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Pelican Technical Article:

Head Gasket Replacement

Nick Czerula

Time:

12 hours12 hrs

Tab:

$250

Talent:

*****

Tools:

Set of sockets hex, Allen, Torx, wrenches (19mm, 32mm), screwdrivers, camshaft timing tools. BMW special tool 11 6 180, 11 2 300, 11 3 240, 11 4 220, 11 6 150

Applicable Models:

BMW 323Ci Coupe/Conv (1999-00)
BMW 323i Sedan/Wagon (1999-00)
BMW 325Ci Coupe/Conv (2001-06)
BMW 325i/xi Sedan/Wagon (2001-06)
BMW 328Ci Coupe (1999-00)
BMW 328i Sedan (1999-00)
BMW 330Ci Coupe/Conv (2001-06)
BMW 330i/xi Sedan (2001-06)

Parts Required:

Head gasket kit, coolant pipe and O-rings, sealing compound 3 Bond 1209

Hot Tip:

Work with a cool engine.

Performance Gain:

Repair oil and coolant leaks

Complementary Modification:

Replace VANOS oil line

The cylinder head gasket seals the seam between the top component of the engine, the cylinder head, and the bottom end, cylinder block or crankcase. It is responsible for sealing the combustion chambers, the oil passages and the coolant away from each other. The sealing surfaces of the cylinder head and cylinder block are machined very precisely to be absolutely flat. The head gasket is designed to fill any irregularities that the machining left behind. In addition, the metal parts expand and contract due to thermal changes, and they do so at different rates because they are made of different metals. This means that the head gasket is required to allow some slippage and to fill distortions between the sealing surfaces even though the entire assembly is bolted together at very high torque.

Cylinder head bolts are designed to stretch and stay stretched when torqued and are therefore one-time-use bolts. They are threaded into the soft alloy of the cylinder block, which, due to the thermal stresses of the engine, may lose its ability to hold the bolts tightly.

Therefore, with aging and mileage, the head gasket may fail. When this happens, you could have engine overheating, oil and coolant mixing along with a poor running motor. On BMW E46 models it is often the case that you cannot simply replace the head gasket; faulty threads in the cylinder block make this a useless repair. Before repairing a faulty head gasket, attempt to re-torque the cylinder head bolts. See our tech article On Cylinder Head Bolt Testing. If the bolts will not tighten, the block is faulty as well. Not all hope is lost as you can repair the thread holes with time-serts, which work quite well. However, most times, if the cylinder head bolt threads are faulty, it is better to go with a used lower mileage engine. 

To replace the head gasket, you need a handful of special tools not limited to but including:

  • Camshaft timing tools
  • Torque wrench
  • Angle finder
  • Plastic clean up tool
  • Standard hand tools 

Be sure to have your cylinder head professionally cleaned and pressure tested before reinstalling. 

Read through the entire procedure before beginning. Be sure this is not above your skill level, as engine damage can occur if engine timing is not correct.

Keep in mind that when your car was serviced before, parts may have been replaced with different size fasteners used in the replacement. The sizes of the nuts and bolts we give may be different from what you have, so be prepared with different size sockets and wrenches. 

Protect your eyes, hands and body from fluids, dust and debris while working on your vehicle. If you are working with the electrical system, disconnect the battery before beginning. Always catch fluids in appropriate containers and properly dispose of any fluid waste. Recycle parts, packaging and fluids when possible. Do not work on your vehicle if you feel the task is beyond your ability. 

Vehicle models change and evolve, as they grow older, so the vehicle shown in our illustrations may vary slightly from yours. If something seems different, let us know and share your info to help other users. Do you have questions or want to add to the article? Leave a comment below. When leaving a comment, please leave your vehicle information.

The majority of the procedure will be shown on an engine that is not installed in a vehicle. The steps are the same as if it was installed.

Drain the engine oil and coolant.

Disconnect the negative (-) battery cable. See our tech article on battery replacing for connection notes.

Remove the engine covers. See our tech article on removing engine covers.

Remove the valve cover. See our tech article on valve cover gasket replacing.

Remove the engine cooling fan and shroud. See our tech article on engine cooling fan replacing.

Remove the exhaust manifold. See our tech article on exhaust manifold replacing.

Remove the intake manifold. See our tech article on intake manifold replacing.

