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Intake Manifold Gasket Replacement
 
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Pelican Technical Article:

Intake Manifold Gasket Replacement

Nick Czerula

Time:

4 hours4 hrs

Tab:

$200

Talent:

****

Tools:

Set of sockets, wrenches, screwdrivers

Applicable Models:

BMW 323Ci Coupe/Conv (1999-00)
BMW 323i Sedan/Wagon (1999-00)
BMW 325Ci Coupe/Conv (2001-06)
BMW 325i/xi Sedan/Wagon (2001-06)

Parts Required:

Intake manifold gaskets

Hot Tip:

Work with a cool engine

Performance Gain:

Repair vacuum leaks from old gaskets

Complementary Modification:

Replace crankcase vent valve

The molded plastic intake manifold of the BMW 6-cylinder E46 is configured as two sets of three runners with variable lengths. Low-end torque and high end power are improved by varying the intake runner length according to a map stored in the engine control module (ECM). Engine vacuum, load and ambient temperature are used by the ECM to determine the rpm at which to switch intake manifold configuration. The actuator used by the ECM to switch the manifold configuration is a vacuum solenoid called the dual resonance intake system or DISA valve. 

At low to mid-range engine speeds (up to about 3750 rpm), engine torque is increased as the DISA valve closes a flap inside the manifold, effectively increasing the length of the intake runners.

From mid-range to high engine speeds (4100 rpm and higher), DISA is de-energized. This opens the resonance flap inside the intake manifold and allows air to be drawn into the cylinders through additional intake runners. This provides extra air for the power needed at higher rpms.

Another function of the design is that resonance waves inside the manifold pulse back and forth between opening and closing intake valves and help in cylinder filling.

Most E46 models utilize a runner profile-style gasket for the intake manifold. Over time the gaskets harden from heat or they swell from oil contamination. This article will describe the steps involved in replacing your E46 intake manifold gasket. If you find oil inside your intake manifold, replace the crankcase breather valve. Clean the inside of the intake manifold thoroughly and be careful not to get any debris inside the cylinder head during the procedure. 

If you have a hard-to-find vacuum leak, replace your intake manifold gaskets. Removing the intake manifold will also give you easy access to the engine starter, knock sensors or coolant pipes and hoses.

ItâÂs a good idea to relieve the fuel system pressure before beginning. This will minimize the amount of fuel spilled. The best way to relieve fuel system pressure is to remove the fuel pump fuse and run the vehicle until the engine stalls. How to do this is described later in this procedure.

Keep in mind that when your car was serviced before, parts may have been replaced with different size fasteners used in the replacement. The sizes of the nuts and bolts we give may be different from what you have, so be prepared with different size sockets and wrenches. 

Protect your eyes, hands and body from fluids, dust and debris while working on your vehicle. If you are working with the electrical system, disconnect the battery before beginning. Always catch fluids in appropriate containers and properly dispose of any fluid waste. Recycle parts, packaging and fluids when possible. Do not work on your vehicle if you feel the task is beyond your ability. 

Vehicle models change and evolve, as they grow older, so the vehicle shown in our illustrations may vary slightly from yours. If something seems different, let us know and share your info to help other users. Do you have questions or want to add to the article? Leave a comment below. When leaving a comment, please leave your vehicle information.

It's a good idea to relieve fuel system pressure before starting this project.
Figure 1

It's a good idea to relieve fuel system pressure before starting this project. This will minimize the amount of fuel spilled. The best way to relieve fuel system pressure is to remove the fuel pump fuse and run the vehicle until the engine stalls. Open the glove compartment. Rotate the fuse panel retaining tabs 90 degrees and lower the fuse panel.

Remove fuse #54 (check that this fuse applies to your vehicle).
Figure 2

Remove fuse #54 (check that this fuse applies to your vehicle). Use the fuse application chart located below your fuses to identify the fuse number. Start and run the engine until it stalls. Once the engine stalls, attempt to start it again, if it does not start, the fuel system pressure has been relieved. Keep in mind; this does not remove all the fuel from the fuel lines, only the pressure. So you still need to be prepared to catch leaking fuel when fuel lines are disconnected. Next, disconnect the negative (-) battery cable.

Remove the air filter housing assembly fasteners (yellow arrows) and disconnect the air flow meter electrical connector (green arrow).
Figure 3

Remove the air filter housing assembly fasteners (yellow arrows) and disconnect the air flow meter electrical connector (green arrow).

Loosen the air flow meter clamp (green arrow), then disconnect the duct from air flow meter and remove the air filter housing from the engine compartment.
Figure 4

Loosen the air flow meter clamp (green arrow), then disconnect the duct from air flow meter and remove the air filter housing from the engine compartment.

