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Throttle Housing Replacement on your BMW
 
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Pelican Technical Article:

Throttle Housing Replacement on your BMW

Nick Czerula

Time:

3 hours3 hrs

Tab:

$200

Talent:

****

Tools:

Set of sockets, Flathead screwdriver, T20, T27 Torx drivers.

Applicable Models:

BMW 325i Sedan (2006)
BMW 325xi Sedan/Wagon (2006)
BMW 328i Coupe/Conv (2007-13)
BMW 328i xDrive Coupe (2009-13)
BMW 328i xDrive Sedan (2009-11)
BMW 328i xDrive Wagon (2009-12)
BMW 328i/xi Sedan (2007-11)
BMW 328i/xi Wagon (2007-12)
BMW 328xi Coupe (2007-13)
BMW 330i/xi Sedan (2006)
BMW 335d/i/xi Sedan (2007-11)
BMW 335i xDrive Coupe (2009-13)
BMW 335i xDrive Sedan (2009-11)
BMW 335i/is Coupe/Conv (2007-13)
BMW 335xi Coupe (2007-13)

Parts Required:

Throttle body, sealing O-ring

Hot Tip:

Work with a cool engine.

Performance Gain:

Remedy fault codes and restore engine performance

Complementary Modification:

Replace air filter.

A faulty throttle housing can cause a number of problems, from a check engine light to a rough or surging idle. Before you condemn your throttle housing, be sure to inspect all the intake air ducts. They should be well sealed and free from cracks or tears. Check function of your crankcase breather valve and inspect all breather hoses. If a breather hose cracks or fails, the air leak can cause a rough idle or engine stalling. You may have to remove the throttle housing to access other components such as the crankcase breather valve and crankcase breather hoses.

In this article, I'll go over the steps involved with replacing the throttle body on BMW E90 models. Be sure to work with a cool engine.

Remove engine covers. See our tech article on Engine Cover Removing.

Models without turbo-charger:
Working at front of radiator support, remove two T20 Torx fasteners for the intake duct.
Figure 1

Working at front of radiator support, remove two T20 Torx fasteners for the intake duct. (green arrows)

Working at intake air duct connection at air filter housing, using a small flathead screwdriver, release retaining tabs on each side and pull duct off.
Figure 2

Working at intake air duct connection at air filter housing, using a small flathead screwdriver, release retaining tabs on each side and pull duct off.

Then, pull intake duct out of radiator support and remove from vehicle.
Figure 3

Then, pull intake duct out of radiator support and remove from vehicle. (green arrow)

Then loosen hose clamp (green arrow) and remove two 10mm air filter housing fasteners.
Figure 4

Then loosen hose clamp (green arrow) and remove two 10mm air filter housing fasteners. (yellow arrows)

Disconnect mass air flow sensor electrical connector by releasing tab with small flathead screwdriver and pulling connector out of sensor.
Figure 5

Disconnect mass air flow sensor electrical connector by releasing tab with small flathead screwdriver and pulling connector out of sensor. (green arrow)

Remove air filter housing from vehicle by lifting up and disconnecting duct from mass air flow sensor.
Figure 6

Remove air filter housing from vehicle by lifting up and disconnecting duct from mass air flow sensor.

Next you will have to remove the power steering reservoir from its mounting bracket.
Figure 7

Next you will have to remove the power steering reservoir from its mounting bracket. You do not have to disconnect the hoses. Remove two 10mm mounting fasteners. (green arrows) Then remove two sliver washers from power steering reservoir grommets. Be careful not to lose the washers.

Working next to power steering reservoir, unclip vacuum hose clip by unclipping and opening.
Figure 8

Working next to power steering reservoir, unclip vacuum hose clip by unclipping and opening. (green arrow)

Remove power steering reservoir (green arrow) from mounting bracket and guide under vacuum hose (yellow arrow) and lay aside.
Figure 9

Remove power steering reservoir (green arrow) from mounting bracket and guide under vacuum hose (yellow arrow) and lay aside.

Working at throttle body intake air duct, pull off vacuum hose.
Figure 10

Working at throttle body intake air duct, pull off vacuum hose. (green arrow)

Working at throttle body, loosen intake air duct hose clamp (green arrow) using a flathead screwdriver.
Figure 11

Working at throttle body, loosen intake air duct hose clamp (green arrow) using a flathead screwdriver. You will have reach from the firewall side to access clamp with screwdriver. A shorter flathead screwdriver works best.

Pull air duct straight off throttle body.
Figure 12

Pull air duct straight off throttle body. (green arrow) Note installation position for easier reinstallation.