With intake manifold removed, you now have to remove the coolant pipe (green arrow) from the crankcase.
Figure 1

With intake manifold removed, you now have to remove the coolant pipe (green arrow) from the crankcase. These pipes almost always break; have a new on hand with new O-rings.

Using a 19mm wrench, remove VANOS oil line, (below oil filter housing).
Figure 2

Using a 19mm wrench, remove VANOS oil line, (below oil filter housing). Cover line and opening to prevent dirt from entering VANOS system. (purple arrow). This line has to be moved out of the way to remove the coolant pipe.

Using a flathead screwdriver, level up the hose clamp until it reaches the stop.
Figure 3

Using a flathead screwdriver, level up the hose clamp until it reaches the stop. (green arrow) Then pull the hose straight off the coolant pipe.

Working at front and rear of coolant pipe, remove two 10mm fasteners.
Figure 4

Working at front and rear of coolant pipe, remove two 10mm fasteners. (green arrows) Photo shows fasteners already removed.

Remove the coolant pipe from the cylinder head.
Figure 5

Remove the coolant pipe from the cylinder head. If needed, gently lever between the cylinder head the coolant pipe flange (green arrow). The pipe usually gets stuck and breaks. If it does, be sure to get all the pieces out of the engine.

Remove plastic camshaft cover from cylinder head by pulling up and off cylinder head.
Figure 6

Remove plastic camshaft cover from cylinder head by pulling up and off cylinder head.

Using a 22mm socket on the crankshaft pulley fastener to rotate engine.
Figure 7

Using a 22mm socket on the crankshaft pulley fastener to rotate engine.

Rotate engine clockwise until the first camshaft lobes point toward each other.
Figure 8

Rotate engine clockwise until the first camshaft lobes point toward each other. (green arrows) This brings engine to cylinder #1 TDC position. This is the first step in locking the engine timing position.

Next you are going to remove the dust plug from crankcase.
Figure 9

Next you are going to remove the dust plug from crankcase. It is located below engine, inside of mounting reinforcement. This photo shows the plug (green arrow) on an engine removed from vehicle for clarity. Purple arrow points to engine oil pan.

Remove plug from crankcase.
Figure 10

Remove plug from crankcase. The dust plug can become stuck over time. If needed, pry out using a flathead screwdriver. Green arrow points to dust plug. Purple arrow points to throttle housing.

Next, install crankshaft locking pin tool (11 2 300) into the hole dust plug was removed from.
Figure 11

Next, install crankshaft locking pin tool (11 2 300) into the hole dust plug was removed from. When installing tool, push in until it bottoms out. Slowly rotate engine until pin drops in about 12mm further. Once the tool is installed, confirm the crankshaft can no longer be rotated. Follow the instructions that came along with your special tool kit to ensure proper use.

Remove the studs at rear of cylinder head using a 10mm deep socket.
Figure 12

Remove the studs at rear of cylinder head using a 10mm deep socket. (green arrows)

Install camshaft locking jig (11 3 240) at rear of camshafts.
Figure 13

Install camshaft locking jig (11 3 240) at rear of camshafts. (green arrow) Jig should slide down onto square bosses on end of camshafts, then secure together. Follow the instructions that came along with your special tool kit to ensure proper use.

Working at front of VANOS actuator, remove upper 8mm Allen plug.
Figure 14

Working at front of VANOS actuator, remove upper 8mm Allen plug.

Next, remove lower 8mm Allen plug.
Figure 15

Next, remove lower 8mm Allen plug. When you remove the lower plug, be prepared to catch a small amount of oil in a container.

Using needle nose vise grips, pull plastic plugs out of VANOS actuator.
Figure 16

Using needle nose vise grips, pull plastic plugs out of VANOS actuator. (green arrow) There is one plug for each camshaft.

Next you are going to remove the VANOS fasteners.
Figure 17

Next you are going to remove the VANOS fasteners. The fasteners are T30 Torx and left hand thread. To remove, rotate in clockwise direction.

Remove engine hoisting hook fasteners then remove hook from engine.
Figure 18

Remove engine hoisting hook fasteners then remove hook from engine. (green arrows)

Remove seven 10mm VANOS actuator fasteners.
Figure 19

Remove seven 10mm VANOS actuator fasteners. (green arrows)

Slide VANOS actuator off cylinder head and remove.
Figure 20

Slide VANOS actuator off cylinder head and remove. Be prepared to catch excess oil in a rag.