While working at the intake air duct, pull the vacuum hose connector out of the duct.
Figure 5

While working at the intake air duct, pull the vacuum hose connector out of the duct. Remove the engine cover. See our tech article Removing Engine Cover for more info. 

Now, at the left front corner of cylinder head cover, disconnect the crankcase vent hose by squeezing the release tabs and pulling away from the cylinder head cover.
Figure 6

Now, at the left front corner of cylinder head cover, disconnect the crankcase vent hose by squeezing the release tabs and pulling away from the cylinder head cover.

While working near left shock tower, remove the rubber weather strip from body by pulling it off (yellow arrow).
Figure 7

While working near left shock tower, remove the rubber weather strip from body by pulling it off (yellow arrow).

Rotate the panel clips 90 degrees counterclockwise to release (green arrows).
Figure 8

Rotate the panel clips 90 degrees counterclockwise to release (green arrows).

Next, pull the hoses up and out of trim panel (green arrows).
Figure 9

Next, pull the hoses up and out of trim panel (green arrows). Be careful not to lose the hose mounts, they have a tendency to fall off the hoses.

Now, pull the trim panel (yellow arrow) up to remove, guiding it past the hoses.
Figure 10

Now, pull the trim panel (yellow arrow) up to remove, guiding it past the hoses.

At brake booster, remove the brake booster vacuum hose (yellow arrow) by pulling it straight out of brake booster.
Figure 11

At brake booster, remove the brake booster vacuum hose (yellow arrow) by pulling it straight out of brake booster. Next, remove the throttle housing.

Now, at the top of the intake manifold, locate the oxygen sensor connectors (green arrows).
Figure 12

Now, at the top of the intake manifold, locate the oxygen sensor connectors (green arrows). Slide both connectors out of the mounting bracket and lay the oxygen sensor wiring harness aside.

Working at the center of the intake manifold, disconnect the intake air temperature sensor electrical connector by releasing the tab and pulling it off (yellow arrow).
Figure 13

Working at the center of the intake manifold, disconnect the intake air temperature sensor electrical connector by releasing the tab and pulling it off (yellow arrow).

Working at the VANOS solenoid, disconnect the VANOS solenoid electrical connector by releasing the tab and pulling it off (yellow arrow).
Figure 14

Working at the VANOS solenoid, disconnect the VANOS solenoid electrical connector by releasing the tab and pulling it off (yellow arrow).

Then release the fuel injector harness strip from the fuel injectors and remove.
Figure 15

Then release the fuel injector harness strip from the fuel injectors and remove. I find the easiest way to do this is to use a flathead screwdriver and gently pry up at each fuel injector. This will release the spring clips that hold electrical harness to the fuel injectors.

Work your way down the injectors while disconnecting the injector harness.
Figure 16

Work your way down the injectors while disconnecting the injector harness. Lay the fuel injector harness aside.

Working at right shock tower, open the battery positive (+) jump start connector.
Figure 17

Working at right shock tower, open the battery positive (+) jump start connector. Then using a 19mm wrench, remove the nut from the connection. Remove battery positive (+) cable from the junction.

Now, on top of the intake manifold, unclip the battery positive (+) cable from the intake manifold (green arrow).
Figure 18

Now, on top of the intake manifold, unclip the battery positive (+) cable from the intake manifold (green arrow). Later in the procedure, when removing the intake manifold from the engine, you will have to feed the cable through the intake runner.

Working at the rear of the intake manifold, disconnect the fuel line by pressing the release tab and pulling it apart.
Figure 19

Working at the rear of the intake manifold, disconnect the fuel line by pressing the release tab and pulling it apart. Have a rag handy to catch any dripping fuel. You will have to reach behind the intake manifold, near firewall (green arrow). You can see the line, but will have to do this part mostly by feel.

Reach behind the intake manifold and locate the fuel line (green arrow).
Figure 20

Reach behind the intake manifold and locate the fuel line (green arrow). Push the fuel line toward the fuel rail (purple arrow) then press the release tab (yellow arrow) and slide the fuel line off the connection. Have a rag handy to catch any dripping fuel.

Working from below the intake near throttle housing mounting surface (purple arrow), locate the intake manifold mounting bracket.
Figure 21

Working from below the intake near throttle housing mounting surface (purple arrow), locate the intake manifold mounting bracket. Then remove the 16mm nut from mounting bracket (green arrow).

Working at the front of the intake manifold, pull the evaporative emission purge solenoid off the mounting bracket.
Figure 22

Working at the front of the intake manifold, pull the evaporative emission purge solenoid off the mounting bracket. It is mounted in a rubber bushing and pulls straight off the bracket (purple arrow). Disconnect the electrical connector by squeezing the release tab and pulling it off.