Working throttle housing, disconnect electrical connector by pressing plastic release tab and pulling off.
Figure 13

Working throttle housing, disconnect electrical connector by pressing plastic release tab and pulling off. (green arrow)

Remove four 10mm throttle body fasteners.
Figure 14

Remove four 10mm throttle body fasteners. (green arrows)

Once you have removed throttle body fasteners, remove throttle body from engine.
Figure 15

Once you have removed throttle body fasteners, remove throttle body from engine.

Be sure to replace throttle body sealing O-ring.
Figure 16

Be sure to replace throttle body sealing O-ring. (green arrow) Install throttle housing in reverse order of removing. Be sure electrical connector is properly engaged, listen for audible click.

Models with Turbo-Charger:
Working at front of air filter housing, using a flathead screwdriver loosen air duct hose clamp.
Figure 19

Working at front of air filter housing, squeeze connector and pull disconnect vacuum hose, then pull vacuum hose out of mount. (green arrow)

Once hose clamp is loose, reach below upper radiator hose and slide hose (green arrow) off air filter housing.
Figure 20

Working at front of air filter housing, using a flathead screwdriver loosen air duct hose clamp. (green arrow) Then loosen boost pipe hose clamp (yellow arrow). Leave boost hose connected for now.

Working at rear of air filter housing, using a flathead screwdriver loosen air duct hose clamp.
Figure 21

Once hose clamp is loose, reach below upper radiator hose and slide hose (green arrow) off air filter housing.

Pull electrical cable up off mount.
Figure 22

Working at rear of air filter housing, using a flathead screwdriver loosen air duct hose clamp. (green arrow) Next you will have to detach electrical cables from intake air pipe. (yellow arrow)

Once the electrical cables are removed, you will have to pull the air filter up and out of the rubber mounting grommets.
Figure 23

Pull electrical cable up off mount. You may have to wiggle the rubber grommet side to side to get it to come off mount. Remove all three electrical cables.

Next you will have to unlock and disconnect the front boost recirculation hose.
Figure 24

Once the electrical cables are removed, you will have to pull the air filter up and out of the rubber mounting grommets. There are two in the back and one located in the center. What I like to do is pull the front side up first, then wiggle the air filter housing until it comes out of the rear mounts. There are no fasteners holding it, just the grommets, and over time they may become stiff and will not release easily. If that is the case use caution and pull up swiftly to release.

Next, pull hose up and off air pipe.
Figure 25

Next you will have to unlock and disconnect the front boost recirculation hose. There is a gray lock, rotate this lock counterclockwise about 45° to unlock it. This style hose lock and be hard to get off due to time and debris entering collar. If so, you can rotate it using channel locks, but be careful not to damage the hose or lock, they are made out of plastic.

Next you will have to unlock and disconnect the rear boost recirculation hose.
Figure 26

Next, pull hose up and off air pipe. It should slide off easily, if it does not, lock is not fully disengaged.

Working at the boost recirculation valves, remove the vacuum hose from each valve by pulling off.
Figure 27

Next you will have to unlock and disconnect the rear boost recirculation hose. There is a gray lock, rotate this lock counterclockwise about 45° to unlock it. This style hose lock and be hard to get off due to time and debris entering collar. If so, you can rotate it using channel locks, but be careful not to damage the hose or lock, they are made out of plastic. Next, pull hose up and off air pipe. It should slide off easily, if it does not, lock is not fully disengaged.

Working at the boost air pipe, remove T27 Torx fastener.
Figure 28

Working at the boost recirculation valves, remove the vacuum hose from each valve by pulling off. Be careful not to damage hose or valve when removing.

Working at throttle body, using a flathead screwdriver, remove intake air pipe locking clip.
Figure 29

Working at the boost air pipe, remove T27 Torx fastener. (green arrow

Disconnect boost pipe from connection at radiator support, then gently wiggle pipe off throttle body.
Figure 30

Working at throttle body, using a flathead screwdriver, remove intake air pipe locking clip. (green arrow)

Working throttle housing, disconnect electrical connector by pressing plastic release tab and pulling off.
Figure 31

Disconnect boost pipe from connection at radiator support, then gently wiggle pipe off throttle body. Once pipe is clear of throttle body, remove from vehicle.

Remove four 10mm throttle body fasteners.
Figure 32

Working throttle housing, disconnect electrical connector by pressing plastic release tab and pulling off. (green arrow)

Be sure to replace throttle body sealing O-ring.
Figure 33

Remove four 10mm throttle body fasteners. (green arrows) Once you have removed throttle body fasteners, remove throttle body from engine.