Using a 32mm deep socket or wrench, remove the primary timing chain tensioner.
Figure 21

Using a 32mm deep socket or wrench, remove the primary timing chain tensioner. Located at the right side of the engine.

Next you have to compress the secondary timing chain tensioner and lock it into the compressed position.
Figure 22

Next you have to compress the secondary timing chain tensioner and lock it into the compressed position. It is located at the top front of the cylinder head. Push down on the top guide, then insert a pin (green arrow) into the hole in tensioner (yellow arrow).

Working at the exhaust camshaft, remove the three 10mm impulse wheel fasteners (green arrows).
Figure 23

Working at the exhaust camshaft, remove the three 10mm impulse wheel fasteners (green arrows).

Next remove the impulse wheel from the camshaft.
Figure 24

Next remove the impulse wheel from the camshaft.

Then remove the spring plate.
Figure 25

Then remove the spring plate. As you remove these items, note the installation orientation. I like to lay them down in the order they came off.

Then remove the intake camshaft sprocket 10mm nuts (green arrows).
Figure 26

Then remove the intake camshaft sprocket 10mm nuts (green arrows). Then remove the spring plate, it is labeled ÂÂ"frontÂÂ".

Now back at the exhaust camshaft, remove the three E8 inverted Torx bolts.
Figure 27

Now back at the exhaust camshaft, remove the three E8 inverted Torx bolts. (green arrows). Only two shown, one is blocked by my hand.

A few mechanics I know like to zip tie the camshaft timing chain onto the sprockets before removing it.
Figure 28

A few mechanics I know like to zip tie the camshaft timing chain onto the sprockets before removing it. This helps to keep them is the right order and prepped for reinstallation in the case you donÂÂ't have the special tool.

Lift camshaft timing chain with sprockets off camshafts.
Figure 29

Lift camshaft timing chain with sprockets off camshafts. The intake camshaft splined shaft (green arrow) will come off with them.

Remove four 10mm timing chain tensioner fasteners (green arrows).
Figure 30

Remove four 10mm timing chain tensioner fasteners (green arrows). Then remove timing chain tensioner from cylinder head.

Pull splined shaft out of exhaust camshaft and store with other exhaust camshaft components.
Figure 31

Pull splined shaft out of exhaust camshaft and store with other exhaust camshaft components.

Next, remove the exhaust camshaft sprocket from the timing chain.
Figure 32

Next, remove the exhaust camshaft sprocket from the timing chain. Then store the sprocket with the other exhaust camshaft components. For now, loop the timing chain on top of the exhaust camshaft end to temporarily store it.

Now you have to remove the four E8 inverted Torx timing chain cover fasteners (green arrows).
Figure 33

Now you have to remove the four E8 inverted Torx timing chain cover fasteners (green arrows). Be sure to note the location of each fastener as they are different lengths. Then remove the timing chain guide (yellow arrow) from the cylinder head.

We are now at the part where the cylinder head bolts can be removed (green arrows).
Figure 34

We are now at the part where the cylinder head bolts can be removed (green arrows). There are two ways to do this; you can remove the camshafts first or leave the camshafts installed. I prefer to leave the camshafts installed as this saves time. There are notches in the camshafts that allow access to the bolts. Remove all fourteen E12 inverted Torx bolts from the cylinder head. Start in the center of the cylinder head and work your outward.

Once the bolts are lose, I remove them with a magnet.
Figure 35

Once the bolts are lose, I remove them with a magnet.

Then I remove the washer from the below the camshafts using a magnet.
Figure 36

Then I remove the washer from the below the camshafts using a magnet.

Now you can remove the cylinder head from the engine.
Figure 37

Now you can remove the cylinder head from the engine. Have a friend to help you lift it off. Especially if the engine is installed, as it is long and awkward when lifting.

Next remove the cylinder head gasket from the cylinder head.
Figure 38

Next remove the cylinder head gasket from the cylinder head. Once the head is removed, send it to a machine shop to be cleaned and pressure checked for cracks and warpage.

Remove all of the old head gasket material from the block.
Figure 39

Remove all of the old head gasket material from the block. I like to use the green 3M clean up tool. (green arrow) it is safe to use on engines and does a great job of cleaning it up. Do not mar or scratch the surface while cleaning and take care that no gasket material gets into the water jackets.