Then disconnect the canister connection hose by squeezing the release tab and pulling off the solenoid (green arrow).
Figure 23

Then disconnect the canister connection hose by squeezing the release tab and pulling off the solenoid (green arrow).

Working at the rear of the intake manifold, disconnect the solenoid electrical connector by squeezing the release tab and pulling it off (green arrow).
Figure 24

Working at the rear of the intake manifold, disconnect the solenoid electrical connector by squeezing the release tab and pulling it off (green arrow). Then, reach between the firewall and the intake manifold and disconnect the vacuum line at solenoid.

Remove the nine 11mm intake manifold nuts (green arrows).
Figure 25

Remove the nine 11mm intake manifold nuts (green arrows). Once the fasteners have been removed, lift the intake manifold up and off the cylinder head. Cut the wire ties securing the wiring harness to the intake manifold. Continue to lift the intake manifold off the cylinder head, disconnecting the hoses or the electrical connectors. Then remove the intake manifold from the engine. Once removed, seal the intake ports to prevent debris from entering the cylinder head.

Before installing, replace the intake manifold gaskets.
Figure 26

Before installing, replace the intake manifold gaskets. Remove them by prying them out with a small flathead screwdriver. Install new gaskets by pressing them in, check that all gaskets are properly seated before reinstalling the intake manifold.

If you plan to replace your crankcase breather valve, now would be a good time. You have great access to it and can easily connect the hoses. Remove the items you used to seal the intake ports on the cylinder head. Then install the cylinder head to the engine and tighten the fasteners in an alternating pattern. Reconnect the knock sensor electrical connectors then reconnect the fuel lines. Reinstall the evaporative emission purge valve. Reconnect the fuel injectors and the intake air temperature sensor. Reinstall the remaining items in reverse order of removal. Double the check wiring harness routing and the fuel line connections. Once complete, let the engine idle for about 10 minutes, and check for any loose connections or misrouted wires.
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Comments and Suggestions:
tarik Comments: I m trying to put back my 99 bmw 328i intake manifold, but I stuck at the fuel rail
can you show me where does the house in the picture red arrow is connected to, is it connected to the back of the manifold or to the air pump

also which one of the fuel rail lines is connected to the blue gas hose and which one is connected to the black gas hose
October 31, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Looks like for the secondary air valve. To be 100% sure, check the vacuum diagram on the emission label under the vehicle hood. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Chuck Comments: I have a 2002 325ci It had a blown head gasket so I had it machined and replaced all gaskets and fluid. Now at start up it runs fine until it gets warm then I get bluish white smoke. I don't use the traditional CCV I have a catch can which I have installed on many 325's with the CCV systems. So I removed the plugs and I find oil on them fouling the plugs, next I removed the intake and I see oil right at the intake gasket which I didn't replace cause it looked fine but now I see oil under the intake where it was clean and at the intake opening for all 6 cylinders and down the ports to the valves. Is it gaskets or piston rings-uugghh Please tell me good news.
September 28, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: hard to say. if in the intake, more likely to be a breather issue. Oil would not come from the cylinders into the intake. Your best bet is to perform a leak down test to rule out rings. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
JMW325i Comments: Nick, Great article. I am considering removing the intake to access the 2 top bell housing bolts to get the trans off. I can't get my fat hands to the top bolts to guide a socket with extensions, wobble ends, universals, etc. All Cross members are off and the engine is rocked back but I still can't get to the 2 top bolts. Do you recommend removing the intake to access these two bolts? Also, should I upgrade clutch to "non" dual mass type? Any issues if I do?
January 25, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Non-dual-mass is fine, but you will notice more engine vibrations. Be prepared for that.

try lowering the tail or the trans, then using a long extension to get to the top bolts. You shouldn't have to remove the intake. - Nick at Pelican Parts
 
