Parts Catalog Accessories Catalog Tech Info Tech Forums
 
Follow Pelican Parts on Facebook Follow Pelican Parts on Twitter Follow Pelican Parts on Instagram Follow Pelican Parts on YouTube Follow Pelican Parts on Pinterest Follow Pelican Parts on Tumblr
  Search our site:    
View Recent Cars  |   Cart  | Project List | Order Status | Help    
 >  >
BMW E39 Coolant Valley Pan Removal
 
Bookmark and Share

Pelican Technical Article:

BMW E39 Coolant Valley Pan Removal

Kerry Jonsson

Time:

5 hours5 hrs

Tab:

$200

Talent:

*****

Tools:

10mm socket with ratchet, pick

Applicable Models:

BMW 540i Sedan/Wagon (1997-03)

Parts Required:

engine coolant, rear coolant manifold, coolant pipes

Hot Tip:

Drain coolant from block before removing parts

Performance Gain:

Repair leaking coolant manifold, pipes and valley pan

Complementary Modification:

Change intake manifold gaskets and knock sensors at the same time

The BMW cooling system on their 8-cylinder engine uses cooling pipes underneath the intake manifold to return coolant from the back of the block. This involves a manifold and two cooling pipes leading from the rear coolant manifold to the water pump. Below these coolant pipes is a coolant passage in the valley of the block. A valley pan covers this cooling passage. The valley pan can develop a leak. Coolant will fill the area under the intake manifold around the area of the valley pan. There are two drain holes at the back of the valley area allowing coolant to drain in between the engine and transmission. If you see a coolant leak at the back of engine suspect a leak from either the rear coolant manifold or the valley pan. You can replace the valley pan by removing the water pump and not removing the rear coolant manifold. See our technical article on water pump removal to start the process that way.

To perform these repairs you will need to remove the intake manifold to gain access to the component s and fasteners that need to be removed. See our tech article on intake manifold removal and follow these steps once the intake manifold is removed.

Here we are looking at the V of the block with the intake manifold removed.
Figure 1

Here we are looking at the V of the block with the intake manifold removed. To access the valley pan you will need to remove the cooling pipes (green arrows). You can remove either the water pump or the rear cooling manifold to remove the cooling pipes. In this tech article we are showing the rear manifold being removed. You can remove the water pump and follow this procedure from there. See our tech article on water pump removal.

At the back of the engine loosen and remove the hose clamps (green arrows) and heater hoses from the rear coolant manifold.
Figure 2

At the back of the engine loosen and remove the hose clamps (green arrows) and heater hoses from the rear coolant manifold.

Here we are at the back of the left side head looking at the rear cooling manifold.
Figure 3

Here we are at the back of the left side head looking at the rear cooling manifold. Remove the three 10mm fasteners (green arrows). One bolt is hidden from view (yellow arrow) behind the rear cooling manifold.

Moving to the back of the right side head remove the three 10mm fasteners (green arrows) that hold the rear cooling manifold to the cylinder head.
Figure 4

Moving to the back of the right side head remove the three 10mm fasteners (green arrows) that hold the rear cooling manifold to the cylinder head. One 10mm fasteners is hidden (yellow arrow) behind the manifold.

With all the fasteners removed remove the rear cooling manifold by moving it in the direction of the blue arrows.
Figure 5

With all the fasteners removed remove the rear cooling manifold by moving it in the direction of the blue arrows.

Use a pick to lever out the O-rings for the cooling pipes.
Figure 6

Use a pick to lever out the O-rings for the cooling pipes. You should replace these O-rings while you have the pipes out.

If you have not removed the water pump remove the smaller cooling pipe from the water pump by moving it in the direction of the blue arrow.
Figure 7

If you have not removed the water pump remove the smaller cooling pipe from the water pump by moving it in the direction of the blue arrow.

Remove the larger cooling pipe from the water pump by moving it in the direction of the blue arrow.
Figure 8

Remove the larger cooling pipe from the water pump by moving it in the direction of the blue arrow.

Remove the four 13mm fasteners (green arrows) that hold the knock sensors to the valley of the block.
Figure 9

Remove the four 13mm fasteners (green arrows) that hold the knock sensors to the valley of the block. Now would be a good time to replace the knock sensors. Knock sensors generate a signal voltage if specific vibration frequencies are caused by engine knock. The DME control unit reads these signals and retards timing if necessary. It is very important that these knock sensor are tightened down to the proper torque so they pick up the correct vibration frequencies.

Remove the twenty 10mm fasteners that hold the valley pan to the block of the engine.
Figure 10

Remove the twenty 10mm fasteners that hold the valley pan to the block of the engine.

Look at the back of the block for the two weep holes (green arrows) where coolant will leak through and run down the back of the block.
Figure 11

Look at the back of the block for the two weep holes (green arrows) where coolant will leak through and run down the back of the block. Clean out these holes.

Lift up the valley pan from the opening in the block and remove it.
Figure 12

Lift up the valley pan from the opening in the block and remove it.

Prepare for installation by cleaning the sealing surface (red arrow) and removing any debris.
Figure 13

Prepare for installation by cleaning the sealing surface (red arrow) and removing any debris. Installation is the reverse of the removal steps. Fit the new valley pan and tighten the mounting bolts. Install the knock sensors and torque down the mounting bolts. Fit the cooling pipes and install the rear manifold to hold the pipes in place. Install the rear cooling manifold gaskets and tighten the rear cooling manifold to the back of the cylinder heads. Install all components removed to access the cooling pipes and valley pans. Torque: Valley pan to engine 10 Nm (89 in ÂÂ-lb). Knock sensor 20 Nm (14.7 ft-lb)

Bookmark and Share
Comments and Suggestions:
2nd3series Comments: Another thought. Do NOT remove the rear coolant manifold, remove the water pump, so you can remove the two coolant pipes over the valley pan. At least if you break a stud on the water pump side you can get to the broken stud. Note, I love Pelican Parts and all of your technical articles. Pelican may wish to revise this E39 valley pan article http://www.pelicanparts.com/BMW/techarticles/BMW-5-Series-E39/92-ENGINE-Coolant_Valley_Pan_Removal/92-ENGINE-Coolant_Valley_Pan_Removal.htm and suggest to remove the water pump NOT the rear coolant manifold. Again, if a water pump stud breaks, at least we can get to it.
January 19, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thanks for the feedback. Removing the water pump is a good way to get the pipes out. We will add some info regarding using that method.- Nick at Pelican Parts  
2nd3series Comments: Follow-up question. I have tried to drill out the broken manifold bolt via a titanium bit and can not make a dent in the bolt? Unfortunately, puling the engine of my 540i is not worth the expense. So assuming I get 5 of 6 bolts holding the rear intake manifold in place, is Permatex radiator & fuel tank repair the best option to cover the area where the bolt is missing ? I assume Permatex radiator & fuel tank repair will work on the aluminum coolant manifold ?
January 13, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: The only option is to remove the bolt and replace it. Otherwise you will have a leak. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
2nd3series Comments: Opps... One of the bolts securing the rear coolant manifold broke off. We are trying titanium drill bits to drill out the bolt, no luck... Ugh.. Any ideas ?
January 12, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: A standard drill bit should work fine. - Nick at Pelican Parts  

  Search our site:    

View Cart & CheckOut | Project List | Order Status |  Help    

 

[Home] [Customer Service] [Shopping Cart] [Privacy Statement]
 [Contact Us] [About Us] [Shipping] [Map to our Location] [Careers]

Copyright © Pelican Parts Inc.

Page last updated: Fri 12/9/2016 02:06:27 AM