Check the block deck for warping.
Figure 40

Check the block deck for warping. A maximum of 0.05mm is allowed. Use a straight edge bar designed for checking engine straightness and a feeler gauge. If your head had to be machined, be sure you ordered the thicker head gasket to make up for the material that was removed. Working at the front of the block where the timing cover joins, apply the sealing compound 3 Bond 1209 over the joints.

Place new cylinder head gasket on the block.
Figure 41

Place new cylinder head gasket on the block. Be sure both alignment dowels are in good shape (green arrows) Lower head back onto engine, as you guide timing chain up through timing cover area.

Check that cylinder 1 intake and exhaust camshaft lobes are pointing toward each other (yellow arrows) before installing head onto block.
Figure 42

Check that cylinder 1 intake and exhaust camshaft lobes are pointing toward each other (yellow arrows) before installing head onto block. If you have to move the camshafts once the head is installed, rotate the crankshaft to 30° before TDC. Install new cylinder head bolts into the cylinder head. Lightly coat the threads with clean engine oil and install finger tight. Do not reuse old cylinder head bolts.

My head gasket came with the torque specs along with the tightening sequence.
Figure 43

My head gasket came with the torque specs along with the tightening sequence. This was quite handy. The cylinder head bolts are torqued in three stages.

Stage 1: Start by torqueing the head bolts to 40 Nm (30 ft-lb).
Figure 44

Stage 1: Start by torqueing the head bolts to 40 Nm (30 ft-lb). Start in the center and work your way outward, alternating side to side. Use the previous photo as a reference. After the initial torqueing, you will have to torque the bolts a total of two more times. Each time rotating the head bolt an additional 90°.

Stage 2, use an angle finder and tighten the head bolts an additional 90°.
Figure 45

Stage 2, use an angle finder and tighten the head bolts an additional 90°. Start in the center and work your way outward, alternating side to side. Stage 3, use an angle finder and tighten the head bolts an additional 90°. Start in the center and work your way outward, alternating side to side.

Reinstall the timing chain guide onto the cylinder head (yellow arrow).
Figure 46

Reinstall the timing chain guide onto the cylinder head (yellow arrow). Then install and tighten the four E8 inverted Torx timing chain cover fasteners (green arrows). Be sure to use earlier noted location of each fastener as they are different lengths. Tighten fasteners to 10 Nm (89 in-lb)

Lock camshafts in place.
Figure 47

Lock camshafts in place. Install camshaft locking jig (11 3 240) at rear of camshafts. (green arrow) Jig should slide down onto square bosses on end of camshafts, then secure together. Follow the instructions that came along with your special tool kit to ensure proper use. If needed, rotate camshafts slightly to properly engage tool.

Next, install crankshaft locking pin tool (11 2 300) into the hole dust plug was removed from.
Figure 48

Next, install crankshaft locking pin tool (11 2 300) into the hole dust plug was removed from. When installing tool, push in until it bottoms out. Slowly rotate engine until pin drops in about 12mm further. Once the tool is installed, confirm the crankshaft can no longer be rotated. Follow the instructions that came along with your special tool kit to ensure proper use. While doing this, be sure to keep some tension on the timing chain. Just hold it in the air; help from an assistant may be needed.

Install the exhaust camshaft sprocket with the timing chain onto the exhaust camshaft.
Figure 49

Install the exhaust camshaft sprocket with the timing chain onto the exhaust camshaft. Be sure that the arrow on the sprocket (yellow arrow) points to the cylinder head sealing surface. Install sprocket fasteners (green arrows) a few turns, do not tighten them yet.

Next, screw in the timing chain pretension tool 11 4 220 into the main timing chain tensioner hole.
Figure 50

Next, screw in the timing chain pretension tool 11 4 220 into the main timing chain tensioner hole. Do not tighten it yet. Just screw it in until it comes in contact with the timing chain guide.

Check that the arrow (yellow arrow) on the exhaust sprocket is still aligned with the cylinder head sealing surface.
Figure 51

Check that the arrow (yellow arrow) on the exhaust sprocket is still aligned with the cylinder head sealing surface. Adjust if needed. Then tighten the three 11mm studs (green arrows) on the camshaft sprocket that we installed finger tight earlier. Tighten to 20 Nm (15 ft-lb).