34
Figure 34

Be sure to replace throttle body sealing O-ring. (green arrow) Install throttle housing in reverse order of removing. Be sure electrical connector is properly engaged, listen for audible click. Double check all hose fitting and clamps are properly installed and seated.

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Comments and Suggestions:
romanodomenico Comments: BMW e90 2010 328i
hello
my car,
trembles.
sometimes low revolutions rpm 500 and 650 increases.
This quakes felt in the steering wheel.

sometimes stopped at the light, he wants to go alone. pulldowns

change.
plugs. bmw
Air filter.
coils. delphi
maf sensor. bmw

continuous problem.

bring it to a mechanic as a last resort pay 150 dollars and they say mechanic. the computer does not log errors.
Throttle Housing clean this if I can maladjustment and damage?
or I buy new one.
that is not
if I can orient thanks
June 25, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Is the check engine light on or flashing when the problem is present? Sounds like an engine misfire. I would check spark, fuel and compression on all cylinders.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
Bob Comments: Hey, I have a question at Figure 14 that four 10 mm throttle body fasteners. Are those fasteners aluminum alloy one time only fasteners? Or just normal bolt ? and what is that torque specification when I put them back? The o- ring has to be replaced every time?
April 5, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: They are steel fasteners. I don't have the torque info.
I would grab a repair manual. It will have the procedure, special tools and torque specs.

The sealing O-ring should be replaced every time.

Give our parts specialists a call at 1-888-280-7799. - Nick at Pelican Parts
 
Raphael Comments: Hi, after Throttle body installation, do you have to RESET the part just install???
March 21, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: It's likely the internal sensors will be read differently than the old, so I would perform an adaptation, to be safe,. Using a BMW scan tool. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
saintz Comments: Do you sell the Throttle Body Assembly? I can't see it listed.
January 22, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Pelican Parts can get it for you.

Give our parts specialists a call at 1-888-280-7799. They can figure out what part or repair kit you need.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
mike Comments: hi, where is the map and maf sensor located on 2007 335i
December 21, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: The MAP is mounted on top of the intake manifold, near the firewall. There is no MAF sensor.- Nick at Pelican Parts  
mogie 1971 Comments: my e91 320d is doing 20mpg , im stumped its not maf it has no error codes its been serviced, its not turbo , no binding brakes ,not thermostats , any ideas
December 1, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Check for a restricted exhaust or engine misfire. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Javee Comments: I have a p0122 and P0123 code thats says its TPS sensor, but having a hard time locating where the TPS sensor is located i have a 2006 e90? Any idea or help
November 7, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: It is part of the throttle housing. You will have to replace the entire assembly. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Jon Comments: In figure 10, you show a vacuum hose. Any chance you can describe where that hose goes. Yours is the only picture I can find of it and I lost mine. Well, I disconnected it to replace the starter and now I cannot find it anywhere. Opps...
August 29, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: I think runs into the sheathing on one of the crankcase breather lines. Check the large plastic breather lines. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
DerekR Comments: Hi, any schematics for the 335d?
August 7, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: No, sorry. I would grab a repair manual. It will have the procedure, special tools and torque specs.

Give our parts specialists a call at 1-888-280-7799. - Nick at Pelican Parts
 
austin Comments: Hi there, I have a 2006 325i e90. I just finished swapping out a cracked intake manifold following the pelican tutorial. Everything seems to run great now, but a day after i started getting the generic P1124 code on my scanner, as well as the check engine light is now on. The code seems to be for throttle position. I removed cleaned and swapped the old throttle body onto the new manifold. I'm wondering what would cause this code/engine light. Does the ecu need a reset? or to relearn the throttle position after being removed? I have cleaned the MAP and the MAF sensors as well but still the engine light stays on. Any suggestions?
January 25, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: I would guess the connector isn't seated properly or is damaged. if you supply the last seven of the VIN I may be able to get more info on the code. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
boosie64 Comments: In reference to figure 10 - Working at throttle body intake air duct, pull off vacuum hose.

Where does the other end of this vacuum hose connect to?
April 22, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: If I remember correctly, it attaches at the valve cover. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
George Comments: I just recently removed my throttle body housing to clean it because I was getting P1638 and P1639 codes. This helped for a couple of weeks but it came back this morning causing the car to go into limp mode yet again.

It has been really cold here and I've heard that the weather wreaks havoc on this part. But if it is not the weather and the throttle housing is bad the I guess I will need to replace it. But I cannot seem to find the part on your site.

My car is a 2006 330i.
February 26, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Give our parts specialists a call at 1-888-280-7799. They can help you find the right part.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 

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