dirtymomo Comments: Took me a while to realize the throttle body needs to be removed : After 2 projects valve cover gasket replacement and pcv valve replacement oil still burns somewhere under the hood. Car still runs, but smells badly and other drivers are afraid of the smoke coming from my hood on traffic lights.
January 12, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Can you see what area of the exhaust the oil is leaking on to? If so, follow that oil up until you find the area f the leak. Look for an oily area, with a clean fresh oil steak. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
John Comments: 01 325I There is a hard tube connected onto the dipstick bracket. Do you know what this is or where it goes?
September 29, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: It looks like an evap hose. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
John Comments: 325I 01 What is this on the firewall side of the Int Mani? This rubber hose broke - Do you know where it goes or if I can simply piece back to gether with the extra Crankcase breather Valve tubing I purchased? Thanks
September 29, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: That may connect to the rear of the cylinder head, for the secondary air valve. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
JLH Comments: This is on the firewall side of intake manifold, this hose broke. What is it and can I just pacth it? OR do I have to buy a whole new line? Thanks
September 27, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Replace the entire vacuum hose that broke. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
JLH Comments: I had a tube break off the bracket of the Dip Stick. Do you know what this is? Can I patch or need a whole new one.
September 27, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Just replace the flexible end with a new piece of fuel hose. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
JLH Comments: I followed the steps. In fig 15 it states use a flat head to remove fuel injector harness strip. I chiped and crack a few of the harnesses. Will I have to replace? or if they stay in place am I good? BMW 325I 01
September 23, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: I would need to see a photo, but if you broke the connector it likely needs to be replaced. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Shawn Comments: Hello 2005 330xi , I removed intake to replace starter, car starts now , I hear occasional pop noise in intake , dtc p0102, trans lite on , only idles when put in gear, also I removed positive cable before removing starter . Any help will be appreciated thanks , ECU OR remove intake and check over ?
August 30, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: I would double check the electrical connectors, hoses and intake. Something may have been left off or connected improperly. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
alikryem Comments: before install can i reinstall the same gaskets if they are in good condiesion ? and is it get injured or no good when ever removing the intake manifold??do i have to get new ones?
June 29, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: No, I would suggest replacing them. I have not seen any that were not flattened and reusable. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Counselor Comments: How long does it take to replace an intake manifold gasket for a 2004 325ci? Also how long does it take to fix a crankcase vent valve? And lastly, about how long will it take to fix six spark plugs?
June 15, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: I would set aside a day to do all of those repairs.

If you are looking for an estimate for the repairs, contact a local shop and have them throw one together. - Nick at Pelican Parts
 
JLH Comments: Replacing Heater Inlet Pipe on E46 and have to take off IM. Do I have to also take off the Throttle Housing as well? Also While I have this off what other parts should I replace underneat the IM?
March 9, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Follow the instructions in the tech article you commented on:

http://www.pelicanparts.com/BMW/techarticles/BMW-3-Series-E46/24-FUEL-Intake_Manifold_Gasket_Replacement/24-FUEL-Intake_Manifold_Gasket_Replacement.htm - Nick at Pelican Parts
 
Mike Comments: What type of cleaner would you recommend? Also what can I use to clean the fuel injectors?
March 5, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Use soap and water with a soft bristle b=rush. Wipe the tips of the injectors clean using fresh gasoline. Be sure to protect you skin. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Mike Comments: What would you suggest cleaning the inside of the manifold with? I have a lot of build up on the inside and since I will have it off would like to clean it up.
March 4, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: If there is residue or oil inside it, yes, clean it out. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
JLH Comments: Need to replace Heater inlet pipe only. Do you have a DIY guide for this? If not you stated I had to remove the IM. Above are the steps to do a complete removal. If I am only replacing the Heater inlet pipe, do I have to complete all of the above steps in order to get that pipe out? If not which ones can I skip?
February 26, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: You didn't mention what vehicle. If you are working on an E46 and need to replace the plastic pipe beneath the intake manifold. Remove the intake manifold, then remove the pip fasteners, replace pipe and reverse removal steps. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
postmod Comments: Pulled on this 1/4" vacuum hose and it was loose. Had damaged end. Can't find where it goes. It runs along the fuel rail before going under the intake.
February 19, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: It may connect to the side of the crankcase breather valve. Check if it broke off from there. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Chris Comments: Thanks Nick. Turned out the fuel line was not fully seated and after I left it is running for a while it actually emptied the gas tank on the road despite reading 1/4 tank... Weird. Reseating the fuel line and then adding s jerrycan of fuel and it started find and the fuel smell is fading away.
January 19, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Thanks for the follow up. We appreciate it.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
Chris Comments: Hi,

I just removed and replaced my intake manifold to change my starter which was successful. However, after driving it for 30 minutes I parked on a steep uphill incline and went inside. A few hours later when I tried to move the car, it started, I backed out off the incline on to the street and the engine coughed, struggled and quit. After a few retries it restarted but had a very very strong fuel smell.

I'm wondering if this could be a result of the intake manifold replacement. The only thing I can think about is the reconnection or the fuel line to the fuel rail. While I am pretty sure it is properly seater, it was possible for me to separate the line if I pulled it firmly. Even removing the rail and bringing to fuel line to a more accessible area, I could seem to make a connection that would not separate. Is it possible the line is leaking? It seems to work fine now, which is odd...