Install timing chain tensioner to cylinder head.
Figure 52

Install timing chain tensioner to cylinder head. Then tighten the four 10mm timing chain tensioner fasteners (green arrows). Be sure tensioner is still compressed with pin.

Install the exhaust camshaft splined spacer (green arrow) so that the gap in the splines aligns with the gap in the camshaft splines (red arrows).
Figure 53

Install the exhaust camshaft splined spacer (green arrow) so that the gap in the splines aligns with the gap in the camshaft splines (red arrows).

Slide exhaust camshaft splined shaft into camshaft sprocket.
Figure 54

Slide exhaust camshaft splined shaft into camshaft sprocket. Slide it in until the three threaded holes on the camshaft sprocket are centered in the slots of the splined spacer (yellow arrow).

Place the intake and exhaust camshaft sprocket with the secondary timing chain into BMW special tool 11 6 180.
Figure 55

Place the intake and exhaust camshaft sprocket with the secondary timing chain into BMW special tool 11 6 180. Align the intake sprocket so the splined gap is in the position shown (green arrow).

Remove the secondary timing chain and camshaft sprockets from the tool, then install them on the engine in the same way they were orientated in the tool.
Figure 56

Remove the secondary timing chain and camshaft sprockets from the tool, then install them on the engine in the same way they were orientated in the tool. The gap in the splines should align (green arrow).

Slide the splined shaft onto the intake camshaft until you can only see 1mm of the splines (green arrow).
Figure 57

Slide the splined shaft onto the intake camshaft until you can only see 1mm of the splines (green arrow).

Install the intake camshaft spring plate so that you can read FRONT.
Figure 58

Install the intake camshaft spring plate so that you can read FRONT. Then tighten the three 10mm nuts (green arrows) finger tight.

Now back at the exhaust camshaft, install the three E8 inverted Torx bolts.
Figure 59

Now back at the exhaust camshaft, install the three E8 inverted Torx bolts. (green arrows). Tighten to 5 Nm (44 in-lb) then back off half a turn. Then install the thrust plate. (yellow arrow)

Then install the spring plate.
Figure 60

Then install the spring plate. Make sure the marking F is facing outward.

Then install camshaft impulse wheel (yellow arrow) and tighten the 10mm mounting nuts (green arrows) finger tight.
Figure 61

Then install camshaft impulse wheel (yellow arrow) and tighten the 10mm mounting nuts (green arrows) finger tight.

Then pull the exhaust camshaft splined shaft out (green arrow) until it reaches the stop.
Figure 62

Then pull the exhaust camshaft splined shaft out (green arrow) until it reaches the stop.

Preload timing chain tensioner tool 11 4 220 enter bolt to 0.
Figure 63

Preload timing chain tensioner tool 11 4 220 enter bolt to 0.7 Nm (6 in-lb).

Preload the exhaust camshaft impulse wheel (yellow arrow) by hand and tighten the 10mm nuts finger tight.
Figure 64

Preload the exhaust camshaft impulse wheel (yellow arrow) by hand and tighten the 10mm nuts finger tight. (green arrows)

Place VANOS set up bracket 11 6 150 onto cylinder head and evenly tighten fasteners (green arrows) until it is flush with cylinder head.
Figure 65

Place VANOS set up bracket 11 6 150 onto cylinder head and evenly tighten fasteners (green arrows) until it is flush with cylinder head.

Now you can lock the camshaft adjustment fasteners down (green arrows).
Figure 66

Now you can lock the camshaft adjustment fasteners down (green arrows). First torque them all to 5 Nm. Then tighten the 10mm fasteners to 10 Nm (8 ft-lb). Then tighten the E8 inverted Torx fasteners to 20 Nm (15 ft-lb).

