoon, boy was I shocked, we have all been raised on the powers of the Chamois. I then dry the car with good 100% cotton terry towels. Make sure the towels have been washed once and do not use a rinse of softener on them. The rinse is an additive that can cause streaks, and retards absorbency of the towel. Using a rinse is not detrimental by any means, just a nuisance you learn to avoid.

     If I have been using my 911 for tours, rallies or in the rain there is usually some road grime. I use a small amount of car wash soap to get the grime off. It is advisable not to use regular detergent. Detergent takes the wax off the car, this is because wax is a specialized form of grease (ugly name but basic fact). Regular detergents are developed to cut grease – therefore bye-bye wax. Car wash soaps are very mild and specially formulated not to take the wax off your cars surfaces. A good thing to remember for any automobile you are washing, whether it be your Porsche, Jag, Chevy or SUV.

     When you wash your Porsche, make sure you get the valance, running boards and under the rear bumpers. These areas actually collect more dirt than any other place on your Porsche – unless of course you’ve been parked at the beach with a group of mischievous seagulls using your precious Porsche for target practice.

     Rinse the surfaces thoroughly with a hose and immediately start drying the surfaces off. It is best to do this in an area out of the sun. I usually pull the car into the garage and dry her off in there. The reason to pull the car out of the sun it to keep those nasty little water spots from adhering to the paint. They are ugly and a nuisance to get rid of.

     When drying your Porsche don’t forget to use those 100% cotton terry towels, keep a few of them available. Once one towel gets damp, get another one until that one gets damp. If you find one of those nasty little water spots, use one of the damp (not wet) towels to rub it gently out. Don’t forget the valance, running boards etc.. It is easy to forget these and you want to make sure you don’t have a beautiful sparkling top and anything below the doors is spotty and streaked.

Bev Frohm
bev@pelicanparts.com


Bev Frohm is the owner of 'Bevees, a European 1970 911T that has won many concours events in the Southern California regions of PCA.  Her car was chosen by PCNA to represent the 1970 911T at Porsche's 50th Anniversary at Monterey.  Bev is also the web site coordinator for the Orange Coast PCA Region.

More info from the author herself:

I have been involved with PCA since 1978. I first started out racing the 911 in Autocrosses and progressed to Time Trialing. In 1982 I started running TSD Rallies with Tom using the 911 and ran one Starlight Rally with the car. We started the restoration project on the car in 1985, the project took 5 years to complete as we did 80% of the work ourselves.

After the 911’s restoration was complete I decided to show the car in the Concours Series. I attended my first Concours in 1993 to get an idea of what I was in for. Lars was not really interested in the QTip contest, so I would prepare the car myself for each of the Concours I attended. In 1994 I attended all 9 Concours events and came out as 1st in my class overall at the end of the year. In 1995, 1996 I had the same results and really enjoyed competing against such great automobiles.

In 1995 I won my class in the Parade Concours in Portland. The car did so well that if they had an overall award for street driven cars, I would have taken that as well. We had the same results in 1996 in Oklahoma. At this years Parade the 911 came in 2nd place to some very stiff competition. Tom Changs 73 911S and a Zone 7 car the is the top champion for their series. took first and third respectively.

The 911 has over 380,000 miles on it. The car is driven regularly and has to be maintained all the time. The engine had a top level rebuild at 280,000 when we did the restoration. It has been a fantastic car and really gone the distance. We were honored in Oklahoma to have the Porsche family come over and ask to see the 911. They had heard it was a very high mileage car that was also a show stopper.

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