Is there another potential cause? Any feedback would be appreciated.
January 18, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: If it started fine at first, I would think the fuel line was connected properly. A sensor may be misconnected. I would start by checking the DME for fault codes. If the system is not working properly, a fault code will be set. This will be your best bet when diagnosing.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
325pride Comments: Nick, thanks for your quick response. Turning counter clockwise when facing the head of the bolt was what I did but cannot loosen it. Maybe I let the penetration "fluid film" sit there for longer and try again.

Thank you very much.
January 6, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: let me know how it works out. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
325pride Comments: another one
January 6, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Just replace the vacuum hose, the solenoid nipple looks to be intact. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
325pride Comments: photo 2
January 6, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: This photo is too blurry, can't see any detail. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
325pride Comments: Hi, Nick,

Here are the photos of the small parts that I am talking about.
January 6, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Just replace the vacuum hose, the solenoid nipple looks to be intact. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
325pride Comments: Nick, I cannot take off the fuel line but managed to take off the manifold. However, I broke two little hoses; one is connected to a parts below the starter, and one is to the right hand side of the car. those two hoses are connected to a small parts at the rear of the manifold.

By the way, I removed the manifold because my starter is gone and I would also like to replaced the CCV. However, the screws of the starter stuck so tight that I cannot loosen them. I sprayed a lot of fluid film but no luck. I turned counterclock when facing the screw, right?

Thank you very much for your advise.
January 6, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: The bolts for the starter are removed in a counterclockwise direction when facing the head of the bolt.

Just replace the vacuum hose, the solenoid nipple looks to be intact. - Nick at Pelican Parts
 
john Comments: Nick, I cant find the torque down specs for the intake manifold bolts. Do you know what they are? Thanks. Great piece that makes a tough job a lot easier.
September 26, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: I don't have them handy. I would grab a repair manual. It will have the procedure, special tools and torque specs.

Give our parts specialists a call at 1-888-280-7799. - Nick at Pelican Parts
 
Doug Comments: I just want to thank you guys for the photos of the repair. The Bentley manual does not have good coverage for this repair, and the photos really helped, especially the last one showing the underside. You and Bentley do not mention that the idle control valve and the throttle must come off the manifold to reach the 16mm bolt. I was trying to do it blind, and could not do it. It worked out and my car runs like a champ after replacing the CCV and all the hoses.
August 7, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Step 11 mentions removing the throttle housing. ;)

Glad it helped and that your car is fixed. - Nick at Pelican Parts
 
fernie Comments: im trying to disconnect the fuel line but cant figure out the clip
May 27, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Push and hold the plastic release clip toward line and hold it while pulling the line off. This is how for an E46, like in the article. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
edgarmacedo316 Comments: so i took the manifold off because i thought i had a water leak in one of the hose underneath the intake manifold, i was wrong i saw it was leaking from the metal part i am pointing atdon't know the name but can it be replace? fix? or is the whole engine done for? :
February 23, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: That is the cylinder head. If it is coming through the aluminum, the cylinder head is faulty. I would pressure test the cooling system to confirm the location of the leak. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
edgarmacedo316 Comments: how do i remove the nut underneath the it? under the throttle motor, i cant reach it nor see it.
February 9, 2014
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: If you cannot see it, locate it by feel, follow the bracket down to the nut. Then remove it using a socket and a ratchet. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
diva_3181377 Comments: Thanks for the suggestion on not putting oil in the gasket. Also at what interval do i need to change the coolant temperature sensor? Car have 120k on it. I am taking about the sensor under the intake cylinder 6. Easy to change with the intake out.
August 29, 2013
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: If you are in there and want to replace it, I would say 100k is a good time, so now. Most automotive parts have an expected life span of 100k miles. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
diva_3181377 Comments: While putting the intake manifold gasket or throttle body gasket, do i need to coat it with little oil?

Just like MBA from Lebanon, i am doing this to replace the water pipe under. Also replacing the CVV and TB gasket and all vacuum hoses,
August 27, 2013
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: No, do not coat rubber profile gaskets with any lubricant. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
MBA Comments: thank you very much sir, you helped me alot.
my name is mohamad al_khatib and iam from lebanon.
i want to replace the intake manifold just to change the water Pipe below it
July 19, 2013
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Scott Comments: Is there a difference between the Intake manifold specified up to 9/2002 BMW#11617502268 and the part which you show as superceding that part BMW#11617525752, or is the later part a direct repl/upgrade to the earlier part#?
July 5, 2013
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: I am not sure what the difference in part # is. i would contact BMW, they may be able to tell you. - Nick at Pelican Parts  

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