Remove the crankshaft locking pin and the camshaft locking tools.
Figure 67

Remove the crankshaft locking pin and the camshaft locking tools. Rotate the engine one full rotation and confirm that the first camshaft lobes point toward each other. (green arrows) Reinstall crankshaft locking tool then install camshaft locking tool. Confirm proper alignment. The camshaft locking tool should be flush or almost flush with intake side of cylinder head sealing surface. 1mm is allowed if using a feller gauge to check. Once you have confirmed the camshafts are timed correctly, remove the special tool from the front of the cylinder head (11 6 150). Clean VANOS unit sealing surface, then install new VANOS actuator gasket. Install VANOS actuator on cylinder head. Install VANOS actuator fasteners and tighten. Install engine hoisting hook and tighten. Next you will install the left hand thread VANOS fasteners and tighten, be sure to use the correct amount of torque, this connection is very important. Install the plastic plugs, they just push back into place. Then install the VANOS actuator metal plugs. Next remove the camshaft and crankshaft locking tools. Reinstall the studs at rear of cylinder head and reassemble valve cover and other items removed. Hydraulic VANOS piston to the camshaft splined shaft torque is 10 Nm (89 in-lb). VANOS sealing plug torque is 50 Nm (37 ft-lb). Install new coolant pipe. Then install VANOS line with seal. Install the intake manifold. See our tech article on intake manifold replacing. Install the exhaust manifold. See our tech article on exhaust manifold replacing. Install the valve cover. See our tech article on valve cover gasket replacing. Install the engine cooling fan and shroud. See our tech article on engine cooling fan replacing. The remainder of the reassembly steps are reverse of removing. Be sure to replace engine oil and engine coolant when done. Bleed cooling system and check for leaks.

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Comments and Suggestions:
Jay Comments: I followed the steps except 9,10,11 then what happened? No crankshaft turned? If so, what shall I do to resolve this problem?
December 28, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: If you didn't lock the engine down using timing tools, you will have to get a set of tools, then time the crankshaft and cylinder head properly before reassembling. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
tarik jnt Comments: I followed your instruction step by step but when I removed the engine top head from the car I found that some valves were slightly open is it a normal situation or could something went wrong how can I fix it if wrong plz help
September 17, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: It is normal. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Atomica mechanica Comments: How do i find 30° btdc ? I followed instructions and had it Locked in a TDC but I started car it ran ok with a little miss
July 13, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: You will need to mark the pulley yourself in increments, then locate 30. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Dave Comments: Thanks Nick, Wanted to make sure I was clear on it!
June 20, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: No problem. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Dave Comments: Hello Nick, Step 64, Pre load the impulse wheel by hand, Could you add some further explanation please. Thank you, Dave
June 20, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Just press it onto the sprocket and hold while installing the nuts finger tight. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Kris Comments: SO i see you installed the head gasket with no sealant in the timing cvhain area should i be using sealant or no?

i dont want it to leave where the head and the timing chain cover meets
May 29, 2016
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: The only place I would add sealant is where two aluminum pieces join. If it a machined surface, the gasket will suffice. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Steve Comments: In picture 59 you state: "install the three E8 inverted Torx bolts. green arrows. Tighten to 5 Nm 44 in-lb then back off half a turn."

Are you sure of the torque spec? Every time we tighten it to 44in-lb and back off 1/2 turn the torx bolts are loose, not even finger tight. Please verify this torque setting. Thank you.
December 16, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: The final torque occurs at step 66. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
Kretman Comments: Had a warped head and they milled .008 in .2mmoff it. Will the oversize head gasket.03 mm still be sufficient? Don't want to ding some valves
October 15, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: 0.3mm is more than 0.2mm, should be fine. to be sure, Give our parts specialists a call at 1-888-280-7799. They can figure out what part or repair kit you need.
- Nick at Pelican Parts
 
Joe V Comments: Can you give a part number for that 3M cleaning tool? I can't seem to find it.
July 7, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: I don't know the 3M part number. It is a 3" Scotch-Brite Roloc Bristle Discs 50 Grit Coarse Green. - Nick at Pelican Parts  
xxs3baxx Comments: Regarding my previous statement and your comment. Yes I followed the instructions on the pelican parts website and the Bentley manual but the exhaust cam still comes out of line... Before doing the timing I lock everything and everything lines up perfectly. Once I complete the installation and remove the locks for the cam and crank, then crank the engine over twice to check if the engine is timed properly, the all the sprockets remain in line but the exhaust camshaft prevents the cam jigs from fitting flush. The difference is not huge but it is off slightly preventing the tool from lining up with the head, but the flywheel lock fits. I'm baffled any assistance would be helpful
May 12, 2015
  Followup from the Pelican Staff: Step 55 shows the camshaft chain alignment, if you followed this step with the engine locked down it should stay in time.

it is possible you have a normal situation, where the VANOS actuator is lagging a bit when you rotate manually. It's hard to say without seeing it myself.- Nick at Pelican Parts
 

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Page last updated: Tue 2/21/2017 02:20:27 AM